International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia: Chronology

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16 December 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Appeals Chamber stays the Trial Chamber's decision of 12 October 2005, which would have allowed Ramush Haradinaj “to appear in public and engage in public political activities.” The conditions laid out in the Decision for Provisional Release will apply until the Appeals Chamber renders its final decision.

16 December 2005: In the Strugar case, the Appeals Chamber orders the provisional release of Pavle Strugar for no longer than four months so that he can receive a total hip prosthesis at a rehabilitation center in Montenegro. On January 31, 2005, the Trial Chamber sentenced Strugar to eight years’ imprisonment for his involvement in the attack against the city of Dubrovnik in Croatia in 1991. Both Strugar and the prosecutor have appealed the judgment.

13 December 2005: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber denies Milosevic’s request for an extension of time to conclude his defense, finding that he has “failed to take a reasonable approach to the presentation of his case.” Milosevic has used up more than 75% of his 360 total courtroom hours solely on his defense of the Kosovo indictment and, according to the Trial Chamber, “deliberately” left little of his allotted time to deal with Croatia and Bosnia so that the court would grant him an extension. Nevertheless, the judges determine that “[s]hould there be a clear indication in the future that [Milosevic] makes proper and efficient use of time, the chamber might reconsider the position.”  Second, the Trial Chamber decides, in agreement with the wishes of both the defense and the prosecution, not to split the Kosovo indictment from those addressing crimes in Bosnia and Croatia in an effort to speed up the process.  Third, the Trial Chamber rejects Milosevic’s application for a special six-week adjournment to rest, and instead extends the normal three-week winter recess to six.

13 December 2005: In the Martic case, the trial begins.

12 December 2005: At his initial appearance, Ante Gotovina pleads not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, and other inhumane acts [forced displacement; inhumane treatment, humiliation and degradation]) and three counts of  the violation of the laws or customs of war (murder; plunder; wanton destruction of cities, villages, or towns) stemming from his alleged participation in a "joint criminal enterprise" aimed at the "forcible and permanent" removal of the Serb population from the Krajina area of Croatia.

10 December 2005: Ante Gotovina is transferred to the Tribunal’s Detention Unit in The Hague. Gotovina, a former Croatian General, is charged with crimes that took place under his authority against the Serb population of Croatia during and in the aftermath of the August 1995 Croatian military offensive known as Operation Storm.

8 December 2005: Gojko Jankovic, indicted for crimes against humanity and war crimes in the area of the municipality of Foca, is transferred pursuant to rule 11bis from the tribunal to the War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

7 December 2005: Croatian general Ante Gotovina is arrested in the Spanish Canary Islands. He is accused of masterminding the killing of at least 150 Serbs and the expulsion of some 150,000 others during Operation Storm, the August 1995 offensive against Serbs in Croatia’s Krajina region. He has been at-large since he was indicted by the tribunal in 2001.

7 December 2005: In the Bralo case, Miroslav Bralo, a former member of the Croatian Defense Council (HVO) unit known as the "Jokers," is sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. On 19 July 2005 he pled guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, outrages upon personal dignity including rape), and four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (torture or inhuman treatment, unlawful confinement, unlawful confinement of civilians, inhuman treatment). The Trial Chamber said that without the guilty plea, Bralo’s sentence would have been considerably higher.

2 December 2005: Judges Frank Hoepfel (Austria) and Janet Nosworthy (Jamaica) are sworn in as ad litem judges for a four-year term. Currently, the tribunal has nine ad litem judges.

1 December 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Fatmir Limaj and Isak Musliu are released from the ICTY Detention Unit.

30 November 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Fatmir Limaj and Isak Musliu are found not guilty on all charges, and Haradin Bala is sentenced to 13 years for violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, cruel treatment and murder) in the KLA-run Llapushnik/Lapusnik prison camp in 1998.

25 November 2005: In the Deronjic case, the tribunal announces that Miroslav Deronjic will serve his ten-year sentence in Sweden. Deronjic pled guilty in 2003 to having ordered Serbian forces to attack the village of Glogova in 1993. During the attack, 64 Muslim civilians were killed and a substantial part of the village, including its mosque, was destroyed.

21 November 2005: Nebojsa Pavkovic is provisionally released. Pavkovic is indicted alongside Vladimir Lazarevic, Vlastimir Djordevic and Sreten Lukic for crimes against Kosovo Albanians.

17 November 2005: The permanent judges of the ICTY elect Judge Fausto Pocar (Italy) and Judge Kevin Parker (Australia) to two-year terms as President and Vice-President of the Tribunal, effective immediately.

17 November 2005: The fourth, and likely last, four-year term of office for ICTY permanent judges begins. The judges elected by the General Assembly include: Theodor Meron (USA), Fausto Pocar (Italy), Patrick Robinson (Jamaica), Carmel Agius (Malta), Liu Daqun (China), Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana), Mehmet Guney (Turkey), Andresia Vaz (Senegal), Alphonsus Orie (Netherlands), Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany), O-gon Kwon (South Korea), Jean-Claude Antonetti (France), Kevin Parker (Australia), Iain Bonomy (UK), Bakone Moloto (South Africa) and Christine Van den Wyngaert (Belgium). Judge Moloto and former ad litem Judge Van den Wyngaert replace Judges Mumba (Zambia) and El Mahdi (Egypt).

16 November 2005: In the Jankovic case, the Appeals Chamber upholds the Trial Chamber decision to refer the case to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

16 November 2005: In the Halilovic case, the Trial Chamber acquits Sefer Halilovic, former chief of staff of the Muslim-dominated Bosnian army and the highest ranking Bosnian Muslim to have appeared before the ICTY, and orders his immediate release. Halilovic was charged with one count of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) for his alleged superior responsibility for killings of Bosnian Croat civilians by Bosnian army units in the villages of Grabovica and Uzdol. The Trial Chamber rules that the prosecution failed to prove beyond reasonable doubt that Halilovic was was either the de jure or de facto commander of the troops who committed these crimes.

15 November 2005: In the Radic case, Mladjo Radic is transferred to France in order to serve his 20-year prison sentence.

11 November 2005: In the Milosevic case, the defendant is reported ill, forcing trial to be adjourned.

10 November 2005: Trial Chamber III denies the Prosecution’s motion to join three cases involving Milan Martic, Jovica Stanisic, Franko Simatovic and Vojislav Seselj.

3 November 2005: In the Seselj case, the Pre-Trial Chamber enters a plea of not guilty on behalf of the defendant, Vojislav Seselj. Seselj says he cannot enter a plea on 14 counts of crimes against humanity in Croatia, BiH and the Vojvodina region of Republika Srpska, because he has been unable to communicate with his legal counsel since receiving his amended indictment.

2 November 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, The Appeals Chamber rejects the provisional release of Nebojsa Pavkovic, former commander of the Serbian Third Army in Kosovo.

1 November 2005: In the Ademi and Norac case, the case is officially transferred to the Republic of Croatia. This is the first time that the ICTY has referred a case to Croatia. Rahim Ademi and Mirko Norac are charged with two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder), and three counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder; plunder of public or private property; wanton destruction of cities, towns, or villages) for their alleged participation in crimes against the ethnic Serb population during the Croatian attack on the so-called Medak Pocket of the Krajina region in early September 1993.

26 October 2005: In the Rajic case, Ivica Rajic pleads guilty to four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (willful killing, inhumane treatment [including sexual assault], appropriation of property, extensive destruction not justified by military necessity and carried out unlawfully and wantonly). In the plea agreement, Rajic and the Prosecution agreed to a recommended sentence of 12-15 years imprisonment.

25 October 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the prosecution begins its case.

21 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Trial Chamber issues a stay of its October 12 decision to allow Ramush Haradinaj to resume limited political activities until November 21 or “until the date on which the Appeals Chamber renders its decision, whichever is earlier.”

14 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, following an appeal from the Prosecution, the Trial Chamber issues a stay of its decision on the conditions of Haradinaj’s provisional release.

14 October 2005: In the Blaskic case, Josip Jovic makes his initial appearance and pleads not guilty to one count of contempt. He is provisionally released to await trial.

12 October 2005: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber orders Milosevic to produce a list of all witnesses he intends to call, and informs him that the time allotted for his defense runs out “sometime in March” next year.

12 October 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, the Trial Chamber grants Ramush Haradinaj’s motion for a re-assessment of the conditions of his provisional release and grants him the right to appear in public and engage in public political activities “to the extent which the UNMIK finds would be important for a positive development of the political and security situation in Kosovo,” subject to UNMIK’s prior approval. No prior accused awaiting trial at the ICTY has been allowed to take part in public political activities during provisional release.

11 October 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the trial begins. Mile Mrksic, Miroslav Radic and Veselin Sljivancanin are charged with five counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, inhumane acts) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, cruel treatment) in connection with the 1991 massacre, in which more than 200 people were removed from a hospital in Vukovar and taken to a nearby farm where they were shot and buried. All three have pleaded not guilty.

6 October 2005: In the Blaskic case, Croatian authorities arrest journalist Josip Jovic and he is jailed to await his extradition to the ICTY.

5 October 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, the Trial Chamber provisionally releases Sreten Lukic.

3 October 2005: Chief Prosecutor of the ICTY, Carla del Ponte, states that Croatia is complying in a satisfactory manner to all of the requests of the ICTY. In particular, del Ponte notes that actions taken by Croatia in the past few weeks illustrate its full cooperation in the ongoing operations to locate and arrest Ante Gotovina.

28 September 2005: In the Blaskic case, Trial Chamber I issues a warrant of arrest for Josip Jovic after he fails to appear to enter a plea of contempt before the Tribunal. Jovic is accused of “knowingly and wilfully publishing the name of a protected witness.”

21 September 2005: Trial Chamber III grants the prosecution’s motion to join into one indictment six cases involving nine accused charged with crimes relating to the Srebrenica massacre. The nine accused are Vujadin Popovic, Ljubisa Beara, Drago Nikolic, Ljubomir Borovcanin, Zdravko Tolimir, Radivoje Miletic, Milan Gvero, Vinko Pandurevic and Milorad Trbic.

20 September 2005: In the Visegrad case, Sredoje Lukic makes his initial appearance and pleads not guilty to all charges. The prosecution reports that it filed a motion to refer the case to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Lukic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, persecution, murder [2 counts], inhumane acts [3 counts]) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder [2 counts], violence to life and person [2 counts], cruel treatment).

16 September 2005: Sredoje Lukic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit from Republika Srpska. He was indicted in 1998 for crimes committed against the Muslim population in the Bosnian municipality of Visegrad.

14 September 2005: In the Ademi and Norac case, the case becomes the first to be transferred from the Tribunal to Croatia. The defendants are charged with two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; plunder of property; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages).

13 September 2005: Sredoje Lukic, a Bosnian Serb policeman in Visegrad and former member of the White Eagles paramilitary group, surrenders to Serb authorities. Lukic is a cousin of Milan Lukic, the recently apprehended founder of the White Eagles.

9 September 2005: In the Blaskic case, indictments are unsealed against two Croatian journalists, Josip Jovic and Marijan Krizic. Both are charged with one count of contempt of the Tribunal for revealing the identity of protected witnesses in 2000 and 2004, respectively.

2 September 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, the trial ends.

1 September 2005: In the Jankovic et al. case, the Appeals Chamber rejects Radovan Stankovic’s appeal against the decision to transfer his case to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

30 August 2005: In the Miodrag Jokic case, the Appeals Chamber dismisses all of his grounds for appeal and affirms the sentence of seven years imprisonment related to aiding and abetting crimes committed during the shelling of the Croatian city of Dubrovnik in 1991. The Appeals Chamber nevertheless finds that the Trial Chamber erred in law by convicting Jokic on the basis of both individual and command responsibility, and vacates the conviction for command responsibility on all six counts.

25 August 2005: Dragan Zelenovic, a Bosnian Serb military police officer and paramilitary leader in the town of Foca, is reportedly arrested in Russia. He was indicted by the Tribunal in 1996.

8 August 2005: Milan Lukic, the former leader of a Bosnian Serb paramilitary group known as the “White Eagles” is arrested in Buenos Aires. He was indicted by the Tribunal in 1998 for attacks on Muslim civilians in and around the municipality of Visegrad from April 1992 to October 1994.

22 July 2005: In the Stanisic case, Mico Stanisic is provisionally released after the Appeals Chamber rejects the prosecution’s motion to stay his release. Stanisic was Interior Minister in Republika Srpska, and is charged with crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, inhumane acts, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, cruel treatment).

22 July 2005: In the Tolimir et al. case, Radivoje Miletic and Milan Gvero are provisionally released after the Appeals Chamber rejects the prosecution’s motions to stay their release. Miletic and Gvero were generals in the Republika Srpska army and close aids to Ratko Mladic. They are charged with crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

22 July 2005: In the Jankovic et al. case, the case of Gojko Jankovic becomes the fourth to be referred from the ICTY to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Jankovic, who was originally indicted with Dragan Zelenovic and Radovan Stankovic for crimes in the town of Foca, is charged with seven counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (torture, rape) and seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture, rape).

21 July 2005: In the Oric case, the Appeals Chamber rules that the Trial Chamber must reconsider its decision to limit the defense to nine weeks and only 30 witnesses. The defense requested eight months and 72 witnesses.

20 July 2005: In the Mejakic et al. case, the case is referred to Bosnia and Herzegovina. Each of the accused—Zeljko Mejakic, Momcilo Gruban, Dusan Fustar and Dusko Knezevic—are charged with crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, other inhumane acts) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment), and all but Knezevic are charged with both individual and superior responsibility for these crimes.

20 July 2005: In the Deronjic case, the defendant’s appeal is rejected by the Appeals Chamber and his sentence of ten years imprisonment is affirmed.

19 July 2005: In the Bralo case, the defendant pleads guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, outrages upon personal dignity including rape), and four counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (torture or inhuman treatment, unlawful confinement [2 counts], inhuman treatment). The charges relate to crimes committed in Ahmici and other parts of the Lasva valley in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1993.

18 July 2005: In the Boskoski and Tarculovski case, provisional release is rejected for the two defendants. They will remain in detention until their trial begins.

18 July 2005: In the Babic case, the Appeals Chamber finds that the Trial Chamber erred in law in categorically refusing to take the Appellant’s attempts to further peace into account as a mitigating factor on the basis that they did not directly alleviate the suffering of the victims. Nevertheless, it upholds his 13-year sentence after finding that this factor need not be given significant weight in light of the gravity of the crime of which he was convicted and the seriousness of the case. Babic was sentenced in 2004 after pleading guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution).

14 July 2005: In the Seselj case, the defendant loses his outside communication privileges for two months except for legal counsel and diplomatic and consular staff. The accused revealed the identity of a protected witness in a telephone conversation on 18 June 2005.

14 July 2005: In the Halilovic case, the defense rests its case.

12 July 2005: The Trial Chamber approves the joinder of the Pavkovic et al. and the Milutinovic et al. cases. The seven accused—Milan Milutinovic, Nikola Sainovic, Dragoljub Ojdanic, Nebojsa Pavkovic, Vladimir Lazarevic, Sreten Lukic and Vlastimir Djordjevic—are or were Serbian politicians and police or military generals. They are charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, deportation, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) related to the deportation and forcible transfer of around 800,000 Kosovar Albanians in 1999.

8 July 2005: In the Todovic and Rasevic case, the case of Mitar Rasevic and Savo Todovic is transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The trial of the third person on the indictment, Dragomir Milosevic, will be heard by the Tribunal due to the gravity of the crimes charged and his level of responsibility. Rasevic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, torture, inhumane acts [2 counts], murder, imprisonment, enslavement) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, cruel treatment [2 counts], murder, slavery). Todovic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, torture, inhumane treatment, murder, imprisonment, enslavement, other inhumane acts), five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, murder, inhumane treatment [two counts], slavery), and six counts of grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions (murder, torture, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, illegal detention of a civilian, inhuman treatment, wilfully causing great suffering).

30 June 2005: In the Mrksic et al. case, Trial Chamber II grants the prosecutor’s motion to withdraws a request under rule 11bis to refer the case to Croatia.

22 June 2005: In the Todorovic case, the defendant’s sentence is commuted after serving two-thirds of his sentence. Stevan Todorovic was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment in 2001 after pleading guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution).

14 June 2005: In the Blaskic case, Croation journalist Ivica Marijacic and his source, former Croatian intelligence chief Marika Rebic, as well as Stjepan Seselj and Domagoj Margetic, the publisher and editor of Hrvatsko Slovo, plead not guilty to charges of contempt of court for allegedly publishing the identity and testimony of protected witnesses.

13 June 2005: In his bi-annual report to the Security Council, ICTY President Theodor Meron predicts that trials will not be completed by 2008 as ordered by the Council and will extend into the year 2009. Meron notes that Chief Prosecutor has issued seven new or amended indictments, sixty accused are yet to stand trial, ten indictees remain at large, and the Tribunal has only decided to refer one case to a national court thus far. The possibility of building a fourth courtroom is being considered.

9 June 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, the Office of the Prosecutor withdraws its application to refer the case against Mile Mrksic, Veselin Sljivancanin and Miroslav Radic to national courts in Croatia or Serbia and Montenegro. The three former JNA officers are charged with the massacre at Ovcara, near Vukovar, in November 1991. In withdrawing the application, the prosecution highlights unforeseen potential difficulties in trying them locally and the importance of the case to the UN Security Council, as demonstrated by a 1998 resolution demanding their immediate surrender to the ICTY.

9 June 2005: In the Perisic case, Trial Chamber III grants former Serb army general Momcilo Perisic's motion for provisional release subject to certain specific terms and conditions.

8 June 2005: In the Oric case, the Trial Chamber applies amended Rule 98bis for the first time. This time-saving measure authorizes the Chamber to enter a judgment of acquittal by oral decision on any count if there is no evidence capable of supporting a decision. The Trial Chamber upholds the charges of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment, wanton destruction), and acquits the defendant of two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (plunder).

6 June 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, Trial Chamber II grants provisional release to Ramush Haradinaj subject to certain restrictions.

31 May 2005: In the Oric case, the prosecution rests its case against Naser Oric, a former commander of the BiH Army forces in the Srebrenica region who is accused of the plunder and destruction of Serb villages and abuse and murder of detainees in 1992-1993.

30 May 2005: In the Halilovic case, Judge György Szénási of Hungary resigns for health reasons is replaced by Judge Florence Mumba of Zambia, who currently sits on the Appeals Chamber. A permanent judge at the Tribunal, Judge Mumba did not seek reappointment to an additional four-year term; her current term expires on 17 November 2005. The trial is to continue on June 2nd.

17 May 2005: The ICTY Referral Bench decides to refer the case against Radovan Stankovic to Bosnia and Herzegovina. This is the first time the Tribunal has referred one of its indictments to a national jurisdiction. The indictment alleges that in 1992 Stankovic, together with other Serb soldiers, was in charge of a house used to detain at least nine Muslim women and girls who were subjected to repeated rape and sexual assault, and that he personally raped at least two women-one of whom he claimed as his own in order to repeatedly rape her over a three-month period. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (enslavement, rape), and four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (rape, outrages upon personal dignity).

13 May 2005: In the Milosevic case, Kosta Bulatovic, a defence witness in the Slobodan Milosevic case, is found guilty of contempt of the tribunal for refusing the answer questions. He is given a sentence of four months, suspended for two years, conditional on his future cooperation with the Tribunal.

11 May 2005: In the Pandurevic and Trbic case, Milorad Trbic, a former officer in the Republika Srpska army, pleads not guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (murder) for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

6 May 2005: In the Rasim Delic case, the accused is granted provisional release until the start of his trial. Delic is charged with four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, rape, cruel treatment).

6 May 2005: In the Milosevic case, defense witness Kosta Bulatovic pleads not guilty and is tried for contempt of the Tribunal for refusing to answer questions from the prosecution.

5 May 2005: In the Borovcanin case, former deputy commander of the Special Police Brigade of the Republika Srpska Ministry of Interior Ljubomir Borovcanin pleads not guilty to complicity in genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

5 May 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Beqa Beqaj is sentenced to four months imprisonment for contempt of the Tribunal for attempting to influence a prosecution witness, and found not guilty of attempted contempt of the Tribunal and incitement to contempt of the Tribunal. He is released immediately because he has spent five months in prison since being arrested.

4 May 2005: In the Pavkovic et al. case, former Serbian general Sreten Lukic pleads not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) during the war in Kosovo.

3 May 2005: In the Pandurevic and Trbic case, former Bosnian Serb general Vinko Pandurevic pleads not guilty to genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder), for his alleged role in the Srebrenica massacres.

27 April 2005: In the Blaskic case, two indictments for contempt of the Tribunal are released. One indictment charges Markica Rebic, former head of Croatia's Security Information Service, and Ivica Marijacic of the Zagreb weekly Hrvatski List with one count of contempt for disclosing the identity and statement of a protected witness. The second indictment charges Stjepan Seselj with one count of contempt, and Domagoj Margetic with two counts of contempt for disclosing the identity and testimony of a protected witness. Seselj was publisher of the Hrvatsko Slovo, and Margetic was editor of the Hrvatsko Slovo, then editor-in-chief of Novo Hrvatsko Slovo.

25 April 2005: In the Milosevic case, Milosevic returns to court after a week of absence due to "dangerously high blood pressure."

23 April 2005: Former Yugoslav army chief Nebojsa Pavkovic surrenders to the ICTY after a year and a half at large. Packovic is charged with both personal and superior responsibility for four counts of crimes against humanity (deportation, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer], murder, persecutions) and one count of the violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The indictment stems from his alleged involvement in crimes committed during the 1998-99 conflict in Kosovo.

22 April 2005: The indictment against Goran Borovnica is withdrawn without prejudice. Boronvnica was indicted on 13 February 1995 for his involvement in the murder of Muslim prisoners during the 1992-95 Bosnian conflict in Prijedor. While Borovnica was declared dead in November 1996, some information suggests that he might still be alive. Should this be proved at a later date, the charges could be reinstated.

20 April 2005: In the Milosevic case, the proceedings are postponed until April 25 after doctors say that he cannot appear before the Tribunal because his high blood pressure places him at serious risk of a heart attack. This is the twentieth time in three years that the trial has been interrupted due to Milosevic's illness.

20 April 2005: In the Nikolic case, Drago Nikolic pleads not guilty to six counts of genocide, complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]).

18 April 2005: In the Tarculovski case, former Macedonian police officer Johan Tarculovski pleads not guilty to three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages; and cruel treatment) committed between 10 and 12 August 2001 in the village of Ljuboten.

18 April 2005: In the Popovic case, former Bosnian Serb officer Vujadin Popovic pleads not guilty to each of the six charges of his indictment. He is indicted with one count of genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). According to the indictment, Popovic was the assistant commander of security of the Drina Corps, which was on duty at Srebrenica between July and August of 1995.

16 April 2005: In the Haradinaj case, former Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj is granted provisional release to attend the funeral of his brother who was assassinated on 15 April 2005.

15 April 2005: In the Jankovic case, former Bosnian Serb military leader Gojko Jankovic pleads not guilty to all 14 charges in his indictment. Jankovic is indicted on seven counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, rape) and seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture, rape). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the rape and torture of Muslim women during the 1992-95 war in Bosnia in the southeastern town of Foca.

15 April 2005: In the Tolimir et al. case, Bosnian Serb Army General Radivoje Miletic pleads not guilty to crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, deportation and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). Miletic served as deputy to Ratko Mladic from March to August 1995.

14 April 2005: Vujadin Popovic, a former Bosnian Serb army commander, is transferred to the Detention Unit of the ICTY after being at large for three years. His indictment, originally confirmed on 26 March 2002 but subject to a non-disclosure order, charges him with one count of genocide or complicity to commit genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) related to the attack on the Srebrenica enclave by Bosnian Serv forces in July 1995.

14 April 2005: In the Milutinovic et al. case, the Trial Chamber decides to provisionally release the four accused.

13 April 2005: In the Trbic case, the Milorad Trbic makes an initial appearance at the ICTY and exercises his right to wait thirty days to enter his plea.

13 April 2005: In the Beara case, Ljubisa Beara enters a plea of not guilty to all seven counts of his indictment. Beara is charged with genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, and four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) for his alleged involvement in the massacre in Srebrenica.

11 April 2005: In the Cesic case, Rank Cesic is transferred to Denmark to serve his 18-year sentence. Cesic pled guilty to six counts of crimes against humanity (murder, rape) and six violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). A former member of the Bosnian Serb Territorial Defense, he was convicted of crimes that took place in April 1992 while Serb forces were engaged in the take-over of the municipality of Brcko. Cesic is the first defendant to serve his sentence in Denmark.

8 April 2005: In the Trbic case, the Tribunal discloses the indictment, charging Milorad Trbic with one count of crimes against humanity (murder) related to the execution of thousands of captured Bosnian Muslim men from Srebrenica.

7 April 2005: In the Borovcanin case, Ljubomir Borovcanin does not enter a plea because the status of his defense counsel has not yet been resolved. The Tribunal orders that he appear again in thirty days. Borovcanin is charged with one count of complicity in genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder) linked to his involvement in the attack on Srebrenica in July 1995.

7 April 2005: In the Beqaj case, the Tribunal orders the suspension of the provisional release of Beqa Beqaj, effective 21 April 2005. His trial is scheduled to begin on 25 April 2005. Beqaj is charged with contempt, attempted contempt and incitement to contempt for his alleged interference with and intimidation of witnesses in the Limaj case.

4 April 2005: Serbian police general Sreten Lukic surrenders to the court. Lukic is the second of four Serbian generals indicted for crimes in Kosovo to be transferred to the Tribunal. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (deportation, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

1 April 2005: Former Bosnian Serb Ministry of the Interior (MUP) forces commander Ljubomir Borovcanin is transferred to the ICTY. Borovcanin has been at large for approximately two and a half years. The indictment charges Borovcanin with one count of complicity in genocide, four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]), and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

31 March 2005: In the Pandurevic case, former Bosnian Serb General Vinko Pandurevic asks to postpone entering a plea for thirty days until he has time to study the indictment and consult with his defense counsel. Pandurevic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and deportation) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

31 March 2005: In the Miletic case, General Radivoje Miletic declines to offer a plea during his initial appearance and requests more time to study the indictment.

31 March 2005: In the Galic case, Stanislav Galic is released for four days to attend the memorial service of his late sister. Galic began serving a 20-year sentence on 5 December 2003.

30 March 2005: In the Beara case, the Trial Chamber allows the Prosecution to amend the indictment against Ljubisa Beara, the former Bosnian Serb Chief of Security Services of the VRS, to replace the charge of complicity in genocide with the charge of conspiracy to commit genocide. Beara is also charged with one count of genocide and four counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution and other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) related to his involvement in the attack on Srebrenica.

30 March 2005: In the Kvocka case, Miroslav Kvocka is granted early release after serving two-thirds of his seven-year sentence. Kvocka was found guilty on one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture).

24 March 2005: Former Macedonian Interior Minister Ljube Boskoski is taken into custody by the ICTY. Boskoski is charged with three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages; and cruel treatment). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the murder of seven ethnic Albanian civilians during the seven-month conflict in Macedonia between ethnic Albanian guerillas and Macedonian government security forces in 2001.

23 March 2005: Former Bosnian Serb general Vinko Pandurevic surrenders to the Tribunal. Pandurevic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution, deportation, other inhumane acts), and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The charges stem from allegations that Pandurevic, along with Ratko Mladic and Radislav Krstic, commanded and controlled Army of Republika Srpska forces that either killed or expelled most of the members of the Bosnian Muslim population of Srebrenica in July 1995.

18 March 2005: Former Bosnian Serb army officer Drago Nikolic surrenders to the Tribunal. Nikolic is charged with one count of genocide, three counts of crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, and persecution) and one count of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). The charges stem from his alleged involvement in the Srebrenica massacre in July 1995.

18 March 2005: In the Jankovic case, former Bosnian Serb paramilitary leader Gojko Jankovic makes his initial appearance before the Tribunal. The hearing is adjourned after Jankovic states he did not have enough time to study the indictment against him or the opportunity to discuss the indictment with his lawyer.

17 March 2005: In the Stanisic case, Mico Stanisic pleads not guilty at his initial appearance before the ICTY. Stanisic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer], and deportation) and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, and cruel treatment). The charges stem from crimes committed in 1992 when Stanisic was the interior minister of Republika Srpska.

17 March 2005: ICTY President Theodor Meron says that the tribunal will cease to operate only when the trials of Ratko Mladic, Radovan Karadzic and Ante Gotovina (the three highest-ranking officials that have not yet surrendered to the Tribuna) are concluded.

17 March 2005: Drago Nikolic, former chief of security of the Zvornik Brigade in the Republika Srpska army, surrenders to the ICTY. Nikolic is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity (extermination, murder, persecution) and violation of the laws or customs of war (murder) in Srebrenica in July 1995.

16 March 2005: Johan Tarculovski arrives at the ICTY Detention Unit. Macedonia extradited the former police officer to the ICTY to face charges relating to war crimes committed against ethnic Albanians in 2001.

15 March 2005: The ICTY releases its final indictment, charging Ljube Boskoski, former Minister of Interior of Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FRYOM), and Johan Tarculovski, head of a police unit in the security forces, with war crimes for their activities in Ljuboten from May 2001 until November 2002. Each accused is charged with three counts of violations of laws and customs of war (murder, wanton destruction and cruel treatment). They are the only Macedonians indicted by the ICTY.

15 March 2005: In the Haradinaj et al. case, Haradinaj, Balaj, and Brahimaj plead not guilty.

14 March 2005: Gojko Jankovic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit. Jankovic was was indicted in June 1996 for his alleged involvement in the military attack on the town of Foca (BiH) and various surrounding villages, and in the subsequent arrests, beatings, sexual assaults and murders of civilians. He is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (torture and rape) and seven counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture and rape). Jankovic was sub-commander of the military police and paramilitary leaders in Foca at the time relevant to the indictment.

10 March 2005: The Tribunal releases the indictment against Mico Stanisic, charging him with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, torture, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation), and three counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture, and cruel treatment) occuring in the territories of Croatia and BiH from April 1, 1992 until December 31, 1995. By virtue of his role as the the Minister of Internal Affairs in Republika Srpska, he had authority over the functioning of the police forces within Republika Srpska during this time.

10 March 2005: The ICTY releases the indictment against Ramush Haradinaj, Idriz Balaj, and Lahi Brahimaj. Haradinaj is charged with 17 counts of crimes against humanity, including persecution (harassment, inhumane acts, destruction of property, unlawful detention, deportation or forcible transfer of civilians, murder, rape), inhumane acts, deportation and other inhumane acts, imprisonment and other inhumane acts, murders and other inhumane acts, rape and other inhumane acts; and 20 counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (cruel treatment, murders, rape). Balaj and Brahimaj, both subordinanates of Haradinaj at the time of the alleged crimes, are charged with 16 counts of crimes against humanity (persecution [harassment, inhumane acts, unlawful detention, deportation or forcible transfer of civilians, murder, rape], deportation and other inhumane acts, imprisonment and other inhumane acts, murders and other inhumane acts, rape and other inhumane acts; and 19 counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (cruel treatment, murders, rape).

8 March 2005: In the Limaj et al. case, Beqa Beqaj is provisionally released, subject to specific terms and conditions set out by the Tribunal in an order issued on March 4, 2005. Beqaj plead not guilty in November 2004 to charges of "knowingly and willfully interfering with the administration of justice by threatening, intimidating, offering a bribe to or otherwise interfering with witnesses or potential witnesses."

8 March 2005: After learning that he has been indicted by the ICTY, Ramush Haradinaj resigns as Prime Minister of Kosovo to face charges related to his role as a commander in the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) during the period from March 1-September 30, 2005. He is the first sitting politician to be indicted by the ICTY since President Milosevic.

7 March 2005: In the Perisic case, the ICTY releases the indictment against Momcilo Perisic. The indictment charges Perisic with eight counts of crimes against humanity (murder, inhumane acts, persecution and extermination) and five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, attacks on civilians) committed in Croatia and Bosnia. From around August 26, 1993 until November 24, 1998 the accused was the Yugoslav army's most senior official and had authority over all its military forces.

4 March 2005: In the Prcac case, Dragoljub Prcac is released from custody in the Detention Unit after serving his full five-year sentence. He was convicted of one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, torture).

28 February 2005: In the Kvocka et al. case, the Appeals Chamber issues its judgment. The Chamber allows some of Miroslav Kvocka's appeals, but affirms his sentence of seven years. It dismisses all of Dragoljub Prcac's and Mladjo Radic's appeals and affirms their sentences of five years and twenty years, respectively. The Chamber allows some of Zoran Zigic's appeals, but affirms his sentence of 25 years.

28 February 2005: Rasim Delic is transferred to the ICTY Detention Unit in the Hague.

25 February 2005: In the Tolimir case, the ICTY releases the indictment against Zdravko Tolimir. Tolimir was the assistant commander for intelligence and security of the main staff of the Bosnian Serb Army, reporting directly to General Ratko Mladic. The indictment alleges that, by virtue of his position, Tolimir had knowledge of the plan to force the Muslim population from the Srebrenica and Zepa enclaves and was involved in the plan's execution. He is charged with four counts of crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation) and one count of violation of the laws and customs of war (murder).

24 February 2005: In the Gvero and Miletic case, the ICTY releases the indictments against the accused. Milan Gvero was assistant commander for morale, legal, and religious affairs of the main staff of the Bosnian Serb Army, and Radivoje Miletic was chief of operations and training and deputy chief of staff. Both are charged with crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer] and deportation) and violation of the laws or customs of war (murder) committed against the Muslim population in the Srebrenica and Zepa enclaves (East Bosnia) from 1992 until 1995.

24 February 2005: The ICTY releases the indictment against Rasim Delic. Delic was the commander of the main staff of the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ABiH) between June 1993 and December 1995. The indictment charges Delic with four counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder, rape and cruel treatment) for the crimes committed by the ABiH soldiers in the Travnik and Zavidovici municipalities. Delic is the highest-ranking military officer from the ABiH to be indicted for war crimes.

22 February 2005: Rasim Delic, retired general and wartime commander of the Bosnia-Hercegovina Army between 1993 and 1995, announces that he will surrender to the ICTY. Delic is indicted for failure to prevent or punish war crimes committed against ethnic Serbs by a unit of mujahidin fighters from Muslim countries.

21 February 2005: Former Bosnian Serb general Milan Gvero surrenders to the ICTY after a meeting with Serbian Justice Minister Zoran Stojkovic. Gvero was a deputy to former general Ratko Mladic. The indictment against Gvero was issued in December by Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte, and has not yet been made public.

17 February 2005: In the Todovic case, Todovic declines to enter a plea at his second appearance at the Tribunal. A not guilty plea is entered on his behalf. According to the indictment, Todovic is charged with crimes against humanity (persecutions, unlawful detention of civilians, murder, torture, cruel treatment, inhumane acts, causing grievous bodily and mental harm, enslavement) and other crimes committed in the Foca detention facility between 1992 and 1993. Todovic will be tried with Mitar Rasevic, former guard commander in Foca, who has been charged with the same crimes.

14 February 2005: In the Brdjanin and Zupljanin case, a warrant of arrest and order for surrender is issued for Stojan Zupljanin.

14 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the judges suggest that Milosevic stop wasting time and ask witnesses more focused questions so that he will have enough time to present an adequate defense.

10 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the trial chamber issues an order setting out in detail the time both the Prosecution and Milosevic have been allocated to present their cases, and how much time has been used to date. The Chamber notes its order of 25 February 2004 providing that Milosevic would have the same amount of time as the Prosecution to present his case. Milosevic is allotted 90 sitting days to present his case in chief.

9 February 2005: In the Vukovar Three case, ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte requests that the trial be referred to courts in either Croatia or Serbia-Montenegro. The former Yugoslav People's Army (JNA) officers are charged with killing at least 264 Croatian prisoners of war after they were taken from the Vukovar hospital in November 1991. The Prosecution recommends the case be transferred either to Croatia where the crimes were committed, or to Serbia where the accused were arrested and there is an ongoing related trial. The Tribunal will decide if and where the case will be transferred.

9 February 2005: In the Kvocka case, the Appeals Chamber terminates the provisional release of Miroslav Kvocka to take effect on 25 February 2005.

7 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, ICTY President Theodor Meron affirms the denial by the ICTY Registrar of the application by Milosevic's counsel to withdraw from the case. The Registrar's decision implemented the December 7 decision of the Trial Chamber finding no good cause for withdrawal.

7 February 2005: In the Lazarevic case, Vladimir Lazarevic pleads not guilty to charges of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) stemming from his alleged role in the Racak massacre of 45 ethnic Albanian civilians in Kosovo in January 1999. The prosecution asks that the Lazarevic case be joined with the pending trial of former Serbian President Milan Milutinivic, former Yugoslav Vice President Nikola Sainovic and Yugoslav army chief Dragoljub Ojdanic.

4 February 2005: In the Dragan Nikolic case, the Appeals Chamber reduces his sentence to 20 years. Nikolic, the former Bosnian Serb commander of the Susica detention camp was convicted of crimes against humanity (persecution [encompassing murder, rape and torture]). He was originally sentenced to 23 years imprisonment in December 2003.

3 February 2005: In the Lazarevic case, Vladimir Lazarevic, commander of the Pristina Corps of the Yugoslav Army, is transferred from Serbia to the Detention Unit of the ICTY in the Hague. He was indicted by the Tribunal on October 2, 2003, alongside three other Serbian generals. He is charged with responsibility as a superior for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]). The indictment alleges that Lazarevic directed, supported or encouraged the activities of the Yugoslav army in Kosovo, where it murdered hundreds of Kosovo Albanian civilians and cause the forced deportation of approximately 800,000 Kosovo Albanian civilians.

1 February 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, Milosevic is absent from the courtroom for health reasons. The Chamber will decide when to continue with the trial after it receives a report from Milosevic's doctor.

31 January 2005: In the Strugar case, the Trial Chamber sentences former lieutenant-general of the Yugoslav People's Army, Pavle Strugar, to eight years imprisonment for failing to prevent the siege and bombing of the Croatian city of Dubrovnik, specifically the historic Old Town, in December 1991. The Chamber holds that Strugar is guilty of superior responsibility on two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (attacks on civilians, destruction or wilful damage done to institutions dedicated to religion, charity and education, the arts and sciences, historic monuments and works or art and science). He is acquitted of four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder, cruel treatment, devastation not justified by military necessity, unlawful attacks on civilian objects).

31 January 2005: In the Halilovic case, the trial begins before Trial Chamber I. Halilovic is the highest ranking Bosnian-Muslim yet to stand trial at the Tribunal. He is charged with responsibility as a superior for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) while Deputy Commander of the Supreme Command Staff of the Army of BiH during the military operations conducted in 1993 against Croat civilians in the Herzegovina villages of Grabovica and Uzdol in southern area of the country.

28 January 2005: Serbian general Vladimir Lazarevic surrenders to the Tribunal after meeting with Serbia and Montenegro Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica. He is indicted for violations of the laws and customs of war (murder) and crimes against humanity (deportation, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts [forcible transfer]) committed during the Kosovo conflict in 1999.

25 January 2005: Judges Claude Hanoteau from France and Gyorgy Szenasi from Hungary are sworn in as additional ad litem judges.

21 Jaunary 2005: The General Assembly extends the mandates of seven short-term judges whose tenures were set to expire before the end of the trials over which they were presiding.

19 January 2005: In the Todovic and Rasevic case, Savo Todovic makes his initial appearance and is granted one month to enter a plea.

17 January 2005: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, Vidoje Blagojevic is sentenced to 18 years in prison and Dragan Jokic is sentenced to nine years. Both men were tried for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims following the fall of the Srebrenica enclave in July 1995. Blagojevic is found guilty of aiding and abetting the crimes complicity to commit genocide, crimes against humanity (murder, persecution, other inhumane acts), and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder). Jokic is found guilty of aiding and abetting crimes against humanity (extermination, persecution) and violations of the laws or customs of war (murder).

15 January 2005: Savo Todovic surrenders to the Bosnian Serb authorities and is immediately transferred to the Hague. The ICTY has indicted Todovic, a Bosnian Serb, with crimes against humanity (torture, persecution, murder, other inhumane acts, imprisonment, enslavement), violations of the laws and customs of war (torture, inhuman acts, murder, enslavement), and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention (torture, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, murder, unlawful confinement of a civilian, wilfully causing great suffering or serious injury to body or health, other inhumane acts) for the treatment of mainly Muslim prisoners at the Foca concentration camp, where he was deputy commander in 1992 and 1993. According to the indictment, Todovic was in charge of selecting detainees for killings, beatings, interrogations, forced labor and solitary confinement.

11 January 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the trial resumes.

10 January 2005: In the Slobodan Milosevic case, the court-appointed attorneys, Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins, file a request with the President of the ICTY challenging the Registrar's decision that they remain on the case.