Program on International Organizations, Law and Diplomacy
Course Offerings for Summer 2017 in Washington and Geneva

(Please visit our professors page for faculty profiles)

Washington: Tuesday, May 30 - Friday, June 23, 2017

The calendar is subject to change. Class sessions take place at WCL unless otherwise noted. Note that some courses overlap and it won’t be possible to take both. This version updated 5/15/2017.

Per ABA Standards, students seeking academic credit for work earned in a specialized summer program or Institute may register for up to two credits per week.

T&D = Trade and Diplomacy [2 credits], IOs = The Law of International Organizations [2 credits], IP = Introduction to International Intellectual Property (PIJIP) [1 credit], IWR = Introduction to International Workers' Rights [1 credit]

Monday, May 29

MEMORIAL DAY

NO CLASSES

Tuesday, May 30

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Wednesday, May 31

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

Thursday, June 1

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Friday, June 2

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

Monday, June 5

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Tuesday, June 6

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Wednesday, June 7

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Thursday, June 8

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Friday, June 9

 


IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Monday, June 12

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Tuesday, June 13

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Wednesday, June 14

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Thursday, June 15

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Friday, June 16

IP 9:00am-3:50pm (FS 6/16-6/17)

 

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

T&D 6:45pm-9:55pm

Monday, June 19

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

Tuesday, June 20

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Wednesday, June 21

IOs 4:30pm-7:15pm

Thursday, June 22

 

IWR 7:00pm-9:00pm

Friday, June 23

 



The Law of International Organizations
LAW-662-001
2 credits
Meets from 5/31-6/21, 04:30 PM - 07:15 PM (MWF)
Professor Nneoma Veronica Nwogu
Required Book: Klabbers, Jan. An Introduction to International Institutional Law. 2nd ed. New York: Cambridge UP, 2009.

(This course is recommended for students enrolling in the International Labor and Human Rights Track in Geneva.)

           The activities of international organizations affect people and nations on a daily basis through their influence on commerce, governance, security, health and other spheres of human development. International organizations establish standards, impose sanctions, provide emergency and long term assistance, resolve disputes among and within nations and even facilitate social movements. What is the legal personality of an international organization? What are its powers? How does it derive its authority? What constrains it? What are its responsibilities? How is it held accountable? This course will explore these and many other questions through an introduction to the law of international organizations, examining the context for their establishment and the legality of their structures, authority, functions and interactions. The course will survey the core principles of public international law that generally govern all international organizations, while highlighting the variance across select international organizations. Course themes will include enumerated mandate versus implied powers, law making versus standard setting authority, concepts of reputational versus legal risks, internal versus external accountability, legal personality in relation to member state sovereignty. Students will be assigned international organizations to study and present for class discussions.


Trade and Diplomacy
LAW-795TD-001
2 credits
Meets from 5/30-6/16, 06:45 PM - 09:55 PM (5/30 and 6/1 TTh, 6/5-6/16 MWF)
Professor Aluisio Lima-Campos
Professor Chiara Pappalardo
Required texts:
Policy Development and Negotiations in International Trade: A Practical Guide to Effective Commercial Diplomacy, Geza Feketekuty, ed. (2012). (ISBN: 9781477502563)
The New Economic Diplomacy: Decision-Making Negotiation in International Economic Relations, Nicholas Bayne and Stephen Woolcok, 3rd ed. (2013). (ISBN: 9781409425427)
The History and Future of the WTO, Craig VanGrasstek (2013), free download at https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/historywto_e.pdf
WTO Legal Texts, available at https://www.wto.org/english/docs_e/legal_e/legal_e.htm

(This course is recommended for students enrolling in the International Intellectual Property and Trade Track in Geneva.)

This course offers an introduction to international trade diplomacy from the perspective of WTO member governments. It will discuss the trade policies of major players, how they utilize trade policy tools such as preferential trade agreements, trade preference systems, trade remedies, non-tariff barriers, negotiations and dispute settlement, among others, to achieve their goals. Students will acquire a better understanding of the central role of the WTO as the world's trade regulatory body and its three main functions of multilateral negotiations, monitoring and dispute settlement. Taught by an experienced advisor to a foreign government, this course offers the unique opportunity for students to learn about complex international trade issues from the perspective of governments and practitioners of trade diplomacy. This course is recommended for students who want to understand the WTO, as well as the motivations behind the policies and actions of governments regarding international trade issues.


Introduction to International Workers’ Rights
LAW-795WR-001
1 credit
Meets from 6/6-6/22, 07:00 PM - 09:00 PM (TTh)
Professor Desiree LeClercq

(This course is recommended for students enrolling in the International Labor and Human Rights Track in Geneva.)

The debate surrounding workers’ rights in the global economy is increasingly heated and dogmatic, politicized and divisive. Indeed, the recent election debates and executive orders to withdraw from trade commitments have highlighted divisions with respect to the manner and extent to which workers’ rights should be regulated in trade. What are international workers’ rights, how are they established, and what do they mean in theory and in practice? What tools are available to protect and promote them and how have these those tools been applied? This course will provide an overview of the International Labor Organization (ILO), focusing on the ILO’s standard-setting and supervisory functions. Students will discuss the relevance of the ILO to international labor policymaking, with a particular focus on trade, while comparing the U.S. and E.U. approaches to incorporating the ILO’s labor standards in their trade agreements. Taking a closer look at U.S. trade developments, the course will examine the evolution and implementation of labor provisions in U.S. trade agreements, from NAFTA through the present, as well as their enforcement. The course will conclude with a critical examination of the various mechanisms to promote workers’ rights.

Geneva: Monday, June 26 - Friday, July 14, 2017

Monday, June 26th will be the arrival day (no classes). The first class meeting will be held on Tuesday, June 27th. The last class will be held on Thursday, July 13th. Students depart on Friday, July 14th. Classes meet every weekday for two hours per class plus additional site visits.

Participants take 4 credits – 2 courses at 2 credits each choosing either the International Intellectual Property and Trade Track OR the International Labor and Human Rights Track.


INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TRADE TRACK:

Intellectual Property Law and Policy in the Multilateral System
Professor Christine Farley

            This course provides a comprehensive study of international intellectual property policymaking at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a specialized agency of the United Nations created "to encourage creative activity, to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world." The course includes comparative study of international treaties on intellectual property and WIPO’s role in the formation and administration of these instruments. The course will cover contemporary debates around the role of intellectual property in development, including such issues as the impact of patents on public health, the transfer of technology and licensing, regulation of access to genetic resources, protection for traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, enforcement of intellectual property rights, and the role of intellectual property in the promotion of green technology and responding to climate change.

The World Trade Organization: Rule Making and Dispute Settlement
Professor Padideh Ala'i

            This course provides an in-depth look at the World Trade Organization (WTO) with a focus on the structure and internal workings of the WTO.  It will also provide an overview of the substantive areas of international economic relations that are covered in the text of the WTO Agreements.  The course will specifically look at the workings of the different WTO divisions, including the accessions and rules divisions, the workings of specific committees, the WTO dispute settlement mechanism (including the Appellate Body) and the WTO’s Trade Policy Review Mechanism (TPRM).  The course will also explore the relationship of the WTO with non-state actors and civil society groups (particularly those present in Geneva) and will explore relationships of the WTO with other international organizations in Geneva.  The program provides a unique opportunity for discussion and interaction with WTO staff, Appellate Body members, as well as WTO member country representatives and will be hosted at the WTO headquarters in Geneva.


or


INTERNATIONAL LABOR AND HUMAN RIGHTS TRACK:

The International Labor Organization: Decent Work Agenda
Professor Janie Chuang and Susan Carle

            This course will focus on the International Labor Organization and the multiple ways in which it promotes rights at work, employment and social protection. Much of labor legislation around the world is based on the principles and instruments that governments, employers and workers have agreed to in the ILO since 1919. Today this is recognized by the multilateral system as the Decent Work agenda. In addition to employment, social protection, rights at work and social dialogue (tripartite cooperation), a special look will be taken at the ways the ILO makes its unique standards supervisory system work. The course will also highlight corporate social responsibility and the way in which technical cooperation renders the Decent Work agenda operative throughout the world.

Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law: Current Challenges
Professor Claudia Martin
Required book: Buergenthal, Shelton, Stewart (4th Ed, 2009): International Human Rights in a Nutshell, West Publishing

            This course will focus on current developments of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. The course will allow students to be exposed to the practical underpinnings of international human rights law and International Humanitarian Law in the Geneva scene.  Participants will be able to meet some of the main actors currently working in human rights cutting edge issues in Geneva.  They will have unique access to some of the most important actors in the United Nations system and civil society that shape the legal and political debate surrounding the UN Human Rights Council and its special mandates, as well as the work of UN treaty bodies. They will also have the opportunity to exchange views with experts from institutions such as the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, among others.  The course provides participants with a perfect opportunity to complement their interest in human rights and/or humanitarian law by providing the real-life experience of experts working in Geneva from several perspectives in this field of international law.



An ABA-approved program


For more information, contact:

Sean Flynn, Director
Marc LeBlanc, Coordinator

202-274-4048
internationalorganizations@wcl.american.edu