May 23 Mon
2022

27th Inter-American Human Rights Moot Court

All Day Washington College of Law

The Inter-American Human Rights Moot Court Competition, under the auspices of the Academy of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, functions as a simulation of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. The event brings together hundreds of law students from all over the world, and its purpose is to argue a hypothetical case about alleged human rights violations. The students represent the victims, or the states accused of the violation, with arguments based on the regulations of the American Convention on Human Rights, in addition to other Inter-American legal instruments. The event involves participating students and practicing professionals in different sectors of human rights, including academics, international and governmental organizations, as well as NGOs. The greatest contribution is made through their participation in legal discussions on issues currently debated in the Inter-American System for the protection of human rights. 


The hypothetical case of 2022 focuses on the topic "Climate Change and Human Rights: Impacts, Responsibilities and Opportunities," and was written by Astrid Puentes Riaño, who is an activist with more than twenty years of experience in environmental protection, human rights, and climate justice in Latin America.  

The competition will take place the week of May 23-27, 2022 on the campus of the Washington College of Law of American University in Washington D.C. 

  • Moot Court
  • Open To Students, Faculty/Staff AND
May 23 Mon
2022

Seminario Práctico en Arbitraje Internacional de Inversiones

09:00AM - 01:30PM Washington College of Law

Módulo Virtual: 23 de mayo al 30 de junio, 2022
Módulo Presencial: July 5 to 8, 2022

Este seminario, patrocinado por CIADI busca ofrecer a las participantes los conocimientos necesarios para aplicar el Derecho Internacional de las Inversiones incluyendo la redacción de demandas de arbitraje, respuestas y otros memoriales relevantes.  El seminario tendrá una duración de 36 horas divididas en dos partes:

Módulo I: consta de conocimientos teóricos impartidos de manera virtual (5 segmentos de 4 horas cada uno). Los participantes tendrán 5 semanas para completar este módulo el que servirá de base al seminario práctico presencial.

Módulo II: consta de un seminario práctico que tendrá lugar de manera presencial en las instalaciones del campus de American University Washington College of Law en Washington, D.C, y que analizará un caso hipotético

General: USD $1,980.00.

El semanario está dirigido a abogados, asesores jurídicos del Estado, corporativos y empresarios. Se acepta también, siempre que haya cupo disponible, a estudiantes de cursos avanzados de pregrado de derecho. 

CUPOS LIMITADOS!
SE RECIBEN POSTULACIONES HASTA EL 15 DE MAYO DE 2022 

  • Training
  • Open To The Public AND Faculty/Staff
May 23 Mon
2022

How to Network for OCI

06:00PM - 07:00PM

Now that you know all the basics about OCI, it's time to hone your networking skills so you can put your best foot forward during the interview process. Join Raquel Skinner as she hosts practicing attorneys who will give you the best tips, tricks, and advice for talking to employers and improving your networking skills.

This event will take place on zoom and the link will be provided before the event. Register on CareerLink. 

  • Presentation
  • Open To Students AND Faculty/Staff
Jun 15 Wed
2022

The Evolving Face of Cyber Conflict and International Law: A Futurespective

08:00AM - 05:00PM Washington College of Law

Join the Tech Law Program for 3 days of programming, June 15-18, 2022!
It’s been a little less than a quarter century since the Morris Worm shook the quixotic orthodoxies about the innate trustworthiness of digital interconnectivity and exposed the soft underbelly of what would shortly explode across the globe – the Internet.  Since that time, criminals, non-state actors, and states have leveraged the inherent insecurities and vulnerabilities of cyberspace at an ever-increasing rate and with ever-more harmful impact.  Data theft, ransomware attacks, and critical infrastructure disruptions, to name a few, are now near daily occurrences.  Notwithstanding the immense societal risks these activities present, a growing number of states have fully embraced cyber tools and operations as staples in their toolkits of both statecraft and warfare.   

At the same time, until recently states have remained relatively silent on their views of how international law regulates their cyber activities.  That has begun to change, however, with an increasing number of states making official pronouncements of their opinio juris, either independently or through established multilateral processes like the UNGGE and OEWG.  While this is a positive trend, it has also highlighted several disparate views on critical issues and the difficulty in achieving anything more than limited clarity and consensus.  What can we discern from these state pronouncements?  What is the present state of the law governing state cyber activities, and where is it headed?  That is the focus of this symposium. 

  • Conference
  • Open To The Public, Alumni, Students AND Faculty/Staff
Jun 16 Thu
2022

The Evolving Face of Cyber Conflict and International Law: A Futurespective

08:00AM - 05:00PM Washington College of Law

Join the Tech Law Program for 3 days of programming, June 15-18, 2022!
It’s been a little less than a quarter century since the Morris Worm shook the quixotic orthodoxies about the innate trustworthiness of digital interconnectivity and exposed the soft underbelly of what would shortly explode across the globe – the Internet.  Since that time, criminals, non-state actors, and states have leveraged the inherent insecurities and vulnerabilities of cyberspace at an ever-increasing rate and with ever-more harmful impact.  Data theft, ransomware attacks, and critical infrastructure disruptions, to name a few, are now near daily occurrences.  Notwithstanding the immense societal risks these activities present, a growing number of states have fully embraced cyber tools and operations as staples in their toolkits of both statecraft and warfare.   

At the same time, until recently states have remained relatively silent on their views of how international law regulates their cyber activities.  That has begun to change, however, with an increasing number of states making official pronouncements of their opinio juris, either independently or through established multilateral processes like the UNGGE and OEWG.  While this is a positive trend, it has also highlighted several disparate views on critical issues and the difficulty in achieving anything more than limited clarity and consensus.  What can we discern from these state pronouncements?  What is the present state of the law governing state cyber activities, and where is it headed?  That is the focus of this symposium. 

  • Conference
  • Open To The Public, Alumni, Students AND Faculty/Staff