International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia: Chronology

Last Updated 17 April 2014

Selected Events From: 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007

9 October 2014: Appeals chamber in Prlić et al. case grants the motions for extension of time and orders the appeal briefs would be filed by 12 January 2015 and the respondent and reply briefs should be filed in May next year.

7 October 2014: Parties in Karadžić case present their rebuttal and rejoinder arguments concluding Closing Arguments in the case. It is estimated that the delivery of the Trial Chamber Judgment is October 2015. Trial of Hadžić case resumes with testimony from Vojin Šuša, Minister of Justice of the Serbian autonomous district Slavonia, Baranja and Western Srem during the relevant period. Šuša testifies until 10 October 2014.

2 October 2014: Witness Svetozar Petković testifies about the events in Foča during the relevant period in Mladić defence case.

1 October 2014: Witness Branko Davidović, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sanski Most during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 2 October 2014.

30 September 2014: Witnesses Noica Andrić, member of the Territorial Defence Rogatica during the relevant period, and Obrad Bubić, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Kotor Varoš during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case. Bubić testifies until 1 October 2014.

29 September 2014: Parties in Karadžić case present their closing arguments until 2 October 2014. Witnesses Zoran Durmić, Republika Srpska police officer in the area of Milići during the relevant period, and Đorđo Krstić, deputy manager of the Batković camp, near Bijeljina, during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case. Chamber grants the Defence’s motion in Hadžić case for adjournment of the trial to prepare for the testimony of an upcoming witness. Karadžić files his public redacted final trial brief in his case.

26 September 2014: French translation of the judgment against Tolimir is filed.

25 September 2014: Witnesses Stojan Malčić and Vlade Lučić, Republika Srpska Army offices in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case.

23 September 2014: Witness Desimir Šarenac, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 24 September 2014. Witness Sergija Veselinović, President of the municipality of Obrovac, Croatia during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case until 24 September 2014. Parties in Prlić et al. case meet before Judge Meron for a Status Conference. MICT President Meron’s 31 March 2014 decision that Nikola Šainović would serve his sentence in Sweden is made public.

22 September 2014: Witnesses Božidar Krnojelac, member of the Serb forces in Foča during the relevant period, and Milorad Sokolović, municipal official in Rogatica during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case. Sokolović testifies until 23 September 2014. Witness Karmen Brlić-Jovanović, journalist at Radio Vukovar during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case. President Meron assigns Judge Khan to replace Judge Sekule on the appeal bench in Stanišić & Župljanin case and Judge Sekule will replace Judge Khan on the appeal bench in Tolimir case.

18 September 2014: Witness GRM-246 testifies in Mladić defence case until 19 September 2014. Pre-appeal Judge Meron grants the Defence motions and refers the appellants’ requests for extension of time in word limit in relation to their appeal briefs to the Appeals Chamber seized of the Prlić et al. case.

17 September 2014: Witness Stojan Džino, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Witness Milenko Dafinić, member of the Serb forces in the area of Borovo Selo, Croatia, during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case.

16 September 2014: Witness Mihajlo Vujasin, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 17 September 2014. Witness Borivoje Milinković, member of the Government of the Serbian autonomous district “Slavonia-Baranja-Western Srem” during the relevant period, continues testimony from 11 September 2014 in Hadžić defence case.

15 September 2014: Witness DGH-044 testifies in Hadžić defence case until 16 September 2014.

11 September 2014: Witness Borivoje Milinković, member of the Government of the Serbian autonomous district “Slavonia-Baranja-Western Srem” during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case. French translation of the appeal judgment against Dragomir Miloševic is filed.

10 September 2014: Witness Dorde Marjanović, personal security guard of Mladić during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case.

9 September 2014: Witness Vojislav Šešelj, political party leader in Serbia during the relevant period/currently accused by the ICTY, testifies in Hadžić defence case until 10 September 2014.

8 September 2014: Witnesses Milosav Gagović, Yugoslav Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, and Vladimir Lukić, Prime Minister of Republika Srpska during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case. Lukić will testify until 10 September 2014. Witness Vojislav Vukčević, official of the SDS party in Croatia during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case. BCS translation of the trial judgment against Mićo Stanišic and Stojan Župljanin is filed.

5 September 2014: Pre-appeal Judge Meron denies the parties’ motions for extension of time to file the appeal briefs.

4 September 2014: Witness Radovan Glogovac, Vice-president of the SDS party in Zenica during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Witness Vojislav Vukčević, official of the SDS party in Croatia during the relevant period, testifies in Hadžić defence case.

3 September 2014: Witness Boško Gvozden, Republika Srpska Army officer – Communications regiment during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Witness Amanda Čelar testifies about the events in Baranja, Croatia during the relevant period in Hadžić defence case until 4 September 2014.

2 September 2014: Witness Milenko Inđić, JNA/Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 3 September 2014. Judge Meron orders the next Status Conference in Prlić et al. case to be held on 23 September 2014.

1 September 2014: Witness Milorad Bukva, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 2 September 2014. Goran Hadžić testifies at his trial until 3 September 2014.

27 August 2014: Witness Velimir Dunjić, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 28 August 2014.

26 August 2014: Witness Ratko Adžić, municipal official in Ilijaš during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. 13 March 2014 decision of MICT President Meron that Nebojša Pavković would serve his sentence in Finland is made public.

25 August 2014: Witness Goran Šehovac, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Judge Orie in the Mladić case announces that the trial will now sit four days a week. Goran Hadžić testifies in his defence case until 28 August 2014.

22 August 2014: Pre-appeal Judge Meron grants in part motions from the Defence teams for extension of time and word limit and orders that all appellants’ briefs should be filed no later than 4 November 2014 in Prlić et al. case. MICT Single judge Vagn Joensen, after having received the Trial Chamber’s reply from 6 August, dismisses as moot Karadžić’s request for appointment of a single judge to “consider the appointment of an amicus curiae prosecutor to investigate whether members of the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia had willfully interfered with the administration of justice in the ICTY” because of the disclosure violations.

4 & 5 August 2014: Ćorić, Stojić, Petković and Prlić file their notices of appeal against the judgment in Prlić et al. case.

24 July 2014: Parties in Stanišić & Župljanin case meet before Judge Agius for a Status Conference. Appeals Chamber dismisses the Defence Interlocutory Appeal from the Trial Chamber Rule 98bis ruling in Mladić case. Appeals Chamber dismisses the interlocutory appeal (filed confidentially in relation to counts 1 and 2) by Mladić Defence against the Rule 98bis decision. Appeals Chamber concludes that based on the totality of evidence in relation to these two counts “the Trial Chamber did not err in finding that a reasonable trier of fact could have concluded that, taken at its highest, there was sufficient evidence to infer that Mladić possessed genocidal intent.”

23 July 2014: Witness Zoran Kovačević, former officer in the Bratunac Brigade of the Republika Srpska Army, testifies in Mladić defence case until 24 July 2014.

22 July 2014: Witness Milan Pejić, a doctor in Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 23 July 2014. Parties in Popović case meet before Judge Robinson for a Status Conference.

21 July 2014: Witnesses Veselinko Simović, former member of the Territorial Defence in Foča, and Nenad Deronjić, testify in Mladić defence case. Deronjić’s continues testimony until 22 July 2014. Goran Hadžić continues testimony in his defence case until 24 July 2014.

18 July 2014: Witness Zoran Nikolić testifies in Mladić defence case about the events in Foča during the relevant period.

17 July 2014: Witness Milutin Vujičić testifies in Mladić defence case about the events in Foča during the relevant period.

15 July 2014: Witness Dragan Milanović, Republika Srpska officer in the area of Foča during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case from this day until 16 July 2014. Appeals Chamber orders the reclassification of the recordings (audio and video) of the testimonies of protected witnesses BX and CD from 25 October and 22 November 2006.

14 July 2014: Witness Nenad Kecmanović, member of the BiH Presidency during the relevant period, continues testimony in Mladić defence case. Witness Milorad Sehovac, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case from this day until 15 July 2014. Goran Hadžić testifies in his case from this day until 17 July 2014.

11 July 2014: President of the ICTY Judge Meron issues a statement on the anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide.

10 July 2014: Witness Nenad Kecmanović, member of the BiH Presidency during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić case until 11 July 2014. Trial Chamber decides to terminate the process of provisional release to Šešelj.

8 July 2014: Defence witness Luka Dragičević, JNA/Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić case from this day until 9 July 2014.

7 July 2014: Witnesses Siniša Makismović, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, resumes testimony from 4 July 2014 and Blaško Rašević, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 8 July 2014. The accused, Goran Hadžić, testifies in his trial from this day until 10 July 2014.

4 July 2014: Defence witnesses Slobodan Tuševljak, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, and Siniša Makismović, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testify in Mladić case. Hadžić testifies in his case.

3 July 2014: Defence makes its opening statement in Hadžić case, statement of the accused pursuant to Rule 84bis of the rules follows Defence’s opening statement. The accused, Hadžić, testifies. Trial Chamber issues an order inviting Šešelj to state his commitment to respect conditions for potential provisional release.

2 July 2014: Witness Vladimir Radojćić, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, resumes testimony from 27 June 2014 and witness Slobodan Tuševljak, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 4 July 2014.

27 June 2014: Appeals Chamber instructs Registrar to assign counsel to Slobodan Praljak in the interest of justice, denies his request for stay of proceedings, and orders him to reimburse the ICTY for the Defence cost.

25 June 2014: Witness Vladimir Radojćić, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case until 27 June 2014.

24 June 2014: Witness Stevan Veljović, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 25 June 2014. Parties in Tolimir case meet before Judge Meron for a Status Conference. Trial Chamber decides that Hadžić Defence will have a total of 140 hours to lead its evidence and grants Defence’s motion to sit four days per week for the duration of the testimony of the accused. Trial Chamber requests the government of Serbia to confirm, within seven days of receipt of this decision, if it is able to guarantee a number of proposed measures for the potential provisional release of Šešelj. The Government of the Netherlands is invited to provide comments as Host Country.

23 June 2014: Defence witness Miloš Škrba, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić case until 24 June 2014.

17 June 2014: At Pre-Defence Conference for Hadžić case, the Trial Chamber announces it will sit five days a week during July and August, outside the recess, and the Defence case will commence 3 July 2014. The defence requests a reduction of his sitting schedule to four days a week in July due to the accused, Hadžić, being the only witness expected to testify, and that the defence will need 140 hours to present its case.  Šešelj submits his observations on his possible provisional release at the initiative of the Chamber.

16 June 2014: Mladić case adjourns due to the ill health of the accused canceling all hearings for this week.

13 June 2014: Trial Chamber issues an order asking parties in the case of Vojislav Šešelj to submit their observations on the possible provisional release of the accused proprio motu, at the initiative of the Chamber. Trial Chamber notes the Appeals Chamber’s decision of 6 June 2014 and notes that proceedings will be delayed for an undetermined period while Judge Niang familiarises himself with the trial record of the Šešelj case.

12 June 2014: Witness Milorad Batinić, worked at the Vraca Memorial Park during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 13 June 2014.

11 June 2014: Appeals Chamber grants the Prosecution’s motion to present certain material to rebut the letter written by Judge Harhoff, which was admitted as additional evidence for the Defence earlier this year.

10 June 2014: Witnesses Dragomir Andan, Republika Srpska military and police official during the relevant period, resumes testimony from 6 June 2014 and Svetozar Guzina, testify in Mladić defence case until 11 June 2014. Guzina testifies about events in Sokolovic Kolonija during the relevant period.

6 June 2014: Witness Dragomir Adan, Republika Srpska military and police official during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Appeals Chamber denies Šešelji’s appeal against the decision from 13 December 2013, when the Trial Chamber ordered the resumption of the proceedings after the newly-appointed Judge Niang becomes familiar with the case record. Prosecutor Serge Brammertz addresses the Security Council, presenting the 21st report by the Office of the Prosecutor on the progress towards completion of its mandate.

5 June 2014: Witness GRM-311 testifies about the events in Sarajevor during the relevant period in Mladić defence case until 6 June 2014. Tribunal President, Judge Meron addresses the UN Security Council on the progress of the ICTY towards completion of its mandate.

3 June 2014: Witnesses Veljko Lubura, engineer for distribution of electrical energy in Pale during the relevant period, and Zdravko Čvoro, municipal official in the municipality of Pale during the relevant period, testify in Mladić case. Čvoro testifies until 5 June 2014.

2 June 2014: Witness Dragan Lalović, JNA/Republika Srpska Army officer during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case.

30 May 2014: Witnesses Zdravko Čvoro, municipal official in the municipality of Pale during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case. Defence case of Goran Hadžić has been rescheduled to being on 3 July 2014 at 9:00 in courtroom III. Case rescheduled due to unavailability of Judges Mindura and Hall. The Pre-defence conference remains scheduled for Tuesday, 17 June at 9:00 in courtroom III.

29 May 2014: Witness Milorad Džida, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 30 May 2014.

28 May 2014: Witness Dragan Maletić, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 29 May 2014. In public redacted version of the 30 April 2014 decision of MICT President Meron granting early release to Ranko Češić effective 25 May 2014. President Meron bases his decision on the grounds that Češić had completed two-thirds of his sentence of 18 years imprisonment, demonstrated signs of rehabilitation and cooperated with the Prosecution.

27 May 2014: Witness Slavko Gengo, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 28 May 2014. Parties in Prlić et al. case meet before Judge Meron for a Status Conference.

26 May 2014: Witness Nikola Mijtanović, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case.

23 May 2014: Witness Branko Radan, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case.

22 May 2014: Witness Branko Radan, municipal official in Novo Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case until 23 May 2014. The Chamber dismisses Radovan Karadžić’s motion for “bifuriated” judgment as it finds no reason to depart from the Tribunal’s practice of determining the sentence together with the conviction, if any.

21 May 2014: Pre-Appeal Judge Meron grants Prlić’s request to permits his counsel, Karnavas, to participate in Status Conference, on 27 May, via video link from Cambodia. Appeals Chamber of the Mechanism denies the appeal of Radovan Stanković against a confidential decision of the ICTY’s Referral Branch dismissing his request to return his case to the ICTY, concluding that the Referral Bench correctly considered that to revoke a referral order after the legal proceedings in the State (Bosnia) had been completed would be contrary to the Rule 11bis.

20 May 2014: Witnesses Predrag Trapara and Dušan Škrba, Republika Srpska Army officers in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testify in Mladić defence case. Škrba testifies until 22 May 2014.

19 May 2014: Witness Mile Sladoje, Republika Srpska Army officer in the area of Sarajevo during the relevant period, testifies in Mladić defence case.

13 May 2014: Appeals Chamber in the Prlić case grants application by the Registrar and orders Slobodan Praljak to reimburse the Tribunal €2,807,611.10 within 90 days or in monthly installments over a three-year period. Defence of Hadžić files confidentially its list of witnesses informing that it will call 78 witnesses during its case. Defence estimates it will need approximately 142 hours for the direct examination of its witnesses.  

12 May 2014: Pre-Defense Conference takes place in Mladić case granting the defense 207.5 hours, mirroring the number of hours granted to the Office of the Prosecutor, to present its case.

8 May 2014: Defence case of Ratko Mladić is scheduled to begin on Monday, 19 May, at 9:30 a.m. in courtroom I. Mladić, former Commander of the Bosnian Serb Army Main Staff, stands accused of genocide and a multitude of crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims, Bosnian Croat and other non-Serb civilians in Bosnia and Herzegovina from May 1992 to late 1995.

7 May 2014: Judge Agius, Presiding Judge of the Appeals Chamber in the Stanišić and Župljanin Case, designates himself as the Pre-Appeal Judge for all pre-appeal proceeding in the case. Closing arguments for the case of Radovan Karadžić are scheduled for 29 September through 2 October with the rebuttal arguments scheduled for 7 October.

15 April 2014: The Trial Chamber rejects Ratko Mladić’s submissions for acquittal made under Rule 98 bis of the Tribunal’s Rules of Procedure and Evidence. The Trial Chamber dismisses all of the Mladić Defence’s arguments for acquittal on two counts of genocide, stating that “there is evidence that acts of genocide took place” in the 15 BiH municipalities charged in the indictment, as well as in Srebrenica, and that the “evidence cited also provides information on the perpetrators’ genocidal intent.”

2 April 2014: The Trial Chamber in the Karadzic case orders that both parties file their final briefs by 29 August 2014 and states that closing arguments for the case will begin on 29 September 2014.

2 April 2014: In the case for Ratko Mladic, the Trial Chamber orders a five-day hearing schedule for the Defence case, scheduled to begin on 13 May. The order comes after receiving medical reports filed confidentially earlier this year and subsequent submissions from the parties. Two specialists concluded, among other things, that "delaying or protracting the course of the trial would be disadvantageous to Mladic' s health."

19 March 2014: The Defence and the Prosecution complete their Rule 98bis submissions in the Mladić case. The Mladić Defence asks the Chamber to dismiss two genocide counts, as well as a number of incidents and liabilities, from the indictment. The Prosecution asks the Chamber to dismiss all of the Defence's arguments.

3 March 2014: Hearings in the case ofRadovan Karadžić closer. The Defence case will officially close in due course once the Trial Chamber renders decisions on pending evidence related motions.

3 March 2014: The Defence for Zdravko Tolimir files a public redacted version of his Appeal Brief. The appellant sets forth 25 grounds of appeal, inviting the Appeals Chamber to overturn all the convictions or to significantly reduce the sentence imposed by the Trial Chamber. Tolimir was found guilty of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in 1995 after the fall of the enclaves of Srebrenica and Žepa, Bosnia and Herzegovina in December 2012. He was sentenced to life imprisonment.

27 January 2014: The Appeals Chamber confirms Vlastimir Đorđević’s guilt for crimes committed by Serbian forces against Kosovo Albanians during the conflict in Kosovo. The Appeals chamber partially grants the appeals of both the Defense and the Prosecution, finding Đorđević guilty of persecutions through sexual assaults, and not guilty of specific incidents of forced deportations, reducing Đorđević’s sentence from 27years to 18 years in prison.

22 January 2014: President Meron denies the Defense’s motion in the Mladić trial for the disqualification of Judge Flügge and Judge Orie.

18 December 2013: The Prosecution in the Hadžić case presents its response to the Defense’s Rule 98bis submission. The trial is adjourned until further notice.

16 December 2013: The Hadžić Defense presents its Rule 98bis submission claiming the Prosecution has not proven any of the counts against Hadžić.

16 December 2013: The Mladić defense submits motions seeking the disqualifications of Judge Flugge and Judge Orie

16 December 2013: The Trial Chamber decides that proceedings in the Šešelj case will continue after Judge Niang familiarizes himself with the case record.

16 December 2013: Judge Afande is assigned to sit on the Appeals bench for the Stanišić and Simatović case, replacing Judge Meron.                                                            

13 December 2013: President Meron denies Mile Mrkšić’s 4 application for early release. In the decision, the President notes that Mrkšić has only served half of his 20 year sentence for aiding and abetting murder, torture and cruel treatment. Though Mrkšić is showing some signs of rehabilitation, the President stated “these factors in my view do not warrant his release now.”

12 December 2013: Judge Koffi Kumelio Afande is sworn in as an ICTY permanent judge.

11 December 2013: The Chamber issues subpoena against Ratko Mladić compelling him to testify as a witness for Karadžić's Defense.

3 December 2013: Judge Agius denies Župljanin's request for the disqualification of Judge Daqun.

20 November 2013: The Appeals Chamber announces that in the case of Nikola Šainović and others, the Appeals Judgement will be pronounced on 23 January 2014 at 9:30 in Courtroom III.

20 November 2013: The Appeals Chamber announces that the Appeals Judgement in the case of Vlastimir Đorđević will be pronounced on 27 January 2014 at 15:30 in Courtroom I.

18 November 2013: The General Assembly elects Mr. Koffi Kumelio Afande from Togo as a new permanent judge of the Tribunal. His mandate will run until 31 December 2013 or earlier, should the cases on which he will be sitting be completed prior to that date.

13 November 2013: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Appeals Chamber denies the appeal of Zdravko Tolimir of the Trial Chamber’s decision of 9 May to issue a subpoena for him to testify as a defense witness in Karadžić’s trial. In reaching its decision, the Appeals Chamber concludes that the Karadžić Trial Chamber was ‘best positioned’ to determine whether a subpoena should be issued. The Appeals Chamber also rejects Tolimir’s arguments relating to his right not to testify to prevent self-incrimination, stating that any potentially self-incriminating information that could emerge during his testimony in the Karadžić case could not be used either directly or indirectly against him in his own case.

12 November 2013: President Meron grants early release to Darko Mrđa, effective on 10 October of this year. Mrđa demonstrated signs of rehabilitation and he had served two thirds of his sentence on 10 October 2013. In relation to his guilty plea, President Meron states that Mrđa had provided substantial cooperation to the Prosecution ad concludes that "despite the severe gravity of his crimes (to which he pleaded guilty and for which he continues to admit responsibility), Mrđa should be granted early release."

21 October 2013: The prosecution in the Mladić case is expected to complete its presentation of evidence in November, 2013, and the defense, if any, will commence in February or March, 2014.

21 October 2013: Stojan Župljanin files a motion requesting recusal of Judge Liu Daqun from adjudication of his motion to vacate trial judgement. Judge Daqun was a member of the Special Chamber that ruled on Judge Harhoff’s disqualification from the Šešelj case. Župljanin’s motion states that because Judge Daqun dissented to Judge Harhoff’s disqualification, Judge Daqun is not in a position to adjudicate the current matter without being biased or predisposed to a particular outcome.

21 October 2013: Following the confirmation of Judge Harhoff’s disqualification in the Šešelj case, the defense in the case of Stojan Župljanin files a motion requesting the Appeals Chamber to vacate the Trial Judgement against Župljanin. Judge Harhoff was a member of the bench that convicted Župljanin on 27 March 2013, sentencing him to 22 years’ imprisonment for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed between April and December 1992 in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

18 October 2013: A specially appointed chamber finds that it does not have jurisdiction to consider a request filed by Radovan Karadžić to appoint an amicus curiae prosecutor to investigate possible contempt of the Tribunal by former prosecutor Carla Del Ponte. The Chamber concludes that Karadžić’s motion should be considered by the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT).

14 October 2013: Following the confirmation of Judge Harhoff’s disqualification in the Šešelj case, the defense in the case of Mićo Stanišić files a motion requesting the Appeals Chamber to declare a mistrial and to discontinue proceedings against him. Judge Harhoff was a member of the bench that convicted Mićo Stanišić on 27 March 2013, sentencing him to 22 years’ imprisonment for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed between April and December 1992 in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

14 October 2013: President Meron presents the Tribunal’s twentieth annual report to the UN General Assembly noting that the Tribunal has rendered more judgements in the year ending 1 August 2013 than in almost any previous reporting period. President Meron estimates that the Tribunal will wrap up its remaining appeals cases by mid-2017.

7 October 2013: Special Chamber denies a motion to reconsider the disqualification of Judge Frederik Harhoff from the Šešelj trial.  

6 October 2013: One of the three ongoing trials will continue during the week of 7 October 2013 – the trial of Goran Hadzic, former Croatian Serb political leader. Ratko Mladic’s trial will continue on 16 October 2013, with presentation by the prosecution, and the trial on Radovan Karadzic will continue on 29 October 2013.

4 October 2013: Slobodan Praljak asks for a stay of proceedings until he has received the judgment in the case against him and his notice of appeal in a language he understands – Bosnian, Croatian, or Serbian. Praljak plans to represent himself in future proceedings, after the Tribunal removed his legal assistance, once discovering he had money to fund his own defense.

3 October 2013: Appeal hearings for five Bosnian Serb military and police officers will take place from 2 to 13 December 2013. The five VRS officers are convicted for crimes in Srebrenica and Zepa in 1995.

1 October 2013: Special plenary hearing reelects Judge Meron and Judge Aguis as president and vice-president of the ICTY.

1 October 2013: The ICTY’s president, Theodor Meron, appoints a special chamber to investigate Radovan Karadzic’s claim of contempt of court by former tribunal chief prosecutor Carla Del Ponte.

30 September 2013: Radovan Karadzic submits a list of witnesses we wants to call at his trial, which includes Ratko Mladic and former Bosnian Serb parliament speaker Momcilo Krajisnik. Karadzic expects that Mladic will confirm that he never ordered the deaths of the Srebrenica captives, therefore proving that Karadzic never carried them out. Karadic wants Krajisnik to testify in November and Mladic in December.

27 September 2013: Radovan Karadzic asserts that former chief prosecutor Carla Del Ponte may be in contempt of court. Karadzic presented a cable from the U.S. Embassy dated 16 April 2004, which shows Del Ponte allegedly disclosing confidential information relation to Slobodan Milosevic’s case, violating the rules of the Tribunal.

26 September 2013: Barry Hogan, OTP investigator, presents his evidence about the reconstruction of sniper incidents in Sarajevo, in the trial of Ratko Mladic. Previously, Hogan’s evidence had been used at the trial of Radovan Karadzic. Hogan, using a GPS device, has been able to pinpoint to coordinates of 16 locations where sniper incidents involving Karadzic and Mladic occurred.

13 September 2013: Ratko Mladić’s health is the subject of disagreement as to how often to convene his trial, in order to preserve his presence at the proceedings. Mladić left court early on 9 September and did not return when the trial resumed the next day. Mladić, the commander of the Bosnian Serb army from 1992 to 1996, is charged with crimes of genocide, persecution, extermination, murder, and forcible transfers.

9 September 2013: Zdravko Tolimir files his amended notice of appeal against the Trial Chamber Judgement rendered in December last year. He presents 25 grounds of appeal asking the Appeals Chamber to overturn all convictions or, in the alternative, to significantly reduce his sentence.

6 September 2013: The panel originally appointed to consider Šešelj’s motion for disqualification of Judge Harhoff from his case reconvenes to rule on the Prosecution’s motion of 3 September asking for reconsideration of the disqualification.

29 August 2013: Momčilo Krajišnik is granted early release from a prison in the UK following the President’s decision on 2 July 2013. The President found that the high gravity of the crimes for which Krajišnik was convicted weighed against his early release, Krajišnik’s application was granted on the basis of his good behavior during his detention, his demonstration of some rehabilitation and the fact that by 3 August 2013, he had served two-thirds of his sentence.

29 August 2013: The President grants Dragoljub Ojdanić early release from the United Nations Detention Unit where he has been serving his 15-year sentence. The President finds that while the gravity of the crimes for which Ojdanić was convicted weigh against his early release, the President grants the application on the basis that Ojdanić has served two-thirds of his sentence, has shown acceptance of his conviction and has demonstrated good and productive behavior during detention.

28 August 2013: A specially appointed panel finds that Judge Frederik Harhoff, a judge in the Vojislav Šešelj case had demonstrated an unacceptable appearance of bias in favour of conviction in a private letter he circulated on 6 June 2013. Judge Harhoff has been disqualified from the Šešelj case by this decision.

28 August 2013: The Chamber denies Radovan Karadžić’s motion, filed on 1 July 2013, to dismiss the indictment against him.

27 August 2013: The prosecution in the Prlić et. al. case files an appeal against the Trial Chamber judgement asking for increased sentences.

2 August 2013: In the Radovan Karadžić case, the Chamber partially grants Karadžić’s motion for a suspension of the trial to allow the Defense to adjust its case. The Chamber orders the hearings to resume on Monday, 28 October.

29 May 2013: Jadranko Prlić, Bruno Stojić, Milivoj Petković, Valentin Ćorić, Slobodan Praljak, and Berislav Pušić are all found guilty of crimes against humanity, violations of the laws or customs of war, and grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions committed between 1992 and 1994. Their sentences range from 10 to 25 years’ imprisonment.

8 May 2013: The trial in the contempt of Tribunal case of Radislav Krstić is scheduled to begin on Tuesday, 28 May 2013.

17 April 2013: During a hearing on the Prosecution’s appeal against the acquittal of Radovan Karadzic for genocide in six municipalities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Prosecutor argues that the Trial Chamber should not have used the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard and instead just consider whether there was sufficient evidence that might lead to Karadzic’s conviction.

12 April 2013: The Appeals Chamber denies Sreten Lukić’s motion for provisional release, stating that he failed to demonstrate the existence of special circumstances as required by the Rules.

8 April 2013: Johan Tarčulovski is granted early release from prison in Germany.

8 April 2013: The trial of Goran Hadzic, former prime minister of the Serb Autonomous Region Eastern Slavonia, is adjourned until approximately 1 May 2013.

3 April 2013: The Tribunal announces that the Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav Šešelj will receive the judgment regarding his alleged crimes against non-Serbs in Croatia, Vojvodina, and Bosnia and Herzegovina on 30 October 2013

27 March 2013: The Trial Chamber pronounces its judgment sentencing Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin to 22 years of imprisonment for the crimes committed between April and December 1992 in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Mićo Stanišić, Minister of the Interior of Republika Srpska, was convicted of: persecution, a crime against humanity, through the underlying acts of killings; torture, cruel treatment, and inhumane acts; unlawful detention; establishment and perpetuation of inhumane living conditions; forcible transfer and deportation; plunder of property; and wanton destruction of towns and villages. He was also convicted of murder and torture as violations of the laws or customs of war. Stanišić was found not guilty of extermination as a crime against humanity. Stojan Župljanin, Chief of the Regional Security Services Centre of Banja Luka, was convicted of: persecution, a crime against humanity, through the underlying acts of killings; torture, cruel treatment, and inhumane acts; unlawful detention; establishment and perpetuation of inhumane living conditions; forcible transfer and deportation; and plunder of property; wanton destruction of towns and villages. He was also convicted of extermination as a crime against humanity and murder and torture as violations of the laws or customs of war.

27 March 2013: The Trial Chamber orders the prosecution of Radislav Krstić, former Commander of the Drina Corps of the Bosnian Serb Army (VRS), for contempt of the Tribunal for having refused to testify in the Karadžić́ case on several occasions.

26 March 2013: A public redacted version of the ICTY President’s decision granting the early release of Mladen Naletilić, effective on 18 February 2013, is filed.

22 March 2013: The Appeals Chamber announces it will hear the Prosecution’s appeal against the Trial Chamber’s decision of 17 April 2013 acquitting Radovan Karadžić́ of one count of genocide following the completion of the Prosecution’s presentation of evidence.

20 March 2013: The Trial Chamber grants Karadzić’s motion and issuesa subpoena against Slavko Puhalić, former Assistant Commander of Trnopolje camp, compelling him to testify for the Defence in this case.

18 March 2013: Judge William H. Sekule from the United Republic of Tanzania is sworn in as a new permanent Judge to the ICTY and assigned to the Appeals Chamber. Judge Sekule’s appointment brings the total of number of permanent ICTY Judges to nineteen.

18 March 2013: Former Republika Srpska president Radovan Karadzic asks the Trial Chamber to order the disclosure of the mental health reports on the former Krajina Serb political leader Milan Babic. According to the accused, the findings are relevant for the assessment of Babic’s credibility.  Babic’s testimony was admitted into evidence during the prosecution’s case at Karadzic’s trial. While he was testifying at Martic’s trial in March 2006, Milan Babic committed suicide in the Detention Unit.

15 March 2013: In the case of Sainovic, et al. (also known as the “Kosovo Four” case), the prosecution urges the Appeals Chamber to render the “severest sentence provided by the Tribunal’s Statute”: life imprisonment. According to the prosecution, the sentences imposed by the Trial Chamber – 22 and 15 years in prison – do not reflect the gravity of the crimes and the role played by the accused, who were senior Serbian officials.  In response, the defense lawyers argue that the request for life imprisonment is “impermissible, unethical and non-collegial.”  The accused also has an opportunity to address the judges.

28 February 2013: The Appeals Chamber reverses Momčilo Perišić’s convictions for crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war.  The Trial Chamber found Mr. Perišić guilty of aiding and abetting crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war committed between August 1993 and November 1995 in the Bosnian towns of Sarajevo and Srebrenica.  The Trial Chamber also found Mr. Perišić guilty as a superior for failing to punish crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war committed in the Croatian town of Zagreb on 2 and 3 May 1995. Mr. Perišić had been sentenced to 27 years of imprisonment.  The Appeals Chamber found that the Trial Chamber committed an error of law when it held that specific direction is not an element of aiding and abetting liability.

26 February 2013: The Chamber extends the provisional release of Jadranko Prlić until a date kept confidential.

26 February 2013: The Trial Chamber, hearing the case against Radovan Karadzic who is on trial for genocide and other crimes in Bosnia and Herzegovina, denies Karadzic’s motion in which he petitioned the Chamber to issue a subpoena to Fikret Abdic compelling him to give evidence in the defense case. In 1990, Abdic became a member of the BH Presidency as a nominee of the Party of Democratic Action.

25 February 2013: Media accreditation opens for the Appeal Judgement of Momčilo Perišić.

20 February 2013: Acting on a motion from the Defense in the Karadzic case, the Trial Chamber issues an order of safe conduct for witness Bozidar Vucurević, who is currently scheduled to testify for the Defense on 25 March 2013.

17 February 2013: Milan Gvero passes away. Gvero was one of six defence appellants in the Popović et al. case, who was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment on 10 June 2010 for crimes committed in the Srebrenica and Žepa enclaves. He was granted early release on 28 June 2010, pending the delivery of the Appeal Judgement. The question of the future of the appellate proceeding is a matter within the purview of the Appeals Chamber.

12 February 2013: The Trial Chamber orders the provisional release of Franko Simatović from “the first practicable day after 14 February 2013” until entry of trial judgment.

5 February 2013: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme has launched its second round of high school and university presentations in the former Yugoslavia. The project will allow the Tribunal to engage with young people across the region and stimulate their interest in the ICTY’s work and wider issues of transitional justice and post-conflict reconstruction.

7 February 2013:  The Appeals Chamber denies the latest Prosecution motion and affirms the provisional release for Popovic. 

31 January 2013:  The Appeals Chamber accepts the withdrawal of appeals by the Defense for Dragoljub Ojdanić and the Prosecution and declares the appellate proceedings to be concluded as they pertain to Ojdanić.  The Chamber rules that he be entitled to credit for the period already spent in detention.

29-31 January 2013:  The parties delivered closing arguments in the Stanistic & Simatovic case.  Judgment will be rendered “in due course.”

25 January 2013:  In the Karadzic case, the Trial Chamber orders the safe conduct of witness Aleksandar Vasiljević, former Head of the Security Department of the Yugoslav People's Army. The order was granted because of the pending indictment against the witness issued by Croatian authorities. The safe conduct order means that he "shall not be arrested, detained, prosecuted, or subjected to any other restriction, whether physical or legal, of his personal liberty, in respect of alleged acts or convictions prior to his departure from Serbia." It will be applied throughout the whole trip from Serbia to the Netherlands. His testimony is expected to take place in February 2013.

16 January 2013:  In the Popovic, et al. case, the Appeals Chamber revokes the suspension of appellate proceedings against Milan Gvero after finding that his health is good enough to allow him to participate in proceedings. 

23 September 2012: More than 650 members of the public visit the ICTY, which was opened to the public to celebrate the fifth annual “International Day,” organized by the Municipality of The Hague. The event included an opening address by ICTY President Judge Theodor Meron and guided tours of the Tribunal given by staff members. 

19 September 2012: The Trial Chamber orders Radovan Karadžić to present the totality of his evidence in 300 hours.  The Defense had requested a total of 600 hours for the presentation of its case, but the Trial Chamber determined that 300 hours would be sufficient based on a number of factors, including the time provided to the Defense to cross-examine Prosecution witnesses and the relevance of the anticipated evidence. 

15 September 2012: In the Stanišić & Simatović case, the Trial Chamber declares the Defense cases closed and orders the Prosecution to file a reasoned request for a rebuttal case, if any, by 24 September.

6 September 2012: Witness RM-032, who was testifying about the events in Kalinovik , testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

5-6 September 2012: Ivo Atlija, who was testifying about the events in the area of Prijedor, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

5 September 2012: Trial Chamber III orders Praljak to return to the UN Detention Unit in The Hague in the Prlić et al. case.

4-5 September 2012: Šefik Hurko, who was testifying about the events in the area of Rogatica, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

3-4 September 2012: Rajif Begić, who was testifying about the events in the area of Sanski Most, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

3 September 2012: The defense in the Karadžić case withdraws its motion to report Germany to the UN Security Council after German citizen Christoph von Bezold, who was a member of the European Community Monitoring Mission in Zagreb during the war, agreed to voluntarily submit to an interview by Karadžić’s legal advisors.

3 September 2012: The parties in the Karadžić case met before Trial Chamber III for a Status Conference.

3 September 2012: Safet Tači, who was detained at Keraterm and Trnopolje camps, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

31 August 2012: Adil Medić, who was a member of a commission visiting the Manjača camp, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

30-31 August 2012: Witness RM-018 testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case in closed session.

29-30 August 2012: Witness RM-010, who was testifying about the events in the area of Ključ, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

29 August 2012: Fejzija Hadžić, who is a survivor of the massacre in Kalinovik in 1992, testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

28 August 2012: John Jordan, who was a volunteer fireman in Sarajevo, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

27-28 August 2012: Witness Rm-147 testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case in closed session.

27 August 2012: Trial Chamber II grants a defense to extend the provisional release of Stanišić in the Stanišić and Župljanin case.

27 August 2012: Trial Chamber III modifies the provisional release conditions of Praljak and orders that he be confined to his residence in the Prlić et al. case.

27 August 2012: Witness RM-115, who was testifying about the events in Sarajevo, testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

23-24 August 2012: Colm Doyle, the European Community Monitoring Mission (ECMM) monitor in Bosnia and Herzegovina, testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

23 August 2012: The Appeals Chamber finds that the Accused in the Šešelj case has waived his right to appeal because he had not filed a notice of appeal and the appeal brief.  

23 August 2012: The parties in the Dordević case meet before Judge Agius for a Status Conference.

22 August 2012: The Registrar finds that the Accused, Slobodan Praljak, would bear the entirety of the cost of his defense in the Prlić case. This cost includes all funds that had been previous expended by the Tribunal and came to a total of $3,293,347.49 euros.

21-23 August 2012: The parties in the Tolimir case present their closing arguments to Trial Chamber II. The judgment will be pronounced in due course.

21-22 August 2012: Aernout Van Lynden, a Sky News reporter from Sarajevo, testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

21 August 2012: The Chamber denies Karadžić’s motion for a subpoena against Bill Clinton in order to interview him about the arms shipments to Bosnia and the US support to the Muslims and Croats in 1995.

17 August 2012: Mile Mrkšić was transferred yesterday to Portugal to serve his 20 year sentence for crimes committed against non-Serb prisoners of war. He was a senior officer and oversaw all Serb forces in the area. Mrkšić was sentenced on 27 September 2007 for aiding and abetting the murder, torture, and cruel treatment of prisoners, as well as the inhumane conditions of detention hanger.

20 July 2012:  Eelco Koster, a member of the Dutch Battalion, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

19 July 2012: Trial Chamber I decides not to call Witness CW-1 in the Stanišić and Simatović case, concluding that it would not be in the interest of justice due to cost and practical difficulties involved in arranging the testimony via video-link.  The Chamber also noted that there was a possibility that Witness CW-1 may refuse to testify and invoke his right not to answer questions so as to not incriminate himself and that further efforts to hear testimony from the witness would lead to considerable delay.

19 July 2012: Protected witness RM255, a survivor of executions at Branjevo Military Farm, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

18 and 19 July 2012: Joseph Kingori, a UN Military Observer who was present in Srebrenica between March 1995 and July 1995, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

17 July 2012: Trial Chamber I grants the Defense’s request to allow Simatović to be provisionally released into the custody of officials of the Government of Serbia from the conclusion of the presentation of evidence in his case until closing arguments. Simatović must remain in the city of Belgrade and return on or before 4 October 2012.

17 July 2012: Christina Schmitz, a Médecins Sans Frontiéres nurse who was a Field-Coordinator on a project in Srebrenica, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

16 July 2012: David Harland, the UNPROFOR Civil Affairs Officer in Sarajevo during the war in Bosnia, testifies for the prosecution in the Mladić case.

12 July 2012: The Mladıć trial is adjourned for two days due to Mladić’s ill health.

11 July 2012: Trial Chamber I decides that the final trial briefs in the Stanišić and Simatović case should be submitted by 21 September 2012. It also decides that the closing argument would be heard between the 9 and 11 October 2012.

10 July 2012: David Harland testifies as a witness in the Mladić case. Harland was the UNPROFOR Civil Affairs Officer in Sarajevo during the relevant period.

9 July 2012: Elvedin Pašić testifies as a witness in the Mladić case. Pašić testifies about the events in the area of Kotor Varoš during the relevant period.

5 July 2012: The parties in the Perišić case meet before Judge Meron for a Status Conference.

4 July 2012: Trial Chamber III denies the accused’s motion for some of the trial sessions to be held in the former Yugoslavia during the Defense’s case in the Karadžić trial.

28 June 2012: Trial Chamber II convicts Šešelj of contempt of the Tribunal and sentences him to two years in prison.

28 June 2012: In the Karadžić case, Trial Chamber III dismisses the accused’s motion for an acquittal on ten counts of the indictment, but grants his motion in relation to count one of genocide for the crimes allegedly committed between March and December 1992 in several municipalities of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

25 – 27 June 2012: The parties of the Haradinaj et al. case present closing arguments to Trial Chamber II. The judgment will be pronounced in due course.

22 June 2012: Trial Chamber II orders that the judgment in the third contempt case against Šešelj would be rendered on 28 June 2012.

18 June 2012: The trial in the Šešelj case concludes.

14 June 2012: The Appeals Chamber finds that Pavković failed to demonstrated the existence of special circumstances and dismisses his motion for provisional release in the Šainović et al. case.

14 June 2012: The parties in the Hadžić case meet before Judge Delvoie for a Status Conference.

13 June 2012: Trial Chamber III extends the provisional release of Praljak (the date is confidential) in the Prlić case.

12 June 2012: The parties in the Stanišić and Simatović case meet before Trial Chamber I for an administrative hearing.

11 June 2012: The accused in the Karadžić case makes his Rule 98bis submissions requesting acquittal on all counts of the indictment. The 98bis ruling will be announced on 28 June 2012.

7 June 2012: The parties in the Stanišić and Simatović case meet before Trial Chamber I for an administrative hearing. During the hearing, it was announced that the closing arguments in this case would be heard from 11 until 13 September 2012.

7 June 2012: Trial Chamber III extends the provisional release of Ćorić, Stojić, and Petković in the Prlić et al. case (the date is confidential).

6 June 2012: Trial Chamber III extends the provisional release of Prlić in the Prlić et al. case (the date is confidential).

6 June 2012: Trial Chamber II orders that Mićo Stanišić be provisionally released for three months, but stays the execution of this decision pending an appeal by the Prosecution.

6 June 2012: The Appeals Chamber finds that Pandurević failed to demonstrate the existence of special circumstances and therefore denies his motion for provisional release.

31 May 2012: The parties in the Popović et al. case meet before Judge Robinson for a Status Conference.

30 – 31 May 2012: The prosecution in the Stanišić and Simatović case recalls Radenko Novaković as a witness to testify. Navoković was a member of the Serbian State Security Service during the relevant period.

29 – 30 May 2012: Radivoje Mičić testifies as a defense witness in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Mičić was a member of the Serbian State Security Service during the relevant period. This was the last of Simatović defense witnesses.

29 May 2012: The parties begin presenting closing arguments in the Stanišić and Župljanin case. The judgment will be rendered in due course.

24 May 2012: Radivoje Mičić testifies as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Mičić was a member of the Serbian State Security Service during the relevant period.

24 May 2012: The parties in the Lukić and Lukić case meet before Judge Güney for a Status Conference.

24 May 2012: Trial Chamber I grants in part the Defense’s request in the Mladić case and postpones the start of the hearing of the Prosecution’s first witness until 25 June 2012.

23 May 2012: The parties in the Gotovina and Markač case meet before Judge Meron for a Status Conference.

22 May 2012: Rade Vujović begins testifying as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Vujović was a member of the Serbian State Security Service during the relevant period.

21 May 2012: In the Šešelj case, the Registrar files a public report that was submitted by a team of medical experts composed of three doctors from Sweden, Belgium, and Serbia. The report was on the compability of the accused’s detention at the UN Detention Unit with his health. The report found that the medical facilities at the Detention Unit are compatible with the health of Šešelj.

18 May 2012: Trial Chamber III orders that the accused present his Rule 98bis submissions on 11 June 2012 in the Karadžić case. The Prosecution will present its response on 13 June 2012.

16 – 17 May 2012: The Prosecution in the Mladić case makes its opening statement. The trial is then adjourned until further notice.

16 May 2012: The parties in the Šainović et al. case meet before Judge Liu for a Status Conference.

15 May 2012: Judge Meron denies the Defense motion for disqualification of Judge Orie and a stay of proceedings in the Mladić case.

14 – 15 May 2012: Dejan Plahuta testifies as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Plahuta was a soldier in the Užice Corps of the Yugoslav Army and then a member of the Serbian Ministry of Interior during the relevant period.

14 May 2012: The parties in the Gotovina and Markač case appear before the Appeals Chamber for the appeals hearing. The appeal judgment will be rendered in due course.

11 May 2012: The parties in the Dordević case meet before Judge Agius for a Status Conference.

10 May 2012: Dejan Plahuta testifies as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Plahuta was a soldier in the Užice Corps of the Yugoslav Army during the relevant period.

8 to 10 May 2012: Milan Milošević testifies as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Milošević was an expert witness testifying about the internal affairs and the security system of the former Yogoslavia and Serbia.

8 May 2012: Trial Chamber II orders that the parties to the Haradinaj et al. case file their final trial briefs no later than 11 June 2012 and that the closing arguments be heard on 25 and 26 June 2012.

8 May 2012: Trial Chamber I issues a public redacted version of its decision (from 10 April 2012) granting provisional release to Jovica Stanišić from 11 until 26 April 2012 in the Stanišić and Simatović case.

4 May 2012: Witness KDZ-071 testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Witness KDZ-071 was an eyewitness from Srebrenica. This was the last witness for the Prosecution. The trial is adjourned sine die.

3 May 2012: The parties in the Mladić case meet before Trial Chamber I for the pre-trial Conference. The Prosecution’s opening statement is scheduled to take place on 16 and 17 May 2012.

3 May 2012: Trial Chamber I denies the latest Defense requests for a 90 day adjournment of the start of trial in the Mladić case.

3 May 2012: Zoran Petrović-Piroćanac testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Petrović-Piroćanac was a Serbian journalist who filmed the Srebrenica events in July 1995.

2 May 2012: The parties in the Haradinaj et al. case meet before Judge Moloto for a Status Conference. During the Conference, it was confirmed that the final trial briefs would have to be filed before 11 June 2012 and that the closing arguments would be held on 25 and 26 June 2012.

1 – 3 May 2012: Milan Milošević testifies as a witness for the defense in the Stanišić and Simatović case. Milošević was an expert witness testifying about the internal affairs and the security system of the former Yugoslavia and Serbia.

1 – 2 May 2012: Ewa Tabeau testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Tabeau is an expert witness and a demographer.

26 April 2012: Trial Chamber III in the Karadžić case orders that: the Prosecution will call its last witness during the week of 4 May 2012; Karadzic will present his Rule 98bis submissions a week after the close of the Prosecution case; the Defense will file its list of witnesses and exhibits until 27 August 2012; a Status Conference will be held on 3 September 2012; the Pre-Defense Conference shall be held on 15 October 2012; and the Defense case will start on 16 October 2012.

25 – 26 April 2012: Ewa Tabeau testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Tabeau is an expert witness and a demographer.

25 April 2012: The Trial Chamber in the Stanišić and Župljanin case grants in part the motion by the Prosecution for an extension of time and orders that the parties file their final trial briefs no later than 14 May 2012 and that the closing arguments be heard from 29 May until 1 June 2012.

25 April 2012: Witness KDZ-320 testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Witness-320 is an eyewitness from Zvornik testifying in relation to the Srebrenica events.

24 April 2012: The parties in the Mladić case appear before Trial Chamber I for the Pre-Trial Conference. The Prosecution’s opening statement is scheduled to take place on 16 and 17 May 2012.

23 – 25 April 2012: Branko Derić testifies as a witness in the Karadžić case. Derić was the Prime Minister of Republika Srpska during the relevant period.

23 April 2012: Trial Chamber II notes that the Prosecution in the Haradinaj et al. case had closed its case on 20 April 2012 and ordered each accused to file written submissions, before 27 April 2012, indicating whether they intend to make Rule 98bis submissions and whether they intend to present a defense case. The next Status Conference is scheduled to take place on 2 May 2012.

23 April 2012: Richard Butler testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Butler is a military expert.

18 April 2012: The Registrar decides that Milan Lukić is eligible for full legal aid and informs him and his counsel that the costs relating to his defense would be borne by the Tribunal.

17 – 20 April 2012: Richard Butler testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Butler is a military expert.

17 April 2012: The accused in the Šešelj case pleads not guilty to the contempt charges in the new order in lieu of indictment, filed publicly on 5 April 2012.

12 April 2012: Tomislav Premović testifies as a witness for the Prosecution in the Karadžić case. Premović is an expat Serb who met the accused in July 1995.

11 April 2012: Tomasz Blaszczyk testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Blaszczyk is an investigator in the Office of the Prosecutor of the ICTY.

11 April 2012: Witness KDZ-084 testifies as a witness for the prosecution in a closed session in the Karadžić case.

10 April 2012: The Defense of Perišić files a new public redacted version of its appeal brief against the sentence.

10 April 2012: Amor Mašović testifies as a witness for the prosecution in the Karadžić case. Mašović is one of the directors of the Missing Persons Institute of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

4 April 2012: Trial Chamber I grants in part the Defense’s motion in the Stanišić and Simatović case and ordered that Simatović be provisionally released (on the first practicable day following the filing of this decision) until 26 April 2012.

4 April 2012: The Appeals Chamber orders that the appeal hearing take place on 14 May 2012 in the Gotovina and Markać case.

4 April 2012: The Appeals Chamber grants the Defense’s motion in the Jelena Rašić case and orders that Rašić be provisionally released (as soon as practicable) pending the disposition of the appeals.

30 March 2012:Trial Chamber II orders the parties to the Stanisic & Zupljanin case to file their final trial briefs by 7 May 2012, and announces that closing arguments will be heard from 21-24 May 2012.

29 March 2012:The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme launches a round of multimedia presentations at high schools in Croatia. As part of this region-wide project, theTribunal is seeking to support the process of reconciliation in the region by encouraging young people to take an active interest in the Tribunal’s work and achievements as well as wider issues of justice, transitional justice mechanisms and post-conflict social recovery.

29 March 2012: The accused and parties to the Mladic case meet before Judge Orie for a Status Conference. The Judge announces that a Pre-Trial Conference will be held on 24 April 2012.

28 March 2012: The Tribunal's President, Theodor Meron, takes part in a delegation to Washington, DC this week along with the President of the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice. The purpose of the trip is to inform the public about role of international courts and tribunals in The Hague.

26-29 March 2012: Witness testimonies take place in the Karadzic case, in continuation of the Prosecution case.

26-28 March 2012: Witness testimonies and administrative hearings take place in the Stanisic & Simatovic case, in continuation of the Defense case.

26 March 2012: The Defense team in the Jelena Rasic contempt case files its appeal brief against the judgment.

22 March 2012: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme publishes its Annual Report for 2011. The report highlights the activities and achievements of the programme reflecting its enhanced outreach strategy. In particular, the report highlights the Tribunal’s youth outreach project, in which 3,000 young people from high schools and universities across the former Yugoslavia reflect with the ICTY officials on the Tribunal's contribution to justice in their communities.

20 March 2012:The Tribunal hosts a two-day study visit of twelve students of Law and Political Science from universities in Serbia, organized in cooperation with the Organisation of Security and Cooperation (OSCE) Mission to Serbia.The visit forms part of the Outreach Program’s efforts to contribute to the process of dealing with the past by encouraging young people to take an active interest in the Tribunal’s work and achievements as well as wider issues of justice, transitional justice mechanisms, and post-conflict social recovery.

13 March 2012: The Tribunal launches an Outreach Program to reach out to university students across the former Yugoslavia. The first round of presentations takes place in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia with students of law, political science, and security studies attending lectures by John Cubbon, the Senior Legal Office in the Tribunal's Chambers. He presents on the work of the Tribunal, its jurisprudence, and its impact on the development of the rule of law in the former Yugoslavia. Similar presentations will be held in the coming weeks and months across Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Kosovo.

12 March 2012: The Trial Chamber asks for a new medical examination to be conducted on VojislavŠešelj, after his recent hospitalization, to assess whether his health condition is compatible with the regime in the Tribunal's Detention Unit. Šešelj's third contempt of court case has been scheduled for Monday 19 March for failing to remove confidential information from his personal website in violation of the Chamber's orders.

7 March 2012: As the case against VojislavŠešeljcomes to a close, prosecutors seek a 28-year prison term for the head of the Serbian Radical Party. Šešelj, whose case opened in November 2007 but has been delayed several times due to contempt of court convictions, is indicted for atrocities committed during the 1991-1993 wars in the Balkans.

6 March 2012: Judge Khalida Rashid Khan is sworn in as a new permanent Judge to the Appeals Chamber of the ICTY. She was formerly the President of the ICTR.

5 March 2012: The Tribunal's Outreach Programme welcomes a group of war crime trial monitors and journalists from Croatia on a week-long study visit. The visit is organised by Croatian NGO Documenta Centre for Dealing with the Past as part of its long-term work with local communities to encourage the establishment and acceptance of facts about the war in the former Yugoslavia.

5 March 2012: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme launches a new round of presentations at high schools in Kosovo for the 2011 – 2012 school year and held its first presentation at the Economic and Law High School "H.K. Prishtina" in Pristina. Through this region-wide project, launched on 14 December in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Tribunal is seeking to support the process of reconciliation in the region by encouraging young people to take an active interest in issues of justice, transitional justice mechanisms, post-conflict social recovery and the ICTY’s mission.

2 March 2012: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme holds the premiere of its feature-length documentary "Sexual Violence and the Triumph of Justice" in Zagreb, Croatia. The event is attended by some 80 guests, among whom are Croatian government authorities, members of academia, Embassy and NGO representatives as well as journalists. The documentary depicts the Tribunal’s historic role in the prosecution and adjudication of wartime sexual violence. The documentary includes interviews with former and current senior staff members of the ICTY, as well as testimonies from witnesses and survivors of sexual violence, who bravely gave evidence at trials.

1 March 2012: The ICTY plays host to a group of thirty-two NGO representatives from the former Yugoslavia as part of a study tour on justice and reconciliation.

29 February 2012: The UN Secretary-General appoints Judge Theodor Meron as president of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals for a term of four years effective 1 March 2012. Judge Meron has been serving as the president of the ICTY since November 2011, a position that he will continue to hold while performing his functions at the Residual Mechanism.

27 February 2011: The Tribunal announces that closing arguments in the trial of Vojislav Šešelj will commence on 5 March with the Prosecution presenting its closing until 7 March and the Defense will present it closing arguments from 12 through 15 March. Šešelj, the leader of the Serbian Radical Party, has been on trial since November 2007.

23 February 2011: Ratko Mladić, on trial in the ICTY for 11 charges including genocide, lashes out at Judge Alphons Orie and accuses the Tribunal of being biased against him because he has not been allowed to wear his military uniform. Mladić, who denies the charges against him, accuses the UN court of being a biased NATO court.

22 February 2011: Milan Tupajić is sentenced to 2 months' imprisonment for refusing to appear as a witness in the trial of Radovan Karadžić. The Trial Chamber finds that by failing to testify he deprived the court of relevant evidence in the Karadžić case.

21 February 2011: The Tribunal refuses a Belgrade court's request to allow former Bosnian Serb general Ratko Mladić to testify in the trial of 10 people accused of aiding and sheltering him between 2002 and 2005. Mladić is currently on trial for genocide in the ICTY.

17 February 2012: A status conference is held in the case of Goran Hadzic, former president of the self-proclaimed Republic of Serbian Krajina. At his further initial appearance in August 2011, he pleaded not guilty to charges for crimes against humanity and war crimes, alleged committed in eastern Slavonia, Croatia, between 1991 and 1993.

15 February 2012: The ICTY sets 14 May 2012 as the start date for the trial of Ratko Mladić. As former commander of the Bosnian Serb Army, Mladić is charged with genocide, and a multitude of crimes including carrying out the Srebrenica massacre and shelling and sniping Sarajevo during the siege. The defense had previously requested a delay in the start of the trial from 27 March 2012 to October. The Trial Chamber concluded that 14 May is sufficient time to allow the parties to complete pre-trial preparations.

14 February 2012: The Appeals Chamber in the Gotovina and Markac case issues a decision denying an application and proposed amicus brief filed in January by twelve specialists in international humanitarian law. The brief requested that the Chamber reconsider certain Trial Chamber findings concerning unlawful artillery attacks. The Chamber found that brief would not assist in determining the issues on appeal because it repeats the work of both Trial Chamber and the appeal briefs of the parties.

14 February 2012: The Trial Chamber orders the parties in the Zdravko Tolimir trial to submit their final briefs by 31 May 2012. The trial began in February 2010 and the prosecution completed its case in January 2012. The Trial Chamber is currently hearing the testimony of the final defense witness. The Prosecution’s closing arguments are scheduled for 21 August 2012. Tolimir, a former high-raking member of the Bosnian Serb Army, is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

7 February 2012: Trial Chamber III sentences Jelena Rašić to one year of imprisonment for contempt of the Tribunal, ruling that the last 8 months of her sentence are to be suspended for a period of two years. The Chamber took into account the difficult circumstances due to the fact that she is the only female detainee in the United Nations Detention Unit, her health condition, her comparably young age, and the fact that this is the first time she has received a prison sentence.

6 February 2012: The ICTY Staff Union and European partners launch the EU Commission project, “Supporting the Needs of Vulnerable Employees” (SNOVE). The program is meant to support and educate vulnerable staff members of retirement age, those who possess highly specialized sets of skills, or those who will be reentering countries with high unemployment rates.

1 February 2012: Prosecutor Serge Brammertz meets Valentin Inzko, High Representative for the BiH, in The Hague. They discuss the challenges of the prosecution of war crimes in BiH, and the Prosecutor thanks the High Representative for the support of his Office in relation to the implementation of the ICTY's mandate in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

31 January 2012: The Trial Chamber accepts the plea agreement in the trial of Jelena Rašić for contempt of court. She plead guilty to all five counts of contempt, including knowingly and willingly interfering with the Tribunal’s administration of justice by procuring false witnesses while she was on the defense team of Milan Lukić.

30 January 2012: The ICTY announces that the trial of Milan Tupajić will begin on Friday, 3 February. Tupajić is charged with contempt of court for failing to testify in the trial of Radovan Karadžić. He was subpoenaed twice and failed to appear before the Court. Tupajić was arrested on 31 December 2011.

25 January 2012: The ICTY announces that in the case of Vojislav Šešelj, an administrative hearing will be held on 7 February to discuss the health of the accused. Šešelj, who is accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity, has been on trial since 2007. He has recently been transferred twice to the hospital as a precautionary measure and then returned to the UN detention facility. Šešelj has refused to allow the ICTY access to the details of his medical treatment.

21 January 2011: The Office of the Prosecutor welcomes the arrest of Radovan Stanković, former member of the Serb paramilitary forces. Stanković was indicted by the ICTY for crimes against humanity and war crimes and was later transferred to BiH where he was convicted and serving a 20 year sentence. In May 2007 Stanković escaped from prison. The Prosecutor said that today's arrest reflects an increased commitment by the authorities in BiH of bringing perpetrators of grave crimes to justice.

20 January 2011: The trial of Jelena Rašić, originally scheduled to start 23 January, has been postponed indefinitely. Rasic was a member of Milan Lukić's defense team and is charged with contempt of the Tribunal for procuring false witness statements.

19 January 2011: Ratko Mladić, former Bosnian military commander, asks for a delay in the opening of his trial, set to begin on 27 March. Mladić's lawyer says it would be impossible for the defense to examine hundreds of thousands of pages of evidence before the end of October. Mladić is charged with 11 counts of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity including the atrocities committed in the Siege of Sarajevo and the Srebrenica massacre. Judge Alphons Orie says that the Tribunal has yet to make a final decision on the date.

19 January 2011: The United Nations Secretary-General appoints Mr. John Hocking, Registrar or the ICTY, as the Registrar of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals. Mr. Hocking will continue to hold both positions. The Residual Mechanism will be a UN body designed to carry out the essential residual functions of the ICTY and ICTR once they have completed their mandates.

18 January 2011: The case of Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin adjourns until further notice pending a decision on the future course of the trial.

10 January 2011: The trial of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović resumes with the continued testimony of a protected defense witness who is testifying about the events in the Serb Autonomous region during the period relevant to the indictment. The defendants are charged with four counts of crimes against humanity including persecutions, deportations and inhumane acts and one count of war crimes.

10 January 2011: The case of Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin resumes. Mirza Lišinović, a former police inspector in Doboj, BiH, testifies as the first witness for the Prosecution's rebuttal after the Defense closed its case in December. Another Prosecution witness is expected to take the stand. The defendants are charged with various crimes against humanity including persecutions, murder, torture and inhumane acts as well as several war crimes.

10 January 2011: The trial of Radovan Karadžić resumes today with testimony from Freddy Peccerelli, a forensic anthropologist. The Prosecution is in the final phase of its case, covering the crimes committed in Srebrenica following the completion of the Sarajevo, hostages and municipalities phases. Karadžić is accused of war crimes committed in the Siege of Sarajevo and the ordering and execution of the Srebrenica massacre.

10 January 2011: As part of the ICTY's Outreach Program, the Tribunal donates a significant amount of books to the Law Faculty of Zagreb University in Croatia. The outreach program aims to encourage the rule of law across the region. The work of the Tribunal also resumes today after the holiday break.

9 January 2011: ICTY spokesperson Nerma Jelacic confirms that Vojislav Šešelj is in stable health after receiving medical care in a Dutch hospital. His location and health data are confidential information according to international standards. Šešelj is on trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed as leader of the Serb Radical Party. Šešelj has also been twice convicted of contempt of court.

16 December 2011: Milan Tupajic’s initial appearance is held. Tupajic, former chief of the crisis staff and president of the Serb municipality of Sokolac, has been charged with contempt of the Tribunal for failing to comply with, or to show good cause why he could not comply with, two subpoenas in which he was ordered to testify in the case of Radovan Karadzic. Tupajic was arrested by Bosnian authorities on Tuesday 13 December 2011.

16 December 2011: The ICTY website launches a dedicated web feature to provide a better understanding of the role and functions of the future Residual Mechanism of the Tribunal. The latter will be a unique UN body set up to continue the important work that will need to be carried out once the Tribunal completes its mandate. It will be responsible for continuing the Tribunal’s “jurisdiction, rights and obligations and essential functions” and maintaining its legacy.

14 December 2011: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme launches a region-wide effort to reach out to young people at high schools in the former Yugoslavia. Through a series of multi-media presentations, the Tribunal is seeking to support the process of reconciliation in the region by encouraging young people to take an active interest in issues of justice, transitional justice mechanisms, post-conflict social recovery and the ICTY’s mission.

13 December 2011: Video recordings of all panel discussions that took place during the ICTY Global Legacy Conference are made available online in English, French and Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. The Conference, held in November, brought together over 350 leading academics, international judges and practitioners, state representatives and members of civil society, who explored the impact of the Tribunal’s work on international humanitarian law, international criminal procedure and the potential of its jurisprudence to shape the future of global justice and the advancement of human rights.

9 December 2011: Trial Chamber II, by majority with Judge Nyambe dissenting, convicted Dragomir Pecanac of contempt of the Tribunal and sentenced him to three months of imprisonment. The former Security and Intelligence Officer of the Main Staff of the Army of the Republika Srpska was found guilty of having knowingly and wilfully interfered with the administration of justice by failing to appear before the Chamber as ordered or to show good cause why he could not comply with a subpoena ordering him to appear as a witness in the case of Zdravko Tolimir.

8 December 2011: The Tribunal’s President Judge Theodor Meron addresses the UN Security Council to provide an update on the Tribunal’s achievements and works. He noted that of the 15 cases currently ongoing, 2 are in the pre-trial phase, 7 at trial, and 6 at the appeal stage, adding that the “Tribunal continues to work as rapidly as possible, given the constraints imposed by limited resources and the need to assure the highest standards of procedural fairness.”

7 December 2011: ICTY Prosecutor Serge Brammertz addresses the UN Security Council, delivering the 16th report on the progress of his Office towards the completion of its mandate. He identified the arrest of the Tribunal’s last fugitive, Goran Hadzic, in July 2011, as the major development during for the this reporting period. Hadzic was the last of the 181 persons indicted by the ICTY remaining at large. The Prosecutor also stated that the cooperation of States, in particular form the former Yugoslavia, remains essential as long as there are ongoing cases.

5 December 2011: The Tribunal delivers approximately 700 pages of trial transcripts in local languages to judicial authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are meant to enhance the ability of national legal practitioners to access and utilize testimony before the ICTY.

2 December 2011: The Trial Chamber adopts the Prosecution’s proposal to limit its presentation of evidence to a selection of 106, as opposed to 196 initially scheduled crimes in Ratko Mladic’s indictment, and to 15 municipalities instead of 13.

28 November 2011: The contempt of court trial of Dragomir Pecanac, former Security and Intelligence Officer of the Main Staff of the Army of the Republika Srpska, begins in Courtroom III. Pecanac is charged with contempt of the Tribunal for failing to comply with, or to show good cause why he could not comply with, a subpoena in which he was ordered to testify in the case of Zdravko Tolimir. 

15-16 November 2011: The ICTY convenes a two-day conference in The Hague, “The Global Legacy of the ICTY.” Academics, international judges, practitioners, state representatives, and members of civil society explore the impact of the Tribunal’s work on international humanitarian law and international criminal procedure, as well as the potential of its jurisprudence to shape the future of global justice and the advancements of human rights.

11 November 2011: The ICTY President, Judge Robinson, presents the Tribunal’s eighteenth annual report to the UN General Assembly. He reports on progress made in ongoing cases and highlights that proceedings have been concluded against 126 of the 161 persons indicted by the Tribunal. The President calls upon Member States to support the establishment of a victims’ trust fund. He reports that the Tribunal has continued to take all possible measures to expedite its trials, without sacrificing due process, by continually introducing a variety of reforms in order to improve its work.

10 November 2011: Ljubomir Borovčanin, former Deputy Commander of the Republika Srpska Ministry of Internal Affairs (MUP) Special Police Brigade, is the fourth convicted person to be transferred to Denmark to serve his 17-year sentence. Borovčanin is one of seven defendants convicted in the Popovic et al. case who was found guilty on 10 June 2010 for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims during and following the fall of the Srebrenica and Žepa enclaves (BiH) in July 1995.

8 November 2011: In the appeals case of Momčilo Perišić, the Accused files his notice of appeal against the Trial Chamber Judgment rendered on 6 September 2011. Perišić, a former Chief of the General Staff of the Yugoslav Army, was sentenced to 27 years of imprisonment after being found guilty of aiding and abetting murders, inhumane acts, persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds, and attacks on civilians in Sarajevo and Srebrenica.

4 November 2011: ICTY defendant Vojislav Šešelj declines to enter a plea for the second time in his third contempt case before the Tribunal. He claims that the Registrar’s decision to monitor his communications with his legal associates has left him without legal assistance. The Registrar had found that Šešelj abused channels of unmonitored communication and disclosed confidential information on his website in violation of judicial orders.

1 November 2011: ICTY Prosecutor Serge Brammertz and the head of the OSCE Mission to BiH announce that successful completion of 11bis mechanism in BiH will allow the court to transfer mid- and lower-level defendants back to the countries of the region for prosecution. The Rule 11bis Monitoring Project allows the ICTY to ensure that defendants will be prosecuted in line with international standards.

1 November 2011: The ICTY Trial Chamber announces that closing arguments in the case of Vojislav Šešelj will take place on 5 March 2012. The Prosecution and the Accused have each been allotted 10 hours to deliver closing arguments. Šešelj's trial commenced on 7 November 2007. He is accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in BiH, Croatia, and Serbia during his time as leader of the Serbian Radical Party from 1991 to 1994.

31 October 2011: The ICTY Trial Chamber II sentences Vojislav Šešelj to 18 months for contempt of court for disclosing confidential information including names, occupations, and places of residence of protected witnesses in a book he authored. This is the second contempt of court case against Šešelj. On 19 May 2010, he was sentenced to 15 months imprisonment for contempt of court. Šešelj's third trial for contempt is currently underway.

26 October 2011: Proceedings in the retrial of Ramush Haradinaj and others resume this morning in Courtroom I.

19 October 2011: The ICTY judges elect, by acclamation in a special plenary, Judge Theodor Meron (USA) as President of the Tribunal and Judge Carmel Agium (Malta) as Vice-President  starting 17 November 2011, to succeed President Patrick Robson and Vice President O-Gon Kwon.

19 October 2011: Dragomir Pećanac, former Security and Intelligence Officer of the Main Staff of the Army of the Republika Srpska, pleads not guilty to charges of contempt of the Tribunal at his further initial appearance. Pećanac has been charged with for failing to comply with, or to show good cause why he could not comply with, a subpoena in which he was ordered to testify in the case of Zdravko Tolimir. A date for the start of trial will be scheduled in due course.

17 October 2011: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme hosts a group of seventeen human and minority rights professionals from the Serbian Ministry for Human & Minority Rights, Public Administration and Local Self-Government on a two-day study visit to the ICTY.

13 October 2011: The Trial Chamber denies the Prosecution’s request to sever the indictment against Ratko Mladić, the former commander of the Bosnian Serb forces. On 16 August, the Prosecution filed a motion to conduct two separate trials against Mladić, one pertaining to crimes in Srebrenica and the second pertaining to Sarajevo and other municipalities in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In its decision, the Chamber says that granting this motion would prejudice the Accused, render trial less manageable and efficient and burden witnesses. The Trial Chamber, however, grants the Prosecution’s request to add the crimes committed in Bišina, a village in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, to the charges against Mladić.

12 October 2011: The Trial Chamber is currently hearing testimony from Milorad Leković, a former chief of the Belgrade centre of the Serbian State Security Service. Leković is testifying via video link in the trial of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović. Stanišić, the former head of the Serbian State Security Service (DB), and Simatović, a commander of the Special Operations Unit of the DB, are charged with a joint criminal enterprise to permanently remove the majority of non-Serbs, principally Croats, Bosnian Muslims and Bosnian Croats, from large areas of Croatia and BiH.

12 October 2011: In the proceedings against Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin the Trial Chamber hears the testimony of Miloš Janković. Janković is a former police office and the Chief of the Communications department of the Prijedor police station in 1992. The testimony will last all week. Stanišić and Župljanin have been charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes for their roles as Serbian Ministry of Internal Affairs in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Chief of the Regional Security Services Centre in north-western Bosnia and Herzegovina, respectively.

11 October 2011: The Tribunal’s Communications Service launches a new web feature on the legal aid provided by the ICTY to the accused standing trial. The feature outlines the methods the ICTY uses to determine the financial status of the accused and the level of funding required for their defense.

10 October 2011: Dragomir Pećanac, former Security and Intelligence Officer of the Main Staff of the Army of the Republika Srpska, is charged with contempt of the Tribunal for failing to comply with, or to show good cause why he could not comply with, a subpoena in which he was ordered to testify in the case of Zdravko Tolimir.

5 October 2011: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme welcomes a group of six judges and five prosecutors from Kosovo for a two-day study visit, as part of the Tribunal’s ongoing efforts to strengthen cooperation and knowledge sharing with members of the judiciary in the former Yugoslavia.

4 October 2011: The court announces that the trial of Jelena Rašić will begin on Monday, 9 January 2012. Rašić, formerly a member of Milan Lukić’s defense team, is charged with contempt of court for allegedly procuring a false witness statement in exchange for cash in the Lukić case.

29 September 2011: The ICTY Trial Chamber rejects Vojislav Šešelj's request to discontinue proceedings in his case saying that he failed to prove that his right to trial within a reasonable period has been violated. Šešelj has been in detention since 2003 and is being tried on 14 counts of crimes against humanity and violations of laws or customs of war.

28 September 2011: The Tribunal’s President, Judge Patrick Robinson, issues a decision not to grant early release to Shefqet Kabashi. Kabashi was sentenced to 2 months imprisonment for contempt of the Tribunal on 16 September. President Robinson stated that Kabashi’s actions deprived the Trial Chamber in the trail of Ramush Haradinaj of evidence “relevant for an effective ascertainment of truth in the adjudication of [the] case” and posed a threat to the effective functioning of the Tribunal.

28 September 2011: A Status Conference is held in the appeal case of Ante Gotovina and Mladen Markac in Courtroom III.

27 September 2011: Proceedings in the trial of Radovan Karadžić resume today. Karadžić is charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity for his involvement in the Siege of Sarajevo and the Srebrenica massacre.

27 September 2011: The re-trial of former Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj continues. The trial chamber hears the testimony of Witness 77 who is testifying about the activities of the Armed Forces of Kosovo (FARK).

27 September 2011: A group of witness support professionals from Croatia visit the Tribunal’s Victims and Witnesses Section as part of the Tribunal’s Outreach Programme in an effort to increase knowledge sharing and cooperation.

21 September 2011: The Trial Chamber rules that the defense case of Zdravko Tolimir will start on Tuesday, 10 January 2012, when the Accused will be given an opportunity to make his opening statement. A former high ranking official of the Bosnian Serb Army (VRS), he is charged with genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war committed between July and November 1995 against Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica and Žepa, BiH.

20 September 2011: The Tribunal completes a two-day “training of trainers” course with 8 trainers and educators from judicial bodies in the Federation of BiH and Republika Srpska as part of the War Crimes Justice Project (WCJP).

18 September 2011: More than 750 members of the public attend an International Open Day at the Tribunal. The ICTY welcomed the event as an opportunity to educate the public about its mandate and functioning and showcase its achievements.

16 September 2011: ICTY judges sentence Shefqet Kabashi to two months in prison for contempt of court for refusing to answer questions during a 2007 trial regarding Kosovo. On 26 August, Kabashi pled guilty to knowingly and willfully interfering with the tribunal’s administration of justice. He was supposed to be a witness in the re-trial of former Kosovo Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj, charged with crimes against humanity for his actions as commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army.

15 September 2011: Proceedings in the trial of Radovan Karadžić resume. Karadžić is charged with eleven counts of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role in the war in Bosnia, including the siege of Sarajevo and the Srebrenica massacre.

14 September 2011: The UN Security Council unanimously passes resolution 2007 (2011) to reappoint Serge Brammertz as chief prosecutor for the ICTY until 31 December 2014. The resolution calls on the tribunal to “take all possible measures” to expeditiously complete all remaining work no later than that date.

14 September 2011: The appeals hearing for cousins Milan and Sredoje Lukić begins. Milan was sentenced to life and Sredoje to 30 years imprisonment for what the ICTY said were examples “the worst acts of inhumanity”. They are appealing due to what they call certain oversights the court made regarding identification of Milan Lukić.

14 September 2011: The Court announces that judgment in the contempt of court case of Shefqet Kabashi will be rendered on 16 September 2010.

13 September 2011: The Tribunal delivers 1700 pages of trial transcripts in Bosnia/Croatian/Serbian to judicial authorities in BiH and Serbia, as part of the War Crimes Justice Project (WCJP). The WCJP seeks to improve the ability of legal practitioners in the region to access and utilize testimony given before the ICTY and will produce approx. 60,000 pages of ICTY trail transcripts before its completion in October 2011.

12/13 September 2011: Serge Brammertz, Prosecutor of the ICTY, was in Belgrade on 12 and 13 September 2011 and met with President Boris Tadić during a working visit.

7/8 September 2011: The trials of Radovan Karadžić and Zdravko Tolimir continue with hearings of protected witnesses.

7 September 2011: In the Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin trial, the Chamber is currently hearing defense witness military expert Vidosav Kovačević, who is testifying about police work during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1992.

6 September 2011: Trial Chamber I convicts Momčilo Perišić, a former Chief of the General Staff of the Yugoslav Army, for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in BiH and Croatia and sentenced him to 27 years of imprisonment. Perišić was Chief of the General Staff of the Yugoslav Army (between 26 August 1993 – 24 November 1998) and is the most senior officer to be found guilty (by majority) of: aiding and abetting murders, inhumane acts, persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds, and attacks on civilians in Sarajevo and Srebernica; failing to punish his subordinates for their crimes of murder, attacks on civilians and injuring and wounding civilians during rocket attacks on Zagreb on 2-3 May 1995. Unanimously acquitted of charges of aiding and abetting extermination as a crime against humanity in Srebernica and of command responsibility in relation to crimes in Sarajevo and Srebernica.

5 September 2011: Trials of Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin resume with the start of Župljanin’s Defence case.

1 September 2011: The first set of trial transcripts transcribed into local languages is made available on the Tribunal’s Bosnian/Serbian/Croatian website, as part of the Tribunal’s commitment to ensuring judicial transparency and the accessibility of its public records.

26 August 2011: Shefqet Kabashi, a former member of the KLA, pleads guilty to charges of contempt of court at his further initial appearance. Kabashi is a key prosecution witness in the re-trial of Ramush Haradinaj et al. on six counts of an indictment relating to the torture and murder of prisoners in the KLA-run camp in Jablanica/Jabllanice. Kabashi was charged with contempt of court in 2007 after refusing or failing to answer questions while testifying and was arrested and transferred to the Tribunal’s custody on 17-18 August 2011.

17 August 2011: Proceedings resume this week in the cases of Radovan Karadžić, with testimony of 88th Prosecution (protected) witness, and Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović, with testimony of a defense protected witness in closed session.

25 July 2011: Goran Hadžić makes his initial appearance before the ICTY, declining to enter a plea on the charges against him.  Judge Kwon O-gon adjourned the proceedings for thirty days, at which point the accused will be required to enter a plea, or a plea of not guilty will be entered for him.  

22 July 2011: Former Croatian Serb president Goran Hadžić is transferred to United Nations Detention Center in The Hague.  

20 July 2011: Former Croatian Serb president Goran Hadžić is arrested in Serbia. Initially indicted in 2004, Hadžić was the last remaining fugitive sought by the ICTY.

19 July 2011:  The Appeals Chamber of the ICTY upholds the contempt conviction of Florence Hartmann, who served as a prosecution spokesperson at the ICTY.  Hartmann was initially convicted in September 2009 on the basis of charges that she disclosed confidential information relating to the Milošević trial, in violation of a court order.  The Appeals Chamber also upheld the €7,000 fine against Hartmann.

7 July 2011:  Johan Tarčulovski, a former police officer of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), is transferred to Germany to serve his twelve-year sentence for crimes committed against ethnic Albanians during the conflict in FYROM in 2001.  Tarčulovski’s conviction was affirmed by the Appeals Chamber on 19 May 2010, as was the acquittal on all counts of his co-accused, Ljube Boškoski.  The case against Tarčulovski and Boškoski is the only case involving crimes allegedly committed in FYROM to be heard by the ICTY.

4 July 2011: Ratko Mladić re-appears before the ICTY following a thirty-day adjournment to allow him to consider the eleven charges against him and whether he wished to enter a plea.  The former Bosnian Serb general again refused to enter a plea and, after several outbursts, Presiding Judge Alphons Orie removed him from the courtroom.  The judge then formally entered a plea of not guilty on behalf of Mladić pursuant to ICTY rules.

27 June 2011:  ICTY Judges Fausto Pocar and Bakone Justice Moloto meet in Bečići, Montenegro, with approximately twenty judges from Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to share their experiences in adjudicating war crimes cases.  The meeting is part of the War Crimes Justice Project, which is aimed at sharing the ICTY’s institutional knowledge and specialized skills with lawyers and judges involved in the prosecution of war crimes cases in the former Yugoslavia.

20 June 2011:  The ICTY begins a two-day training session with twenty legal professionals from the Basic Court Skopje 1, the Appellate Court, and the Basic Prosecutor’s Office for Organised Crime from Skopje.  The training, which is taking place in Skopje, is part of the War Crimes Justice Project, which is aimed at sharing the ICTY’s institutional knowledge and specialized skills with lawyers and judges involved in the prosecution of war crimes cases in the former Yugoslavia.

16 June 2011:  The ICTY begins a two-day training session with legal professionals from several of Bosnia’s cantonal prosecutor’s offices, including Široki Brijeg, Mostar, Trebinje, Goražde, and Sarajevo, as well as legal staff from Brčko District, the Court of BiH and the Office of the Prosecutor of BiH, as part of the War Crimes Justice Project.  The aim of the War Crimes Justice Project is to share the ICTY’s institutional knowledge and specialized skills with lawyers and judges involved in the prosecution of war crimes cases in the former Yugoslavia.

13 June 2011:  Mladjo Radić, a former guard at the Omarska detention camp in Bosnia who was convicted by the ICTY for war crimes and crimes against humanity, submits a request for early release from the French prison where he is serving a 20-year sentence.  In the submission, Radic’s lawyers state that, as of August, Radić will have served two-thirds of his sentence, and that under French law, he is eligible for release if he has served more than half of his sentence.  An earlier request for release, submitted in April 2010, was rejected by the President of the Tribunal, who cited to the “high gravity” of Radić’s crimes and the fact that he continues to deny responsibility for his crimes. 

13 June 2011:  The Outreach Programme of the ICTY announces that it has released a new feature on the prosecution of the crimes of sexual violence, which “describes the enormous contribution the Tribunal made to the prosecution and adjudication of crimes of this nature.”

6 June 2011:  ICTY Prosecutor Serge Brammertz addresses the UN Security Council, delivering the Office of the Prosecutor’s fifteenth report on its progress towards the completion of its mandate.  Among the topics addressed in Brammertz’s update were the arrest of Ratko Mladić on 26 May 2011; ongoing efforts to arrest the Tribunal’s remaining fugitive, Goran Hadžić, and the progress to date in the Tribunal’s ongoing trials and appeals.

6 June 2011:  The President of the ICTY, Judge Patrick Robinson, addresses the UN Security Council on the work of the Tribunal, describing challenges faced by the Tribunal over the past six months and the achievements made in the implementation of its completion strategy.  Of the seven ongoing trial, President Robinson stated that one is expected to conclude this year and six will conclude in 2012.  The case of Radovan Karadžić is expected to be completed in 2014.

3 June 2011: Ratko Mladić makes his first appearance before the ICTY, but refused to enter a plea on any of the eleven charges against him.  Mladić told the judges that he was “gravely ill,” and the Chamber briefly went into closed session to discuss the accused’s health issues.  Judge Orie set 4 July 4 for the next hearing, at which point Mladić will be required to enter a plea on the charges, or an automatic not-guilty plea will be entered on his behalf.

31 May 2011: Ratko Mladić is transferred to the Tribunal’s custody, after having been at large for almost sixteen years. Mladić will be held at the UN Detention Unit in The Hague.

27 May 2011:  The ICTY announces that the Trial Chamber appointed to hear the case against Ratko Mladić is composed of Judge Christoph Flügge, Judge Alphons Orie and Judge Bakone Justice Moloto.

27 May 2011: Judge Alphons Orie issues a decision granting in part the Prosecution’s motion to amend the indictment of Ratko Mladić.  The Prosecution is ordered to file the Proposed Indictment within seven days.
26 May 2011:  Ratko Mladić, General Colonel and former Commander of the Main Staff of the army of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina/Republika Srpska, is arrested in Serbia.  Mladić was initially indicted by the ICTY on 25 July 1995 and has been a fugitive from justice for almost sixteen years.

24 May 2011:  Trial Chamber II makes public an order in lieu of an indictment which initiated contempt proceedings against Vojislav Šešelj on 9 May 2011 for failing to remove confidential information from his personal website in violation of orders of the Chamber.  Šešelj is currently standing trial at the ICTY for alleged war crimes allegedly committed between 1991 and 1994.

16 May 2011:  Trial Chamber III, which is presiding over the case of Radovan Karadžić, begins a five-day site visit to several locations in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and its surrounding areas.  The judges will be accompanied by representatives of both the Prosecution and the Defense.

6 May 2011:  ICTY providers of support services to victims and witnesses hold a meeting with approximately twenty of their counterparts from Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro.  The meeting was the first regional meeting of witness support providers to take place as part of the War Crimes Justice Project and permitted participants to discuss and share experiences of witnesses testifying at the ICTY and before national courts.

15 April 2011:  Trial Chamber I issues its judgment in the case of Gotovina et al.  The Chamber convicted two Croatian Generals, Ante Gotovina and Mladen Markač, of charges of crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war committed by the Croatian forces during the Operation Storm military campaign between July and September 1995 and sentenced them to twenty-four and eighteen years, respectively.  Ivan Čermak, who was the Commander of the Knin Garrison, was acquitted of all charges.

12 April 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Accused withdraws his second motion for a binding order on the government of Bosnia Herzegovina to produce interviews of Alija Izetbegović.

11 April 2011: Prosecutor Brammertz visits Sarajevo on the first of his planned working visits to the region ahead of his June report to the Security Council.  He will meet with the Presidency, judicial authorities, and victims’ representatives.

11 April 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Trial Chamber denies the Accused’s motion to strike the joint criminal enterprise liability allegations as to specific intent crimes, specifically genocide and persecution as a crime against humanity.

11 April 2011: In the case of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović, Simatović asks the Trial Chamber to grant certification to file an appeal against a decision regarding the scheduling order, claiming the Trial Chamber’s decision directly affects the Accused’s right to a fair trial.  Additionally, the Prosecution rests its case.

7 April 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Accused moves for a finding that the Office of the Prosecutor violated the time frame in which to disclose several witness documents.

6 April 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Accused requests subpoenas to interview Christoph von Bezold, a German national who served in the European Community Monitoring Mission and General Director Sadeghi, an Iranian national who served as General Director of Export of the Iranian Ministry of Defense Logistics Section. Karadžić also submits a motion requesting the Trial Chamber’s assistance in conducting an interview of Ghanaian Griffths Evans.

6 April 2011: Radovan Karadžić moves for a finding that he has no case to answer regarding the 1994 shelling of a Sarajevo flea market based on the finding in the Dragomir Milosević case that the evidence was insufficient to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the Bosnian Serbs were responsible for the shelling.

6 April 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Accused requests the Trial Chamber invite Bosnia Herzegovina to produce transcripts of witness testimony from three cases before the Bosnia Herzegovina War Crimes Chamber and three cases before the Cantonal Court of Sarajevo. Karadžić also withdrew his second motion for a binding order to the Government of Denmark for documents as interviews with the Commander of the Danish contingent to UNPROFOR lead him to conclude Denmark has no further relevant documents.

1 April 2011: The ICTY website launches a new feature highlighting the use of war demographics by the Office of the Prosecutor. The feature provides expert reports accepted into evidence during ICTY trials and includes key findings from the Tribunal’s twelve years of collecting data.

31 March 2011: The registry announces that judgment in the case of Ante Gotovina et al. will be rendered on 15 April at 11:00. Ante Gotovina, Ivan Cermak and Mladen Markac are accused of participating in a joint criminal enterprise to permanently remove the Serb population for the Krajina region in Croatia.

30 March 2011: The registry announces that in the trial of  Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin, a pre-Defence conference will be held on Monday, 4 April prior to the start of the defence case, which is scheduled to begin on Monday 11 April. Both are charged with the crimes against humanity of persecution on political, racial, or religious grounds; extermination; murder; torture; and other inhumane acts (including forcible transfer and deportation).
30 March 2011: The Registry announces that in the trial of Vojislav Śešelj, the Trial Chamber will issue an oral decision on Rule 98bis proceedings on 4 May 2011. Under Rule 98bis, the Trial Chamber must enter a judgment of acquittal on any count if evidence cannot support a conviction.

29 March 2011: In the case of Momčilo Perišić, the prosecution completes its closing arguments, requesting a life sentence for Perišić. Perišić, former Chief of the General Staff of the Yugoslav Army, is charged with murder; inhumane acts; persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds; and extermination as crimes against humanity. He is also charged with murder and attacks on civilians as violations of the laws and customs of war.

29 March 2011: As part of the Tribunal’s efforts to “consolidate and present” the Tribunal’s achievements, the Tribunal launched a war demographics feature on the ICTY website.  The feature is a statistical consolidation of twelve sources to map the death toll, patterns of refugee flow, and other characteristics of the conflict.

29 March 2011: In the Perišić trial, Chambers grants the Prosecution’s request to change the status of certain exhibits admitted under seal to public exhibits.

28 March 2011: The Tribunal holds training with Judges and Prosecutors from Bosnia Herzegovina as part of the War Crimes Justice Project in order to share the Tribunal’s “institutional knowledge and specialized skills with jurisdictions in the region.”

25 March 2011: Radovan Karadžić moves to recall prosecution witness Dražen Erdemović for cross-examination based on new evidence that did not exist at the time of Erdemović’s testimony.  The Accused asserts the new information is a book about Srebrenica and Erdemović’s testimony in the Perisic trial.

24 March 2011: In the case of Vojislav Šešelj, the Trial Chamber announces it will render its oral decision on the Accused’s Rule 98bis motion.  Rule 98bis allows the Accused to file a motion for a judgment of acquittal on one or more offenses after the close of the Prosecutor’s case.

24 March 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Trial Chamber orders Venezuelan representatives to appear before the court on 10 May 2011 regarding the Accused’s repeated requests for confidential documents and Venezuela’s failure to provide the Tribunal with requested progress reports.

24 March 2011: The Trial Chamber denies Radovan Karadžić’s motion to compel eight witnesses, whose prior testimony and written statement have been admitted into evidence pursuant to Rule 92 bis, to submit to interviews by the Accused.

22 March 2011: Dragomir Milošević is transferred to Estonia to serve his 29-year sentence for crimes committed against civilians of Sarajevo during the second half of the 1992-1995 siege.  Milošević is a former Commander of the Sarajevo-Romanija Corps of the Bosnian Serb Army, which encircled and Sarajevo during the conflict. Milošević was convicted of crimes against humanity and a violation of the law or customs of war on 12 December 2007. He was originally sentenced to 33 years’ imprisonment and his sentence was later reduced to 29 years on appeal in November 2009.

22 March 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić , the Trial Chamber orders that a hearing be held on 10 May 2011 in relation to Karadžić’s motion for a binding order to Venezuela to provide Karadžić with documents.

21 March 2011: The Appeals Chamber orders Baton Haxhiu to reimburse the ICTY 12,122.80 euros for costs sustained in providing Haxhiu with legal counsel in his contempt case before the Tribunal. Haxhiu was convicted on 24 July 2008 of contempt before the ICTY and fined 7,000 euros for revealing the identify of a protected witness in the case of Haradinaj et al.

18 March 2011: The decision granting early release to Blagoje Simić effective 16 March 2011 is made public. Judge Robinson issued the decision on 15 February 2011.

17 March 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Trial Chamber grants in part Karadžić’s motion for suspension of proceedings and orders that proceedings be further suspended for two weeks. Following this decision, proceedings will resume on 23 May 2011.

15 March 2011: Iran responds to Karadzic’s second motion for a binding order regarding requested documents. Iran stated that Karadzic hadn’t shown any link between the document and Karadzic’s crimes, but in the interest of cooperation with the tribunal, Iran instructed its Defense Department to search of the documents. The search yielded nothing.

14 March 2011: The prosecution responds to issues raised in Simatovic’s 25 February 2011 motion for a 5-month period to prepare a Defense. It stated that the Defense overstated their lack of preparation, that the complexity of the issues to be resolved would not materially interfere with their preparation of the Defense case, and that the timing of the Rule 98bis hearing and decision should not interfere with the Defense’s preparation.

10 March 2011: Karadzic moves for an order to suspend the trail for an additional 6 weeks due to disclosure violations by the prosecutor.

8 March 2011: In the case of Vujadin Popović, et al., Drago Nikolić submits a notice of appeal. Nikolić was found guilty of aiding and abetting genocide; and planning, ordering and committing the crimes against humanity of extermination, murder, and persecution. 

7 March 2011: In the case of Vojislav Šešelj, the Registrar files an annex to an independent handwriting expert report regarding the notebooks of Ratko Mladić.

7 March 2011: The Appeals Chamber dismisses Idriz Balaj and Lahi Brahimaj's requests for standing to participate and be heard with respect to issues arising in the appeal of Ramush Haradinaj.

4 March 2011: In the trial of Radovan Karadžić, the Chamber hears testimony from Mehmed Musić, who was a resident of the village of Musići in the Hadžići municipality of Sarajevo. He is testifying as to his experience and that of other non-Serbs held in detention facilities across Hadžići, and of the beatings and disappearances of 47 detainees from Hadžići.

3 March 2011: The Registrar grants Stojan Župljanin’s application for full legal aid, and his counsel and expenses relating to his defense shall be borne by the Tribunal.

2 March 2011: The Defense presents their rejoinders in the Prlić, et al. case, and the accused, Prlić, Stojić, and Petković deliver personal statements.  Judgment to be rendered in due course.

2 March 2011: In the case of Popović, et al., the Appeals Chamber dismisses Ljubomir Borovčanin’s appeal of the Trial Chamber’s decision denying him provisional release. Borovčanin requested a ten-day provisional release to visit his father, who was ill. After determining that Borovčanin’s father’s health is stable, the Appeals Chamber found “no acute justification” for provisionally releasing Borovčanin.

25 February 2011: In the case of Stanišić & Župljanin, Trial Chamber II issues a decision denying Mićo Stanišić’s request for provisional release during a break following the close of the Prosecution’s case. Stanišić requested the break to cooperate with his defence team in Belgrade. The Trial Chamber denied Stanišić’s request due to a lack of “compelling humanitarian grounds” that would justify provisional release at this advanced stage of trial proceedings.

24 February 2011: The trial of Prlić et al. nears completion as parties present their closing arguments.

22 February 2011: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the prosecution examines witness Berko Zečević, an associate professor and head of the defense technology at the University of Sarajevo, and weapons expert on mortars and artillery. 

22 February 2011: In the case of Zdravko Tolimir, the prosecution examines new witness Dean Manning, a former Office of the Prosecutor investigator of the events in Srebrenica.

22 February 2011: The contempt of court trial of Vojislav Šešelj begins today.

21 February 2011: The registrar denies Radovan Karadžić’s request for a reversal of the decision to monitor his phone calls.  The decision stated the Accused has “embarked on a fishing expedition, requesting to discontinue the systematic monitoring of non-privileged telephone calls and thereby deprive the Registrar of the very tool he requires to protect the good order of the UNDU, the rights of victims and witnesses, and not least, the safety and security of the detainees themselves.”

18 February 2011: In the case of Gotovina, et al, the Chamber grants a partial appeal and orders Croatia to stop criminal proceedings against the Gotovina defense team for acts performed in their official function for the Tribunal, and to return all materials seized from the defense team.

18 February 2011: The Trial Chamber withdraws the Order in Lieu of Indictment in the Berko Zečević contempt case.  Following his arrest and transfer to The Hague, Zečević agreed to testify, leading Chambers to suspend the Order and Detention on Remand until Zečević completes his testimony.

18 February 2011: The Trial Chamber denies Radovan Karadžić’s request for the U.S. to provide him with reports concerning the delivery of arms, ammunition, or military equipment by air to Tuzla in February-March 1995. The Chamber also denies the Accused’s motion to appeal the Chamber’s decision regarding the authenticity of intercepted messages. The Chamber grants the Accused’s motion for Saudi Arabia to provide certain documents and invites Saudi Arabia to provide a response by 31 May 2011. The Chamber admits witness General Adrianus van Baal’s notes taken while he was in Sarajevo into evidence, but denies the Accused’s request to recall the witness. 

18 February 2011: The ICTY announces that the judgment in the case of Pedrag Đorđević will be rendered on 23 February 2011.

17 February 2011: Berko Zečević is transferred to the UN Detention Unit (UNDU) to stand trial for contempt.

17 February 2011: New witness Teufika Ibrahimefendić, a psychotherapist from the Center for Therapy and Rehabilitation in Tuzla, testifies in the case of Zdravko Tolimir.  Witness Helge Brunborg, a demographer and former Office of the Prosecutor staff member, also continues testimony from 10 February 2011.

17 February 2011: Ramiz Mujkić begins testimony in the Karadžić case about events in the village of Ahatovići.  In June of 1992, over 50 Bosiniak men and boys were taken prisoner, tortured and put on a bus that was later fired upon, killing most of the prisoners. 

17 February 2011: Radovan Karadžić moves for an order that the provision of Rule 70 regarding matters not subject to disclosure shall apply to seven documents to be provided by the UN in response the Accused’s request.

17 February 2011: Prosecution witness KDZ-041, an eyewitness from the municipality of Novi Grad testifies in the case of Radovan Karadžić.

16 February 2011: The Trial Chamber orders suspension of the proceedings in the case of Radovan Karadžić from 21 March until 5 May 2011 to allow the Accused to review the large volume of material recently disclosed to him by the Prosecution.

16 February 2011: New witness Mirsada Malagić, a woman whose husband and two sons were killed in Srebrenica, testifies in the Zdravko Tolimir case. Prosecution witness PW-013, an eyewitness from Srebrenica also resumes testimony.

16 February 2011: The Trial Chamber indicts Berko Zečević for contempt. Zečević was arrested after being subpoenaed as a witness in the Karadžić case.

16 February 2011: Witness Tihomir Glavaš, a former Chief of Police in Hadžići, resumes testimony in the Karadžić case.

14 February 2011: The Trial Chamber, pursuant to Article 29 of the Statute of the Tribunal and Rules 54 and 54 bis of the Rules, denies Karadzic’s motion for a binding order against UN and NATO.

11 February 2011: Karadzic requests Chamber to issue a second invitation of subpoena for interviews and a binding order to the Government of Bosnia and Herzegovina for production of documents relating to his earlier motion for subpoena and interviews.

10 February 2011: Karadzic renews his request for suspension of the trial for three months, moving (39th motion, not the last) for a finding of disclosure violations by the prosecution stating that Rule 68 has been violated by the failure to disclose.

10 February 2011: In the Karadzic case, the Prosecution requests that the Chamber deny the accused’s application to appeal Chamber decision on intercepts. The Chamber only took notice of the intercepts when they were sufficiently authenticated, and the accused hasn’t shown that the criteria were insufficient to safeguard the fairness of the trial.

9 February 2011: Karadzic submits 38th motion for disclosure violation and requests a three-month suspension of trial.

1 February 2011: The President of the Tribunal denies Ivica Rajić’s request for early release from a Spanish prison, where he has been serving his sentence since 13 April 2007. The President based his decision on the very high gravity of Rajić’s crimes, and his view that the time he has served in detention does not work in favor of his release. The President indicated that Rajić has not yet served two-thirds of his sentence, which he will have done on approximately 5 April 2011.

1 February 2011: The Judgement in the case of Vlastimir Đorđević will be rendered on 23 February 2011. Đorđević, a former senior Serbian police official, is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes committed against Kosovo Albanian civilians in 1999. The trial began on 27 January 2009 and concluded with closing arguments which were held on 13 and 14 July 2010.

1 February 2011: The pre-trial conference in the contempt of court case of Vojislav Šešelj will be held on 22 February and will be immediately followed by the trial. Šešelj is accused of having disclosed information on 11 protected witnesses, including their names, occupations and places of residence, in a book he authored. This is the second time Šešelj faces charges of contempt for disclosing information on protected witnesses.

2 February 2011:  In the case of Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin, the Prosecution rests its case. The Defence was expected to inform the Chamber whether it intends to file Rule 98bis submissions by the end of 2 February 2011. Should the Defence decide to do so, a Rule 98bis hearing will be scheduled to hear submissions of both parties upon which the Trial Chamber may enter a judgement of acquittal on any count should it find that there is no evidence capable of supporting a conviction.

26 January 2011: In the trial of Radovan Karadžić, the prosecution begins the “hostage component” of its case. The prosecution alleges that Karadžić participated in the capture of over 200 UN military observes and peacekeepers between May and June of 1995 in response to NATO strikes on Bosnian Serb military targets.

25 January 2011: In the trial of Vojislav Šešelj, the Trial Chamber orders a Rule 98bis hearing be held from 7 March 2011 onward. Under Rule 98bis, the Trial Chamber shall issue an acquittal on any counts it finds lack sufficient evidence to support convictions. In the hearing, Šešelj will have an opportunity to present his arguments on Wikileaks documents he purports demonstrate U.S. government interference in the tribunal’s work. 

19 January 2011: The ICTY website launches an upgraded version of two multimedia features: Voice of the Victims and Statements of Guilt. Voice of the Victims allows users to view video clips of testimony and read about the personal experiences of witnesses who have given evidence before the tribunal. The Statement of Guilt section provides similar access to statements made by the accused who pled guilty before the tribunal.

12 January 2011: In the case of Vojislav Šešelj, the registrar submits an expert handwriting analysis report concluding that notebooks recovered from former Republika Srpska General Ratko Mladić’s wife’s home were, in fact, authored by the Mladić. The handwriting analyst, Dr. Dorijan Keržan, reached his conclusion by comparing the notebooks with other materials confirmed to have been written by Mladić’ from the same time period. The Trial Chamber will consider the report before issuing its decision on the prosecution’s motion to admit sections of the notebooks as evidence.
22 December 2010: The UNSC adopts a resolution to establish a residual mechanism for remaining tasks from the ICTY and ICTR after the completion of their mandates. The International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT) is scheduled to begin functioning on 1 July 2013 for the ICTY and 1 July 2012 for the ICTR. The IRMCT will have two branches, one for each tribunal.

8 December 2010: The Appeals Chamber vacates the May 2009 Appeals Chamber Judgment of Veselin Šljivančanin in a split decision. The groundbreaking decision overturns Šljivančanin’s conviction for conspiracy to commit murder in light of new testimony undermining the mens rea element of that charge. The Review Judgment is the first successful application of the review procedure after sixteen years of the procedure lying functionally dormant.

6 December 2010: ICTY President Patrick Robinson and ICTY Prosecutor Serge Brammertz address the UNSC. Judge Robinson’s address focuses on the pressure on tribunal resources and staff, noting that the trial schedule shifts in response to incidents of witness intimidation, deaths of defense counsel, the discovery of new evidence, staff attrition and complications with the self-represented accused. Brammertz reports on the progress of the tribunal’s trial and appeals proceedings, issues of state cooperation, judicial capacity-building in the former Yugoslavia and plans for the end of the tribunal’s mandate.

18 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the UN states that it is already complying with Karadzic’s request to supply documents deemed material to his defense.  The UN states that the documents requested are akin to a “needle in a haystack” and that the documents may not available to Karadzic in time to be prepared before Ambassador Arria’s cross examination.  The UN also asserts that it is under no legal obligation to release its documents for us in proceedings before the Tribunal.

18 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Chamber invites France to respond to Karadzic’s motion to subpoena Colonel Guy de Haynin de Bry within three weeks.

18 November 2010:  In the case of Seselj, the Chamber defers deadline for Seselj’s heath report to 15 January and orders the medical report of 28 October be given to an expert panel.

18 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Chamber dismisses Karadzic’s motion to delay testimony of Charles Kirudja until the commencement of the municipalities component of its case.  The Chamber is also concerned that Karadzic considers himself insufficiently prepared for the upcoming phase of the Prosecution’s case, and his management of resources.

17 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Prosecution tenders part of the evidence of Alimir Begic. 

17 November 2010:  In the case of Seselj, all parties are ordered to submit issues they wish to raise in court at least two days prior to hearing day.

15 November 2010:  In the case of Prlic et al, Stojic Defense opposes the Prosecution’s motion for reconsideration of scheduling order and asks for a certification to appeal should its motion be denied.  The Defense further asserts that the Prosecution should not be granted further additional pages for its final trial brief, and instead that the Defense should be granted additional pages.

15 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Prosecution tenders part of the evidence of Lieutenant-Colonel Harry Konings.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Radovan Karadzic, the Chamber grants part of the Defense’s motions on disclosure violations by the Prosecution and orders the Prosecution to search for and disclose potentially exculpatory materials, to be completed by 17 December.  The Chamber also expresses that it is deeply disturbed by the Prosecution’s continuing violations of disclosure obligations.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Prlic et al, Stojic requests leave to reply to Prosecution and Defense Motions to reopen cases as per the October 6 decision.  Stojic submits that compelling circumstances necessitate the filing of a reply since the Prosecution’s Response raises issues of interpretation of the documents Stojic seeks to admit, and the Response raises new issues not addressed in the Defense’s original motion.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Prlic et al, Praljak asserts that the Prosecution should not be granted additional pages for its final trial brief.  Instead, additional pages should go to the Defense because it has a harder case to make. 

12 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, Karadzic requests either the recalling of General van Baal for further cross examination or for the admission of the general’s notes from his time in Sarajevo.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Prosecution opposes the Defense’s motion to recall General van Baal for further cross examination or for the admission of the general’s notes.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the Defense requests to subpoena Colonel Guy de Haynin de Bry.

12 November 2010:  ICTY delivers the first transcripts in local languages to Bosnia and Herzegovina as part of a project to enhance the capacity of judiciaries in the region to handle complex war crimes cases.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Seselj, the judge grants a handwriting expert an extra 60 days to assess Mladic’s notebooks.

12 November 2010:  In the case of Karadzic, the EU requests a 15 day extension to respond to Karadzic’s motion for the EU to provide certain documents.

11 November 2010: The Tribunal launches the War Crimes Justice Project Newsletter, which will provide progress updates about the Project. The War Crimes Justice Project aims to assist the transfer of knowledge and materials from the ICTY to the former Yugoslavia.

10 November 2010: In the case of Zdravko Tolomir, OTP investigator Tomasz Blaszczyk testifies about the investigation of a video recording made by Zoran Petrovic Pirocanac, a journalist from Belgrade in the Srebrenica area on 13 and 14 July 1995.  Investigators visited the sites recorded on the video, took photos and determined their coordinates and bound them with freeze frames from the video.

09 November 2010: In the case of Zdravko Tolomir, Vincentius Egbers resumes his testimony for the Prosecution.  Egbers was a UN Peacekeeper on the ground in Srebrenica.  He has testified that he witnessed the VRS separate men from women and children after the fall of Srebrenica. 

09 November 2010: Tribunal President Robinson denies a request for early release of Zoran Žigić who has been serving his 25-year sentence in Austria since 2006.  In his decision, the President cited the gravity of the crimes committed by Žigić and the Tribunal policy of not allowing release before at least two-thirds of the sentence has been served, which in the case of Žigić is not until 2014.

09 November 2010: Trial Chambers denies Radovan Karadžić’s motion to admit the report “The Truth About Gorazde,” an 11-page report allegedly authored by the Task Force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare of the U.S. House of Representatives Republican Research Committee. Chambers finds the report to be an unreliable source and expresses concern over the partisan nature and policy implication of the report.

09 November 2010: The Prosecution in the Jadranko Prlić case replies to the Defense’s motions to reopen cases, requesting the Trial Chamber reject “at least those exhibits to which the Prosecution has objected.” 

08 November 2010: Witness ST-222 begins testimony in the Stojan Župljanin and Mićo Stanišić case about events in Zvornik.  During the conflict, Zvornik’s Bosnian Muslim population was entirely expelled though mass murder and shipment to concentration camps and prisons.

08 November 2010: In the case of Zdravko Tolomir, Christopher Lawrence, a forensic pathologist begins testimony for the Prosecution regarding post mortem exams conducted on the remains of victims exhumed from mass graves in Srebrenica.

08 November 2010: In the case of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović, the Prosecution submits a Notice of Compliance with the Trial Chambers’ order to provide Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian translations of Presiding Officer verifications and English translations of declarations of 14 witnesses; and to report to Chambers whether the Prosecution will apply protective measures to 15 witnesses. 

08 November 2010: The Defense for Franko Simatović requests certification to appeal the Chambers’ decision to admit the testimony of Stevan Todorović.

08 November 2010: Defense in the Veselin Šljivančanin case responds to Prosecution’s response alleging Panić lied in his testimony and his evidence was implausible.  The Defense also maintains its position that Panić’s testimony constitutes a new fact that has been proved.

08 November 2010: Accused Mićo Stanišić requests temporary provisional release during the Tribunal’s winter recess.  In supporting the motion, the Accused points to his voluntary surrender to the Tribunal, his respectful behavior towards the Trial Chamber, his compliance during previous releases, and the fact that he is not a flight risk.

05 November 2010: In the Stojan Župljanin and Mićo Stanišić case, protected witness ST-241 testifies about events in Kotor Varoš.  Kotor Varoš is a site in Northwestern Bosnia where homes and religious and cultural monuments were destroyed by armed groups.  The entire Croat and Muslim cultural and historic heritage was destroyed. 

05 November 2010: In the case of Radavan Karadžić, the Defense claims the Prosecution violated disclosure rules by not disclosing a statement made by KDZ155 in 1995 by the disclosure deadline, even though the statement was in the Prosecutions possession.  The Accused’s further moves to exclude the testimony of KDZ155 on that basis.

05 November 2010:  The Tribunal delivers the first set of trial transcripts translated into Serbian to the Serbian War Crimes Prosecutor.  This effort is part of a project to enhance capacity of local judiciaries to handle war crimes cases.

04 November 2010: In the case of General Momčilo Perišić, Ivan Djokic, testifying as an expert witness for the Defense, says that the Bosnian Serbs got their weapons from “FRY, Israel, Russia and Ukraine” and from “brokers who bought the weapons on the black market.”

04 November 2010: In the Jadranko Prlić case, the Chamber grants the Prosecution's motion to reopen its case against the Accused to tender the Mladić notebooks, as they constitute “fresh evidence.”

03 November 2010: In the Radovan Karadžić case, the Chamber invites the UN and Venezuela to respond to Karadžić’s motion for an order for the release of documents related to and authored by Ambassador Arria in Bosnia.  The Chambers also orders a one-month adjournment of Radovan Karadzic’s trial to allow the accused to inspect the evidence the prosecution disclosed to him in October 2010.

03 November 2010: In the Vojislav Šešelj case, the handwriting in the Mladić notebooks is to be examined by expert, with a report expected by 15 December 2010.

02 November 2010: In the case of Jadranko Prlić, the Chamber announces that the OTP Closing arguments will begin on 17 January 2011.

02 November 2010: Karadžić contests witness Dr. Youssef Hajir’s testimony stating that here were 16,000 injured and 1,000 killed inhabitants of Dobrinja during the siege of Sarajevo.

01 November 2010: The Chamber orders the parties in the Prlić case to submit their final briefs by 13 December 2010.

28 October 2010: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Chamber invites the EU to respond to Karadzic’s motion for a binding order requiring the EU to provide certain documents on communications, reports and arms provisions.  Additionally, in his cross-examination of the former UNPROFOR chief of staff, Dutch general Adrianus Van Baal, the Accused attempted to prove that the Serb side wanted peace on the Sarajevo theatre in 1994.

28 October 2010: The Chamber denies Bruno Stojić request to appeal the Decision reopening the Prosecution case and invites the Defense to refute new evidence. 

28 October 2010: In the case of Veselin Šljivančanin, the Prosecution argues that Panić’s evidence is not credible and cannot meet the review applicant’s burden to prove the new fact and its decisive impact on the verdict.

28 October 2010: The Šljivančanin prosecution argues that his 5-year sentence does not reflect the gravity of crimes of the Accused and recommends 15 years.

29 October 2010: The Chamber releases the revised fourth amended indictment for former Kosovo prime minister Ramush Haradinaj, a former guerrilla leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army.

29 October 2010: In the case of Jovica Stanišić, the defense cross-examined Reynaud Theunens, prosecution military expert, challenging Theunens’ conclusion that the Serbian MUP tolerated and supported the activities of Šešelj’s men in the early 1990s.

28 October 2010: Sljivancanin  prosecution asserts that a five-year sentence does not reflect gravity of crimes of the accused, and recommends a sentence of fifteen years. Sljivancanin was convicted for his role in the Vukovar massacre as a JNA leader. The Prosecutor argues that Panić's new evidence is not credible and that the accused's application for review should be dismissed.

28 October 2010: In the Stojic case, the Chambers denies  the accused's request to appeal the decision reopening the Prosecution case.

28 October 2010: In the Karadzic case, the Trial Chamber invites the European Union to respond to a motion for a binding order regarding documents on communications reports and arms provisions.

26 October 2010: Concluding the Status Conference in the re-trial of Haradinaj et al., the Chamber requests a shortened operative indictment be filed by 28 October. The Prosecution’s list of witnesses and exhibits is due by 30 November 2010.

22 October 2010: In Vojislav Šešelj’s case, the Trial Chamber stays its decision on the Prosecution’s motion to admit as evidence thirteen extracts from Mladic’s notebooks because the Trial Chamber could not determine the probative value or reliability of the extracts. The Trial Chamber cites uncertainties about the time when the notebooks were written and Manojlo Milovanović’s statement that he could not recognize the handwriting on some of the extracts. The Trial Chamber ordered the nomination of an independent witness to determine whether Mladic authored the extracts and when the extracts were written.

21 October 2010: The Trial Chamber orders a fresh expert medical evaluation of Vojislav Šešelj due to his visibly deteriorating health.  The Chambers requests the new doctors evaluate, among other things, the current state of the accused’s health, the conditions from which the accused suffers, and the course of treatment the accused ought to follow.

21 October 2010: In the Prlić case, Milivoj Petković’s defense requests certification to appeal the Trial Chamber’s 6 October 2010 decision re-opening the Prosecution’s case to tender the Mladić notebooks as evidence, denying Defense’s request to call Manojlo Milanović to appear for cross-examination regarding Mladić’s handwriting, and limiting any prospective Defense requests for re-opening based on the notebooks solely to refuting the evidence admitted.

21 October 2010: Defense for Veselin Šljivančanin moves the Appeals Chambers to find the new fact raised by the testimony of Miodrag Panić that Mrkšić did not inform the accused of an order to remove JNA security from Ovčara be proved true and, as a result, review the seventeen-year sentence imposed on the accused.  The Defense claims that the new fact “alters the balance of evidence” and that Appeals Chamber must impose a new sentence not to exceed six years, which amounts to the time already served.

21 October 2010: In the Šainović case, Nebojša Pavković requests temporary provisional release to receive dental treatment.  Convicted persons may be granted temporary leave if it is believed (1) that the convicted person will surrender into detention at the end of the fixed period; (2) the convicted person will not pose a danger to any victim, witness, or other person; and (3) special circumstances exist to warrant the release.  The Defense claims all of these criteria are met.

21 October 2010: In the case of Zdravko Tolomir, Office of the Prosecutor investigator Erin Gallagher continues her testimony regarding video material from Srebrenica.

20 October 2010: President Robinson grants, in part, the Nikolić, Popović, Beara, and Miletić motions for extension of time to file briefs and orders the appellants file their briefs no later than 21 January 2011, respondents file their briefs no later than 4 April 2011, and the reply briefs be filed no later than 2 May 2011.

20 October 2010: The Trial Chamber in the Radovan Karadžić case invites Bosnia Herzegovina to submit a report regarding its efforts to respond to document requests made by the accused by 15 November 2010.   Additionally, the accused argues that late disclosure of documents by Canada regarding Markale violates the rules of the Tribunal and moves for a three-month suspension of trial so he may review them.  Accused also moves for a binding order on the European Union to produce documents regarding correspondence with the Accused and reports on arms provisions.

20 October 2010: Bogdan Vidovic, the former criminal forensic technician with the Sarajevo police, resumes testimony in the Radovan Karadžić case.

20 October 2010: The Tribunal donates fifteen computers to a Bosnian elementary school near Srebrenica to allow the 120 students to learn how to use computers and allow the school to improve its accounting and bookkeeping.

18 October 2010: Judge O-Gon Kwon, acting as Tribunal President, appoints the panel for the appeal of Ljubomir Borovčanin.  The panel will consist of Judge Patrick Robinson, Judge Mehmet Güney, Judge Fausto Pocar, Judge Liu Daqun, and Judge Andresia Vaz.

18 October 2010: The ICTY Outreach Program launches the 2010-2011 schedule, which includes a series of presentations at fifteen Kosovo high schools as part of the Civic Education syllabus.  The presentations are designed to introduce students to the Tribunal’s work and purpose.

18 October 2010: Tribunal President Robinson declines the request of Haradin Bala, a former KLA prison camp guard, for a reduction of his thirteen-year sentence for crimes he committed against Serb and Kosovo Albanian civilians.  President Robinson cited the gravity of Bala’s crimes and the fact that Bala has shown very limited rehabilitation in his decision.  Bala is serving his time in France and argued that under French law, he was eligible to benefit from sentence reduction.

18 October 2010: In the case of Stojan Župljanin and Mićo Stanišić, Ivo Atilja, the case’s 100th witness, testifies about events in Prijedor. Prijidor was the site of the second largest massacre of 1992 (after Srebrenica) and was carried out by Serb military leadership against Bosniak civilians in the Prijedor region. 

15 October 2010: Radovan Karadžić asks the Chambers to order Canada to disclose a document regarding Markale, a pair of massacres in 1994 and 1995 allegedly carried out by Republika Srpska in Sarajevo.

15 October 2010: In the case of Stojan Župljanin and Mićo Stanišić, Ramiz Subasic testifies about the Ključ region of Bosnia Herzegovina.  Serb nationalists allegedly ethnically cleansed the whole region between 1992 and1995.

15 October 2010: 54 bis hearing scheduled in the trial of Radovan Karadžić to hear from representatives of the government of Bosnia and Herzegovina on their efforts to provide the Accused with a number of documents on the alleged clandestine supply of arms.

12 October 2010: Chambers allows additional witness for the prosecution in Stanisic and Zupljanin case and expands the scope of the testimony of two other witnesses.

12 October 2010: Appeals Chamber holds a hearing reviewing its sentence of former JNA major Veselin Šljivančanin to seventeen years’ imprisonment based on the defense’s claim that new evidence has come to light contradicting his conviction for aiding and abetting the murder of P.O.W.s at a small farm near Vukovar during the incident known as the “Vukovar massacre.”

11 October 2010: President Robinson partially reverses decision restricting correspondence between Radovan Karadžić and an Austrian journalist, Robert Treichler. The partial reversal allows communication between journalist and Karadžić.

8 October 2010:  President Robinson addresses the U.N. General assembly; highlighting the challenges the ICTY faces in the implementation of its completion strategy. Robinson indicates that all appeals are scheduled to be completed by 2014 but the completion of an appeal for Radovan Karadžić’s trial will have to be assessed at a later time.

7 October 2010: Trial chamber partially grants request in Jadranko Prlić case to enter eight of fifteen requested extracts from Ratko Mladić’s notebooks and documents into evidence. The chamber found that notebooks contain notes Mladić’s meetings with the Accused. The defense has until 20 October to appeal the decision.

7 October 2010:  In the case of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović, the Trial Chamber grants the Prosecution’s motion to add 18 military notebooks that were used Ratko Mladić which contain contemporaneous notes taken by Mladić from the period of June 1991 to November 1996.  The Defense had argued granting the motion would violate the Accused’s right to a fair trial.

7 October 2010: President Robinson dismisses Vojislav Šešelj’s motion to disqualify Judge Alphons Orie on the grounds that the Accused failed to put forth credible information to substantiate his claims that Judge Orie is biased or impartial.

6 October 2010: In the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Trial Chamber orders the government of Bosnia Herzegovina by 4:00 p.m. on 11 October 2010 to provide the Chamber with the name and the capacity of the designated official who will represent BiH at the hearing, the name and designation of the person who will address the Chamber, and the name and designation of any other BiH representative who wish to attend the hearing; and to file its Rule 54 bis (F) notice of objection, if any. 

6 October 2010: Ljubomir Borovčanin’s case is closed and his 17-year imprisonment sentence is final.  Borovčanin did not file an appeal and he is awaiting transfer to serve his sentence for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica in July 1995.

6 October 2010: The Trial Chamber orders the proceedings of the Jadranko Prlić case resume based on the President’s decision not to disqualify Judge Prandler.

5 October 2010: The Trial Chamber grants in part and denies in part the Prosecution’s motion to admit portions of the Bosnian Serb Assembly Records in the Radovan Karadžić trial.  The Trial Chamber also denies Karadžić’s sixteenth motion alleging a violation of the Tribunal rules and procedures.

4 October 2010: The President denies Jadranko Prlić’s motion and Slobodan Praljak’s Joinder to disqualify Judge Prandler from the proceedings, finding Prlić failed to show any actual bias or appearance of bias by Judge Prandler.

4 October 2010: The Prosecution in the case of Radovan Karadžić submits a list of 29 witnesses to be called during the months of November and December 2010.

4 October 2010: In the case of Zdravko Tolimir, the Trial Chamber grants the Prosecution’s request to amend the witness list to include Professor Berko Zecevic as an expert witness to testify as to modified airbombs used by the Bosnian Serb Army in Bosnia.

1 October 2010: ICTY launches its official Twitter and YouTube accounts allowing the public to follow the latest activity in ongoing trials and view video clips of pleas, testimonies, and documentaries about the ICTY. 

30 September 2010:  The Trial Chamber denies Radovan Karadžić’s motion to exclude from evidence 164 intercepted telephone conversations on the grounds that even if they were obtained in violation of applicable domestic law, Karadžić failed to show that admitting the conversations into evidence would damage the integrity of the proceedings.  The Trial Chamber also partially granted Karadžić’s motion to admit documents, admitting 26 items into evidence and denying admission of 6 items.  Additionally, the Trial Chamber dismisses as moot Karadžić’s seventeenth motion arguing there has been a violation of Tribunal rules and procedures.

30 September 2010: The Trial Chamber grants Zdravko Tolimir’s request to access to confidential material from the Momčilo Perišić case as related to the crimes alleged to have occurred in Srebienica, general allegations, and Tolimir personally, including confidential transcripts from closed sessions, exhibits, submissions of the parties, and decisions of the Chambers.  Tolimir served as Assistant Commander for Intelligence and Security of the Bosnian Serb Army and reported directly to Ratko Mladić and is charged with five counts of murder, persecutions and inhumane acts, and deportation.

28 September 2010:  President of the Tribunal, Judge Patrick Robinson and Ambassador Janez Lenarčič, the Director of ODIHR, launch “War Crimes Justice Project,” an 18-month program designed to provide legal support to professionals working on war crimes cases in the former Yugoslavia.

23 September 2010: Status Conference held in the case of Ramush Haradinaj, former prime minister of Kosovo and former guerilla leader of the Kosovo Liberation Army. Haradinaj was acquitted of all charges in 2008 but was rearrested in 2010 for a repeat trial.

22 September 2010: ICTY announces the launch of the “War Crimes Justice Project” aimed at providing practical support to legal professionals handling war crimes cases in former Yugoslavia.  The project will “facilitate the transfer of the Tribunal’s unique institutional knowledge and specialized skills to jurisdictions in the region.”

22 September 2010:  Milan Lukic’s former case manager, Jalena Rasic, pleads not guilty to five counts of an indictment charging her with contempt of court for allegedly “knowingly and willingly interfering with the administration of justice.”  Rasic is accused of bribing witnesses into making false statements. 

21 September 2010: Judge Antonetti says he “received a disturbing letter from a person close to [Vojislav] Seselj” about Seselj’s cardio-vascular problems.  In response, the Judge orders Seselj be examined by specialists.  Judge Antonetti says, “the situation is serious but not desperate” in regard to the delay in the trial and the potentially upcoming Rule98bis hearing. 

20 September 2010: Trial Chamber III grants Jadranko Prlić’s motion to stay the proceedings and adjourns the trial until a decision is made regarding Prlić’s motion to disqualify Judge Prander.

20 September 2010: Sinisa Borovic, former chef de cabinet of Momčilo Perišić, testifies in a closed session that visits between Perišić and Ratko Mladic, an accused still at large, were rare and that Borovic’s first meeting with Mladic was “a negative experience.” After being shown a letter from Perišić to the Russian defense minister indicating Perišić was trying to convince Mladic to influence Bosnian Serb leadership to accept the Contact Group plan, Borovic’s recounts that Mladic “never listened to Perišić and behaved as if he were his senior.”

17 September 2010: Witness ST-217 testifies for the prosecution in the trial of Stojan Župljanin and Mićo Stanišić in a closed session.

16 September 2010: President Robinson decides Jadranko Prilić’s motion to disqualify Judge Prandler, indicating the motion should have been addressed to Judge O-Gon Kwon.  Judge Kwon will report to President Robinson after conferring with Judge Prandler on the merits of the motion.

16 September 2010: UN Senior Military Observer and Canadian Officer Francis Roy Thomas testifies at the Karadzic trial, indicating in 1993 and 1994, the BH Army did not use tanks or other heavy artillery on Bosnian Serbs.  Thomas further testifies the BH Army personnel were sharing weapons; switching weapons as they switched shifts.  Thomas’ testimony contradicts Karadzic’s contention that the Sarajevo-Romanija Corps had been “half surrounded by the Croat-Muslim forces,” including the BH Army, deployed outside Sarajevo. 

16 September 2010: The trial of Radovan Karadzic is adjourned until 27 September 2010.  Adjournment is issued to give Karadzic time to examine over 5,000 pages of documents seized from two former VRS officers’ apartments.

16 September 2010: Drago Čovilo, a Yugoslav Army officer of communications, testifies on behalf of the defense in the trial of Momčilo Perišić. 

13 September 2010: The Trial Chamber grants Radovan Karadžić’s request for temporary suspension of proceedings to allow him time to review material the Prosecution recently disclosed to him. The trial is expected to reconvene on 27 September at 9:00 inCourtroom I.

10 September 2010: The Trial Chamber denies Ramush Haradinaj’s and Lahi Brahimaj’s requests for provisional release, citing concern for safety of witnesses. The Chamber finds that a decision to provisionally release Haradinaj would be likely to encourage the Accused’s supporters to intimidate witnesses. Regarding Lahi Brahimaj, the Chamber feels that his release would - more directly than Haradinaj - pose a danger to witnesses, victims and other persons.

8 September 2010: Regarding the case of Radovan Karadžić, the Trial Chamber issues an order to Bosnia and Herzegovina to attend a hearing on the country’s efforts to supply documents to the Accused. The documents sought are related an alleged clandestine supply of arms. The Chamber finds that the Government’s cooperation on this matter to date has been “problematic and fraught with delay.”

3 September 2010: The Court holds a Status Conference to discuss the progress of the Radovan Karadžić trial to date. The trial will continue on 6 September.

3 September 2010: The Court holds a Status Conference for the contempt of court case of Vojislav Šešelj. Šešelj’s war crimes trial is ongoing. He was charged with contempt of court on 4 February 2010 for disclosing information on 11 protected witnesses in violation of the Trial Chamber’s orders.

1 September 2010: The Closing Arguments in the trial of Gotovina et al. concludes. The Chamber will render the Judgment at date to be announced.

30 August 2010 – 2 September 2010: Closing arguments in the case of Ante Gotovina, Ivan Čermak and Mladen Markač take place. The three Croatian Generals are charged with crimes committed during the 1995 Operation Storm military offensive in Croatia. The Prosecution recommended that the Chamber sentence Gotovina to 27 years’, Markač to 23 years’ and Čermak to 17 years’ imprisonment. The Defense has asked for all three to be acquitted.

20 August 2010: The Trial Chamber suspends the hearing of evidence in the trial of Radovan Karadžić for two weeks. The trial will resume on Monday 6 September. A Status Conference will be held on Friday 3 September 2010 to discuss the progress of the trial to date.

17 August 2010: The trial of Radovan Karadžić resumes with the testimony of Richard Mole. The Chamber has decided to proceed with hearing the evidence of Richard Mole, Richard Higgs, and Tomasz Blaszczyk, as well as to proceed with the cross-examination of Ekrem Suljević, since these witnesses are not affected by the issues raised in the Accused’s motion. Karadžić previously requested to suspend the proceedings for three weeks so that he could review Mladić’s tapes.

26 July – 13 August 2010:  The Tribunal is in recess.

21 July 2010:  The Appeals Chamber partially quashes the acquittals of Ramush Haradinaj, a former commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) in the Dukagjin area of Kosovo; Idriz Balaj, a former member of the KLA and commander of a special unit known as the Black Eagles, and Lahi Brahimaj, who served as deputy commander of the KLA Dukagjin Operative Staff, and orders a partial re-trial of the case.  The Appeals Chamber—by majority and with Judge Robinson dissenting—granted the Prosecution’s first ground of appeal that argued the Trial Chamber erred when it refused the Prosecution’s requests for additional time to exhaust all reasonable steps to secure the testimony of two crucial witnesses and ordered the close of the Prosecution case before such steps could have been taken.  It held that, taken individually and outside the context of the trial, each of the Trial Chamber’s decisions concerning the testimony of these witnesses could be considered as falling within the scope of the Trial Chamber’s discretion, but that, when these decisions were evaluated together—and particularly in the context of the serious witness intimidation that formed the context of the trial—it was clear that the Trial Chamber seriously erred in failing to take adequate measures to secure the testimony of certain witnesses.

19 July 2010:  The Appeals Chamber denies Radovan Karadzic’s appeal from the order on the trial schedule of 27 May 2010, in which the Trial Chamber confirmed that it would sit four days per week from 31 May 2010 onwards.  The Appeals Chamber did not find that the Trial Chamber erred in equating his situation with that of an accused represented by counsel and recalled that “in general a self-represented accused is expected to undertake all the tasks normally assumed by counsel.”  The Appeals Chamber also reiterates that an accused “who decides to represent himself relinquishes many of the benefits associated with representation by counsel.”

19 July 2010:  The Trial Chamber issues an oral decision on Franko Simatovic’s request for adjournment of proceedings.  In his motion, Simatovic requests the Chamber to cancel the sessions currently scheduled for 23 and 24 August and to reconvene no later than 1 September, to allow the newly appointed Defense counsel additional time to prepare witnesses currently scheduled for after the summer recess.  The Chamber finds that the Defense had an opportunity in the past weeks to use the extra time freed up by the cancellation of hearings to prepare for the upcoming witnesses and therefore denies the motion.

14 July 2010:  The Appeals Chamber grants in part Veselin Sljivancanin’s application for a review of the Appeals Chamber Judgment of 5 May 2009.  In September 2007, Sljivancanin, a former senior officer of the JNA, was found guilty of aiding and abetting torture of non-Serb prisoners of war taken from Vukovar Hospital to a farm nearby Ovcara and was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment.  The Appeals Chamber affirmed the conviction and added a new conviction for aiding and abetting the murder of prisoners.  His sentence was increased to 17 years’ imprisonment.  In January 2010, Sljivancanin requested that the testimony of Miodrag Panic, a Yugoslav Army officer in Vukovar, be heard, arguing that his testimony would invalidate his convictions of aiding and abetting murder. Panic’s testimony was heard on 3 June 2010.  The Appeals Chamber finds that the new information provided by Panic could, if proved, fundamentally alter the balance of evidence and to ignore it would lead to a miscarriage of justice.  All parties are to submit by 30 July a list of evidence and witnesses it wishes to introduce at the Review Hearing, the date of which will be announced in due course.  This is the first time in the history of the Tribunal that a request for review of a judgment is granted. There have been ten previous application filed by convicted persons and one by the Prosecution. All have been rejected.

12-15 July 2010:  Closing arguments are being heard this week in the case of Vlastimir Dordevic, former Assistant Minister of the Serbian Ministry of Internal Affairs and Chief of its Public Security Department, on trial for war crimes committed against Kosovo Albanians.  The Prosecution is seeking 35 years to life imprisonment; the Defense confirms that it is seeking a judgment of acquittal.

7 July 2010:  The Deputy Registrar denies Vojislav Seselj’s requests for the Tribunal to fund his defense team, following the Accused’s continued failure to comply with the Registry’s requests to provide the necessary documentation regarding his financial status.

7 July 2010:  The OTP confirms that Judge Antonetti wrote to the Serbian Government requesting more information regarding the media claims in Serbia that  Vojislav Seselj ordered the political assassination of Tomislav Nikolic from his cell in the Detention Unit.  The Serbian authorities have not yet responded to the judge’s inquiry.  The Registry is aware of the allegations and is investigating the claims that there may have been a breach of security in the Detention Unit.  So far there is no indication proving the claims of the media.

5 July 2010:  The President of the Tribunal, Judge Patrick Robinson, is visiting Croatia this week at the invitation of the Supreme Court of Croatia.  During the three-day visit commencing today, the President will meet with Branko Hrvatin, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.  He will also hold a round table with select judges of the Supreme Court.  The visit is part of President Robinson’s continued efforts to intensify knowledge sharing and cooperation with local judiciaries as key part of the Tribunal’s legacy.

30 June 2010:  The Appeals Chamber terminates the appellate proceedings in the case of Rasim Delic, the former Commander of the Main Staff of the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ABIH), who died on 16 April 2010 while on provisional release in Sarajevo.  In the same decision, the Chamber ruled that the Trial Chamber’s Judgment convicting Delic, on the basis of superior responsibility, for the crimes committed by the El Mujahed Detachment of the ABIH against captive Bosnian Serb soldiers in central Bosnia, shall be considered final.

29 June 2010:  The Tribunal welcomes the resolution of the United Nations Security Council extending the terms of office of its 23 judges and the resolution’s recognition of the critical importance of staff retention to the expeditious completion of the Tribunal’s mandate.  Specifically, Security Council Resolution 1931(2010) extended the terms of five permanent judges in the Appeals Chamber until 31 December 2012 and the terms of eight permanent trial and ten ad litem judges until 31 December 2011, or until the completion of the cases to which they are assigned if sooner.  The Council also underlined its intention to extend, by 30 June 2011, the terms of office of the trial judges based on the Tribunal’s projected trial schedule.  The latest completion strategy report estimates that all first instance trials will be completed by mid-2012 with the exception of that of Radovan Karadzic, which is expected to finish in late 2012. Most appellate work is scheduled to be completed by early 2014.  Only two indictees remain at large – Ratko Mladic and Goran Hadzic.  Both the Tribunal and the Security Council have called for their arrest.

28 June 2010:  Judge Robinson grants early release for Milan Gvero (Popovic case) due to the fact that he had already served more than two thirds of his prison sentence before and during the trial and because of his urgent medical needs.

21 June 2010:  A Referral Bench denies the motion by Gojko Jankovic to revoke the referral order and return his case to the Tribunal, as well as his request to order the BiH State Court to re-try him on the basis of the Tribunal’s original indictment.  Jankovic was transferred to the BiH State Court in 2005 and sentenced there to 34 years on 19 November 2007.

18 June 2010:  The Tribunal’s President, Judge Patrick Robinson, delivers his fourth Completion Strategy report to the United Nations Security Council, highlighting the adverse impact that the alarming rate of staff attrition has had on the expeditious completion of the trials.  He also reiterates his call for the creation of a trust fund for victims of war crimes.  The President informed the Security Council that “the Tribunal has continued to work as efficiently and expeditiously as possible in accordance with the highest standards of international due process.”  All trials pending on the Tribunal’s docket have commenced, and proceedings in ten trials have been conducted simultaneously in the Tribunal’s three courtrooms.

16 June 2010:  The Trial Chamber orders the parties in the Gotovina, et al. case to file their final briefs no later than 16 July 2010 and announces that the closing arguments will take place on 25-27 August 2010.  The Prosecution will have six hours and the Defense teams will each have two and a half hours to deliver their closing arguments.

16 June 2010:  The President denies Dragan Zelenovic’s application for pardon or commutation of sentence.  Zelenovic, a former Bosnian Serb soldier, was transferred to Belgium on 27 February 2008, to serve his 15 year sentence of imprisonment for torture and rape of women and girls in the town of Foca during 1992.  The Belgian authorities recently notified the Tribunal that Zelenovic would become eligible for early release on 21 August 2010 under Belgian law, having then served one-third of his sentence.  The President indicated that the Tribunal’s practice is to consider the eligibility of a convicted person only after he has served two-thirds of his sentence, which will be on approximately 21 August 2015 in this specific case.  Moreover, the President is of the view that the gravity of Zelenovic’s offences is high and that this is a factor that weighs against his request.

15 June 2010:  Milan Gvero files a motion for early release following his conviction of 5 years last week (Popovic case).

13 June 2010:  General Momcilo Perisic’s defense case continues.  His trial was adjourned until 3,500 handwritten pages of confidential documents could be translated.

10 June 2010:  Seven former high-ranking Bosnian Serb military and police officials are convicted by Trial Chamber II of a range of crimes committed in 1995 in relation to the fall of the enclaves of Srebrenica and Zepa, eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina.  Vujadin Popovic and Ljubica Beara were found guilty of genocide, the crimes against humanity of persecution and extermination, and murder in violation of the laws or customs of war. Popovic and Beara received sentences of life in prison. Drago Nikolic, was found guilty of aiding and abetting genocide and committing the crimes against humanity of persecution and extermination, as well as murder in violation of the laws or customs of war.  Nikolic was sentenced to 35 years in prison. Ljubomir Borovcanin was convicted of aiding and abetting the crimes against humanity of extermination, persecution, and forcible transfer as an inhumane act, as well as aiding and abetting murder in violation of the laws or customs of war, and of superior responsibility for murder as a crime against humanity and as a war crime.  Borovcanin received a sentence of 17 years in prison. Radivoje Miletic was found guilty of the crimes against humanity of murder, persecution, and inhumane acts (forcible transfer).  He was sentenced to 19 years’ imprisonment.  Milan Gvero was found guilty of the crimes against humanity of persecution and inhumane acts (forcible transfer) and sentenced to 5 years’ imprisonment.  Vinko Pandurevic was found guilty of aiding and abetting the crimes against humanity of extermination, persecution, murder, and forcible transfer as an inhumane act, as well as aiding and abetting murder in violation of the laws or customs of war, and of superior responsibility for murder as a crime against humanity and as a war crime.  Pandurevic received 13 years in prison. This trial has been the largest conducted to date at the ICTY.  Hearings in the trial began on 14 July 2006 and closing arguments finished on 15 September 2009.  The Trial Chamber sat for a total of 425 days during which more than 5300 exhibits were admitted.  The evidence of 315 witnesses was presented: 182 by the Prosecution; 132 by all the Defense teams and one by the Trial Chamber.

7 June 2010:  UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon appoints Judge Kimberley Prost as Ombudsperson to the Security Council Sanctions Committee which oversees sanctions against the Taliban and Al-Qaida.  Judge Prost will assist the Committee in its consideration of requests received from individuals and entities to be removed from the Committee’s consolidated list of people facing sanctions.  Sworn in as an ICTY ad litem Judge on 3 July 2006, Judge Prost was, among other duties, assigned to the Chamber which heard the Popovic et al.

26 May 2010:  At the invitation of the President of the Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Treaty establishing the ICC, President Robinson, Prosecutor Brammertz and Registrar Hocking are traveling to Kampala, the location of the first ICC Review Conference from 31 May until 11 June.  The Review Conference is the first opportunity for the States Parties to the Rome Statute to make possible amendments to the Statute since its entry into force on 1 July 2002, and to take stock of the Treaty’s implementation so far.

26 May 2010: Prosecutor Serge Brammertz is in Croatia this week.  This is the final of his planned working visits to the region of the former Yugoslavia in preparation for the OTP's biannual report to the UN Security Council.  The main topic of the meetings with government officials will be the cooperation of Croatia with the Office of the Prosecutor and other matters related to the Tribunal’s Completion Strategy.

20 May 2010:  In Vlastimir Dordevic case, the Defense rests its case.  Closing arguments are scheduled for 13 and 14 July.  To date in this case there have been 197 trial days, 115 witnesses for the Prosecution of whom 105 testified viva voce and 28 Defense witnesses.

20 May 2010:  The Prosecutor visits Madrid to meet with Mr. Angel Moratinos, the Foreign Minister of Spain, which currently holds the Presidency of the European Union.  This meeting is the continuation of the Prosecutor's regular working meetings.  Prosecutor Brammertz and Mr. Moratinos will discuss issues relevant to the work of the Office of the Prosecutor, the Tribunal's completion strategy and the cooperation of states.

19 May 2010:  The Appeals Chamber affirms Vojslav Seselj’s contempt conviction and his sentence of fifteen months imprisonment.  On 24 July 2009, Trial Chamber II found Seselj guilty of contempt for knowingly disclosing confidential information regarding protected witnesses.  The Appeals Chamber dismissed all eight of Seselj’s grounds of appeal.

19 May 2010:  In the Boskoski and Tarculovski case, Appeals Chamber affirms the conviction of Johan Tarculovski, a former police officer of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) for having ordered, planned and instigated crimes committed against ethnic Albanians during a police operation conducted on 12 August 2001 in the village of Ljuboten in the northern part of the FYROM.  His sentence of 12 years imprisonment was upheld.  The Appeals Chamber also affirms the acquittal of Ljube Boskoski, Minister of Interior of the FYROM from May 2001 until November 2002.

19 May 2010:  President Robinson issues a report on the Conference, “Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY,” held in The Hague on 23-24 February.  The report details the Conference's key findings and strategic considerations, as well as the plans pertaining to the Tribunal's legacy. Both the report and recordings of the entire Conference are now available on the Tribunal’s website.

19 May 2010:  The Tribunal is hosting a group of Serbian journalists for a four-day visit.  The visit is organized by the OSCE mission to Serbia and the Tribunal’s Outreach program.  During this visit the journalists, many of whom have covered war crimes issues extensively during their careers, will discuss issues such as what constitutes good court reporting and the role of the media in promoting reconciliation in post-war societies.

18 May 2010:  In the Sainovic et al. case, the parties meet before Judge Liu for a Status Conference with all the appellants present.

17 May 2010:  The Appeals Chamber denies General Lazarevic 's request for provisional release to go to Serbia and undergo an operation of the thrombotic vein of his right leg at the Military Hospital of Nis.  The Chamber found that Lazarevic failed to demonstrate why the required treatment can only be administered in Serbia.

13 May 2010:  President Robinson denies Dario Kordic’s request for early release.  Dario Kordic, a former leading political figure in the Bosnian Croat community, was sentenced in February 2001 to 25 years’ imprisonment for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslim civilians in the vicinity of the Lasva Valley in central Bosnia and Herzegovina.  Under Austrian law, Kordic became eligible for conditional release after serving one-half of his prison sentence.  However, President Robinson noted that the majority of ICTY convicts do not become eligible before having served two-thirds of their sentence, and expressed the view that “the amount of time that Mr. Kordic has served for his crimes does not militate in favor of his early release."

13 May 2010:  The Office of the Prosecutor files a motion to amend the indictment against Ratko Mladic, former Commander of the Main Staff of the Bosnian Serb Army (VRS).  The proposed amended indictment charges Mladic with 11 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and violations of the laws and customs of war in relation to the ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1992-1995, the terror campaign against civilians during the siege of Sarajevo from 1992-1995, the taking of UN personnel as hostages in May and June 1995, and the genocide in Srebrenica in July 1995.

12-13 May 2010:  Prosecutor Brammertz visits Belgrade where he is available to the media at the Media Center of the Special Court in Belgrade.

12 May 2010:  The Appeals Judgment in the case against Ljube Boskoski and Johan Tarculovski, involving crimes committed against ethnic Albanians in the village of Ljuboten near the Macedonian capital Skopje, is scheduled to be rendered on Wednesday 19 May.

12 May 2010:  The Tribunal notes with concern the reports that Radislav Krstic was assaulted while serving his sentence in Britain.  The Tribunal's convicts serve their sentences in the states with which the Tribunal has entered an enforcement of sentence agreement.  Conditions of detention are governed by regulations of that state, while independent inspecting organizations also visit the convicts periodically.  The Tribunal is confident that the responsible authorities will investigate the matter fully and take the appropriate steps.

10 May 2010:  Trial Chamber I issues a Decision granting Ivan Cermak’s and Mladan Markac’s request for certification to appeal the Trial Chamber’s decision of 21 April 2010 to reopen the Prosecution case in order to present new evidence.  In their motions, the Defense teams argue that the decision to reopen the Prosecution case adversely affects the fair and expeditious conduct of the proceedings and the rights of the accused.  The Trial Chamber granted the request to appeal the decision on the basis that the introduction of new evidence could have significant bearing on the individual criminal responsibility of the accused.  The Chamber emphasized that the ultimate significance of the evidence will only be determined in the final judgment, in light of all other evidence.

6 May 2010:  At his further initial appearance at his trial for contempt of court, Vojislav Seselj once more declines to enter a plea.  This led to the Presiding Judge directing the Registrar to enter a plea of not guilty on his behalf.

6 May 2010:  In the Vlastimir Dordevic case, Trial Chamber II issues an order scheduling the closing arguments for 13 and 14 July 2010.

5 May 2010:  Christian Chartier announces that the date set for the Tribunal’s biannual report to the UN Security Council, presented by both the President and the Prosecutor, is 18 June 2010.

5 May 2010:  Trial Chamber II announces that it will pronounce its judgment in the Popovic et al. case on Thursday, 10 June 2010 at 10:00 in Courtroom III.  This judgment will bring to an end the largest trial ever held at the Tribunal, involving seven accused.  The seven co-accused in this case, all former military and police officers of Republika Srpska, are charged with genocide (with the exception of Milan Gvero and Radivoje Miletic) and crimes against humanity committed in Srebrenica and Zepa in July 1995.  The trial started on 14 July 2006 and closed on 15 September 2009.  The trial took a total of 425 days during which more than 5400 exhibits were tendered into evidence and 315 witnesses were called:  182 by the Prosecution; 132 by all the Defense teams and one by the Trial Chamber.  All final briefs were filed confidentially except for that of Ljubomir Borovcanin which can be accessed on the court records database.

4 May 2010:  Prosecutor Brammertz is in Brussels to meet with the Western Balkans Working Group of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament.  The Prosecutor is also meeting with Mr. Stefan Fule, the EU Commissioner for Enlargement.  The topics of the meetings are the work of the Office of the Prosecutor, including the ongoing trials and appeals, the Tribunal's completion strategy and the cooperation of States.

3 May 2010:  In the Peresic case, the parties discuss procedural matters.  Due to a number of new documents, which need to be translated, the trial is provisionally adjourned until June 2010 (provisional date).

29 April 2010:  The Tribunal’s Registrar, John Hocking, visits the region (Zagreb and Belgrade) for the first time since his appointment as Registrar.  The Registrar is accompanied by his Chief of Office, Martin Petrov, and the Tribunal's spokesperson, Nerma Jelacic, and is holding a series of meetings in both capitals with Justice Ministers, Heads of Offices for Cooperation with the Tribunal, judicial authorities, and NGO representatives.  The Registrar is also meeting with local representatives of international organizations such as the EU, the OSCE, and the UNDP.  The main topics of discussion include the Completion Strategy, the legacy of the ICTY and Outreach.

29 April 2010:  In the Seselj contempt case, the parties meet before Judge Hall for the initial appearance of Vojislav Seselj.  The accused declined to enter a plea.

23 April 2010:  The Office of the Prosecutor announces that, as part of his working visit to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Prosecutor Brammertz will be in Srebrenica on 27 April 2010.  The Prosecutor will be briefly available to the media at the Srebrenica Municipality Office.  This will be the first of his planned working visits to the region of the former Yugoslavia in preparation for the OTP's biannual report to the UN Security Council.

23 April 2010:  Judge Robinson decides that Mlado Radic should not be granted early release in response to Radic’s application for pardon or commutation of sentence.

23 April 2010:  The Chamber issues a public redacted version of the confidential decision granting provisional release for Ivan Cermak from 29 March until 12 April 2010.

22 April 2010:  The Gotovina trial adjourns sine die and the Presiding Judge announces that the Prosecution will re-open its case.  The Chamber also suspended the deadline for the filing of final briefs.

22 April 2010:  The Initial Appearance in the contempt of court case of Vojislav Seselj is scheduled for 29 April 2010 at 14:30 in Courtroom I, before Judge O-Gon Kwon.  The leader of the Serb Radical Party currently standing trial at the Tribunal for alleged crimes committed in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia between 1991 and 1994, is accused of having disclosed information on 11 protected witnesses, including their real names, occupations and places of residence, in violation of the Trial Chamber’s orders in a book he authored.

21 April 2010:  The Defense for Rasim Delic notifies the Tribunal that Delic had died at his home in Sarajevo on 16 April. The Defense also submitted to the Appeals Chamber that “the appeal proceedings should continue” and informed the Chamber “that General Delic’s family … authorize and request the appeals proceedings to conclude with the issuance of the Appeal Chamber’s judgment.”  The Prosecution filed its response, submitting that the Appeals Chamber should continue the proceedings in the interests of justice and issue an Appeals Judgment in this case.  The Appeals Chamber is now considering the Parties’ submissions.

19 April 2010:  Trial Chamber II postpones the Initial Appearance of Vojislav Seselj in his contempt of court case due to the unavailability of the Amicus Curiae Prosecutor at the scheduled time as a result of the current widespread air traffic disruption.

15 April 2010:  In the Karadzic case, the Chamber designates Richard Harvey as standby counsel and requests the Registry and the Prosecution to continue to take all necessary measures to ensure Harvey is able to fulfill his role.

14 April 2010:  The Tribunal is hosting three outreach visits from the former Yugoslavia: one by 19 students of law from Slovenia who were introduced to the work and achievements of the Tribunal; one by 15 journalists from the Western Balkans; and one by a group of Croatian war crimes trial monitors and journalists.

14 April 2010:  Registrar John Hocking attends a three day meeting of Registrars of appellate, regional and international courts in Ottawa, Canada.  Hosted by the Supreme Court of Canada, the meeting is designed to address specific institutional and operational challenges and allow participating Registrars to exchange best practices on issues such as organizational structure and procedure, security of infrastructure and documents, translation and interpretation services, witness and victims protection programs and enforcement of sentences.  Registrar Hocking will address the meeting on Legal Aid and Defense Support at the ICTY.

14 April 2010:  In the case of Prlic and others, the Coric defense rests its case on 1 April.  The defense team of the last of six accused, Berislav Pusic, announced on 7 April that they will not call any witnesses. The next trial date is to be determined.


13 April 2010: Radovan Karadzic's trial commences with the testimony of the prosecution's first witness, Ahmet Zulic, who previously testified before the Tribunal in the cases of Brdjanin, Milosevic and Krajisnik. The trial is scheduled to continue three days a week.

9 April 2010: Radovan Karadzic notifies the Trial Chamber that he will need 155 hours to cross-examine the Prosecution's first 12 witnesses. The Prosecution will tender into evidence the prior testimony before the Tribunal of all 12 witnesses pursuant to 92bis and 92ter of the Tribunal's Rules of Procedure.

1 April 2010: The Tribunal's Appeals Chamber dismisses Radovan Karadzic's appeal against the Trial Chamber's 26 February 2010 ruling refusing to suspend his case until 17 June 2010 on account of the Registrar's alleged grant of insufficient funding for Karadzic's defense team.

30 March 2010: The Prosecution responds to a motion filed by Vojislav Seselj on 18 March 2010 requesting that the Trial Chamber issue subpoenas for former Chief Prosecutor Carla Del Ponte and former Deputy Prosecutor David Tolbert, by contesting Seselj's assertion that Del Ponte and Tolbert conducted interviews of Tomislav Nikolic.

30 March 2010: A Dutch Appellate Court affirms a lower court's 2008 ruling that the Mothers of Srebrenica, a group of surviving relatives of the men who were killed in Srebrenica in 1995, cannot sue the United Nations for its failure to prevent mass atrocity. The court asserted that under international law the U.N. peacekeepers have complete immunity from prosecution. In 1999 the U.N. conceded that it erred in presuming that the approximately 100 Dutch peacekeepers would sufficiently deter attack by Serb forces.

19 March 2010: Ante Gotovina files notice of appeal against the Trial Chamber's 15 March 2010 decision denying Gotovina's motion requesting the ICTY to order a halt to the Croatian Government's investigation of members of Gotovina's defense team suspected of hiding or destroying documents from state archives.

16 March 2010: Speaking at a press conference in New York, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon asserts that the Tribunal will remain open through 2013.

1-2 March 2010: Radovan Karadzic presents his opening statement and files a motion to appeal the Trial Chamber’s decision to deny Karadzic’s request to postpone his trial until 17 June 2010.

26 February 2010: The trial of Zdravko Tolimir begins. Tolimir is charged with genocide, conspiracy to commit genocide, crimes against humanity, and violations of the laws or customs of war committed against Bosnian Muslims in the eastern Bosnian cities of Srebrenica and Zepa in 1995. He is the last accused currently in ICTY custody to face trial.

26 February 2010: Trial Chamber dismisses Radovan Karadzic’s motion to postpone his trial until 17 July 2010. Karadzic’s motion sought additional time in which to prepare his defense, alleging that the Registrar had not provided sufficient funds for his defense team.

23 February 2010: The Tribunal convenes a conference on “Assessing the Legacy of the ICTY” in the Hague.

12 February 2010: Appeals Chamber denies Radovan Karadzic’s motion to vacate the appointment of Richard Harvey as his standby counsel. The ruling held that because Karadzic is representing himself, he “does not enjoy any rights that are derived from choosing to be represented by legal counsel.”

4 February 2010: Trial Chamber II files an order to initiate contempt of court proceedings against Vojislav Seselj for allegedly disclosing the real names, occupations, and places of residence of 11 protected witnesses. The Registrar will appoint an amicus curiae prosecutor to take up the charges. On 24 July 2009 Seselj was found guilty of contempt and sentenced to 15 months imprisonment for publicly disclosing identifying information of protected witnesses.

4 February 2010: Reverend Jesse Jackson visits the ICTY to meet with senior officials of the Tribunal.

1 February 2010: Radovan Karadzic files a motion to postpone his trial pending the ruling of the Appeals Chamber on Karadzic’s earlier appeal against the manner that the Defense is financed, and the appointment of Richard Harvey as his standby counsel. The trial is currently scheduled to begin on 1 March 2010.

28 January 2010: Radovan Karadzic alleges that the position of his defense has deteriorated significantly during a status conference convened before presiding Judge O-Gon Kwon. Karadzic claims that he has encountered difficulty in acquiring documents that he has requested from governments and international organizations.

25-27 January 2010: Patricia O’Brien, the UN Under-Secretary General for Legal Affairs visits the ICTY to discuss the Tribunal’s completion strategy and proposed residual mechanisms for maintaining the Tribunal’s legacy.

21 January 2010: The ICTY Registry submits a motion in the case of Vojislav Seselj in reply to the 12 January 2010 Order of the Trial Chamber requesting the Registry to review 12 of Seselj’s books for disclosed confidential information concerning witness identity. The motion asserts that the Registry is neither authorized nor sufficiently funded to complete document review for an ongoing trail.

19 January 2010: In the appellate hearing of Bosnian General Rasim Delic, the Prosecutor asks the Appeals Chamber to increase the sentence from 3 to 7 years for General Delic’s failure to prevent and punish crimes against Serbs perpetrated by members of the El Mujahid Detachment under his command between July and August 1995.

12 January 2010: The Prosecution resumes direct examinations of its final witnesses in the trial of Vojislav Seselj after an 11-month adjournment. Seselj requests that the Tribunal grant him permission to carry out a public telephone press conference prior to the by-election of in the Odzaci municipality in Vojvodina, citing the Tribunal’s willingness to allow both Radovan Karadzic and Ramush Haradinaj to be politically active during the course of ongoing proceedings against them.

5 January 2010: The Tribunal’s Outreach Programme completes the second stage of its Kosovo high school outreach project aiming to familiarize teenagers about the work of the court. The project reached out to 14 schools and approximately 450 students.

22 December 2009: The Tribunal carries out the initial hearing of Zuhdija Tabakovic’s contempt of court case. The indictment against Tabakovic was filed confidentially on 30 October 2009, and proceedings are completed in closed session.

3 December 2009: Prosecutor Serge Brammertz and President Patrick Robinson address the UN Security Council, providing an update on the status of ongoing trials and appeals. Prosecutor Brammertz informs the Security Council that prosecution lawyers are currently undertaking a review of fugitive Ratko Mladic’s indictment with the intent of filing amendments.

1 December 2009: Judge Prisca Matimba Nyambe of Zambia is sworn in as an ad litem judge. Judge Nyambe will sit on the trial of Zdravko Tolimir.

25 November 2009: Trial Chamber III orders trial of Vojislav Seselj to resume on 12 January 2010  citing the length of the detention of the accused and new facts that have arose since proceedings were temporarily adjourned on 11 February 2009. The Trial Chamber determined that it will examine six of the remaining Prosecution witnesses who have indicated that they no longer want to testify on behalf of the Prosecution, but instead on behalf of the accused.

24 November 2009: An Administrative Hearing is conducted in the case of Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav Seselj to make further determinations concerning the continuation of trial proceedings. In February 2009, Seselj’s trial was adjourned until further notice because of witness intimidation.

20 November 2009:  The ICTY Registrar appoints British lawyer Richard Harvey to serve as stand-by defense counsel for Radovan Karadzic.

13 November 2009: Former security chief in the JNA Guards Brigade Veselin Sljivancanin files a motion for reconsideration of the Appeals Chamber verdict of 5 May 2009. Sljivancanin was sentenced by the Trial Chamber to 5 years imprisonment for aiding and abetting torture in September 2007. The Appeals Chamber found Sljivancanin guilty of aiding and abetting the murder of prisoners of war in Vukovar, Croatia, and increased his sentence to 17 years imprisonment.

12 November 2009: The Appeals Chamber partially upholds the Trial Chamber’s findings in the case of Sarajevo-Romanija Corps commander Dragomir Milosevic, reducing his prison sentence from 33 to 29 years. In December 2007 Milosevic was convicted for the siege of Sarajevo, a sniper and artillery fire campaign against the Bosnian capital between August 1994 and November 1995. The Appeals Chamber denied the Prosecution’s only appeal requesting that Milosevic’s sentence be increased to life imprisonment.

11 November 2009: Radovan Karadzic applies for certification to appeal the Trial Chamber’s decision on appointment of a stand-by counsel on 5 November 2009.

5 November 2009: The Trial Chamber issues a decision ordering the ICTY Registrar to appoint a stand-by defense counsel for Radovan Karadzic. The defense counsel will step in and try the case on Karadzic’s behalf if Karadzic further obstructs the proper and expeditious course of the trial. Karadzic’s trial is scheduled to resume 1 March 2010.

3 November 2009: UN judges hold a hearing on how to continue the genocide trial of Radovan Karadzic if the former Bosnian Serb leader continues to boycott the case.

2 November 2009: Radovan Karadzic says he will appear before the tribunal the following day. He will argue for more time to prepare; one of his legal advisors said he would argue for 10 months to prepare. Judge O-Gon Kwon warned that Karadzic should attend the trial. Otherwise, counsel might be appointed for him.

29 October 2009: The ICTY hears an appeal on behalf of Johan Tarculovski, the only Macedonian sentenced to jail by the court. Tarculovski is looking to overturn the 12-year jail sentence handed down in July 2008. The ICTY found him guilty of war crimes committed while serving as a police commander during the 2001 Macedonian armed conflict. The ICTY is expected to rule on the appeal by early 2010. 

27 October 2009: Prosecutors deliver their opening arguments in the Karadzic case. They played audio tapes for the court of Karadzic discussing the genocide. Karadzic continued his boycott of the proceedings.

27 October 2009: Biljana Plavsic arrives in Belgrade following her early release from a prison in Sweden, where she had been serving an 11-year sentence for war crimes. The ICTY decided last month that she should be set free, citing her good behavior. Under Swedish law, Plavsic was eligible for release after serving two-thirds of her prison term.

26 October 2009: Judge Patrick Robinson and Judge O-Gon Kwon are reelected to two-year terms as President and Vice President by the permanent judges of the ICTY. 

24 October 2009: Tribunal President Patrick Robinson presents the ICTY’s sixteenth annual report before the UN General Assembly highlighting the Tribunal’s achievements and remaining challenges. In his address, President Robinson noted that the Tribunal expected to conclude all but one trial by early 2011. The one remaining case, that of Radovan Karadzic, will likely wrap up in early 2012.

16 October 2009: ICTY announces it will separate the cases against Mladic and Karadzic so that no court decisions on Karadzic will impact the Mladic case.

13 October 2009: Appeals Chamber rejects Karadzic's appeal of the decision on commencement of trial, meaning that the Karadzic trial will commence on 26 October 2009. Karadzic had requested more time to prepare his defense. 

12 October 2009: Appeals Chamber dismisses Karadzic's appeal of the Trial Chamber's decision on an alleged  cooperation agreement made with  Richard  Holbrooke. The Appeals Chamber found that “even if the alleged Agreement were proved, it would not limit the jurisdiction of the Tribunal, it would not otherwise be binding on the Tribunal and it would not trigger the doctrine of abuse of process.”   

24 September 2009: Florence Hartman’s defense files notice of appeal. The defense alleges that Hartman was denied her right to a fair impartial trial and that there were over 120 legal and factual errors that amount to a miscarriage of justice.

23 September 2009: ICTY launches report concerning judicial sector capacity building and the needs of local courts in conducting war crimes cases within the former Yugoslavia. The report titled “Supporting the Transition Process: Lessons Learned and Best Practices in Knowledge Transfer,” is product of collaboration between the ICTY, OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights and the UN Inter-regional Crime and Justice Research Institute.

23 September 2009:
ICTY Outreach Programme launches educational curriculum in a Kosovo high school for 12th graders during the 2009-2010 academic year. The program focuses on raising awareness about the tribunal’s work.

23 September 2009: Prosecution in case of Radovan Karadzic refuses request of pre-trial judges to further reduce the indictment by decreasing the number of crime scenes and charges alleged. The indictment was previously reduced on the request of pre-trial judges in February 2009.

16 Septmber 2009: Croatian General Ante Gotovina’s defense rests his case. The trial moves to the defense of the second accused, Ivan Cermak.

14 September 2009: The trial of Mićo Stanišić and Stojan Župljanin, members of the Serbian police and security services, commences with an opening statement form the prosecution. Stanišić and Župljanin are charged with responsibility for crimes committed by police forces under their control in Bosnia and Herzegovina between April and December 1992. The alleged crimes include extermination, murder, deportation and torture of non-Serb civilians.

14 September 2009: The Specially Appointed Chamber convicts Florence Hartmann, former spokeswoman for the Office of the Prosecutor, of contempt of court for disclosing confidential information used in two Appeals Chamber decisions in the Milosevic trial. The Chamber found that Hartman knowingly violated a court order and handed down a fine of 7,000 Euros. The defense indicated that it may pursue an appeal within the ICTY Appeals Chamber and European Court of Human Rights.

7 September 2009: Bosnian Serb leader Momčilo Krajišnik is transferred to the United Kingdom to serve his 20-year sentence for crimes committed by subordinates against non-Serb civilians during the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

24 July 2009: Trial Chamber II convicts Vojislav Šešelj of contempt of the Tribunal and sentences him to 15 months imprisonment for disclosing the name and other personal details of protected witnesses in a book he authored.

23 July 2009: The Appeals Chamber reverses Astrit Haraqija’s conviction and affirms Bajrush Morina’s conviction and sentence for contempt of the Tribunal for intimidating a protected witness in the trial of the former Kosovo Albanian military leader Ramush Haradinaj and others.On 17 December 2008, Trial Chamber I found both Haraqija and Morina, ethnic Albanians from Kosovo, guilty of having knowingly and willfully interfered with the administration of justice by interfering with a protected witness in the Haradinaj et al. case.

20 July 2009: Trial Chamber III convicts Milan Lukić and Sredoje Lukić to life and 30 years’ imprisonment respectively for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in the eastern Bosnian town of Višegrad during the 1992-1995 conflict. 

8 July 2009: The UN Security Council extends the terms of office for the judges serving at the ICTY. Permanent trial and ad litem judges are extended until 31 December 2010 or until the completion of the cases to which they are assigned, if sooner.

3 July 2009: The Appeals Chamber affirms the contempt of court conviction of former Bosnian Serb Army officer Dragan Jokić. Jokić was sentenced earlier this year to four months imprisonment for refusing to testify in the case of Popović and others. 

1 July 2009: Prosecutor Serge Brammertz welcomes liaison prosecutors from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, and Serbia as they arrive in The Hague to work for the next six months with the staff in the Tribunal’s Office of the Prosecutor. 

26 June 2009: Milan Martić, the former wartime political leader of Croatian Serbs, is transferred today to Estonia to serve his 35-year sentence for crimes committed against Croats and other non-Serbs in Croatia between 1991 and 1994.

24 June 2009: The Trial Chamber in the case of Momčilo Perišić, former Chief of the General Staff of the Yugoslav Army, begins a seven-day site visit to Zagreb, Sarajevo, and Srebrenica. The Trial Chamber’s decision to conduct a site visit was taken sua sponte by the Chamber, which explained the visit would assist in understanding the facts at issue.

12 June 2009: Judge Patrick Robinson begins his first official visit to the region of the former Yugoslavia since being elected as the Tribunal’s President. He will be in the region from 12 to 17 June and plans to travel to Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Slovenia.

5 June 2009: The trial of Jovica Stanisic, a former close aide to Serbian wartime leader Slobodan Milosević, and Franko Simatović, a former elite Serb forces commander, is scheduled to recommence with the opening statement of the Prosecution on Tuesday, 9 June 2009. 

28 May 2009: The Tribunal launches the ICTY Manual on Developed Practices today. The publication aims to preserve the institution’s legacy and aid jurisdictions facing the responsibility of adjudicating international crimes. This is the first publication that provides a comprehensive description of the operating practices that have developed at the ICTY, including topics of investigation, judgment drafting, and management of the Detention Unit and legal aid policies.

13 May 2009: John Hocking is appointed as the new Registrar of the Tribunal. His appointment is effective 15 May 2009. 

5 May 2009: The Appeals Chamber finds Veselin Šljivančanin, a former senior officer of the Yugoslav People’s Army, guilty of aiding and abetting the war crime of murdering prisoners of war after the fall of the Croatian town of Vukovar and confirms his guilt for aiding and abetting torture as a war crime, increasing his sentence from 5 to 17 years imprisonment. The Appeals Chamber also reaffirms the guilt of Šljivančanin’s superior, Mile Mrkšić, for several war crimes and upholds his 20 year sentence of imprisonment.

27 April 2009: The U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes, Clint Williamson, visited the Tribunal today and met with President Patrick Robinson, Prosecutor Serge Brammertz, and Acting Registrar John Hocking.

8 April 2009: The Tribunal’s Appeals Chamber orders the provisional release of Astrit Haraqija, the former Kosovo Minister for Culture, Youth, and Sport, from the Tribunal’s Detention Unit. Haraquija has completed the five month sentence imposed for contempt of court. 

6 April 2009: The Tribunal’s public Court Records database is launched today, containing all Tribunal public court records from the first filing submitted in 1994 until today.

2 April 2009: State and War Crimes Prosecutors from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and the ICTY are meeting today and tomorrow in Brussels, Belgium. The primary goal of the conference is to further strengthen regional cooperation in the investigation and prosecution of war crimes cases. The conference also launches the “Joint European Commission and ICTY Training Project for National Prosecutors and Young Professionals from the former Yugoslavia.” This project aims to create an opportunity for legal professionals from the region of the former Yugoslavia to work with the Tribunal’s Office of the Prosecutor staff to further capacity building and knowledge transfer.

27 March 2009: The ICTY’s Chief Prosecutor Serge Brammertz is due to meet Serbian War Crimes Prosecutor Vladimir Vukcevic on the second day of his trip to Belgrade. Brammertz arrived in Serbia on Thursday and met Serbian President Boris Tadic, Interior Minister Ivica Dacic and the President of the National Council for Hague Cooperation, Rasim Ljajic. As announced from the President's cabinet, during the meeting with Brammertz, Tadic said that the Serbian government and all of it's bodies fully cooperate with The Hague Tribunal.  Tadic added that Serbia has so far extradited to The Hague 44 people indicted for war crimes and that it is completely aware of its legal obligation to extradite two more of them: Ratko Mladic and Goran Hadzic. Ljajic suggested that Serbian residents sentenced at The Hague serve their prison sentences in Serbia. Ljajic told a press conference that he thinks this idea could be accepted by The Hague Tribunal. “Unfortunately, there is one obstacle: the recommandation made in 1993 by UN General Secretary that all the convicted must not serve their sentences in the area of the former Yugoslavia,“ said Ljajic. He said Brammertz pointed out some of the problems that could appear if the idea got the go-ahead but he did show sympathy for it.

27 March 2009: Trial Chamber II convicts Dragan Jokić of contempt for refusing to testify in the trial of Popović and sentences him to four months in prison. The Chamber noted that Jokić’s refusal to testify keeps relevant information from coming to light and goes against the “interests of justice.” Jokić was previously convicted for aiding and abetting the extermination, murder, and persecution of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica in 1995 and is currently serving his nine year sentence for those crimes.

27 March 2009: Kenyan authorities release the man that they had believed to be Ratko Mladic after confirmation that it was not him. Ratko Mladic is wanted by the ICTY for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity for his part in the Srebrenica massacre in 1995.

26 March 2009: Kenyan authorities detain a man they believe to be Ratko Mladic, who is wanted by the ICTY for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity for his part in the Srebrenica massacre in 1995.

25 March 2009: After several attempts over six months, Ivan Jurasinovic, attorney for the Kovac family, manages to send a one million euro lawsuit to Radovan Karadzic at ICTY detention unit. ICTY indictee Radovan Karadzic, wartime President of Republika Srpska, who is held at the Detention Unit of the International Criminal Court for the former Yugoslavia, ICTY, accepted the suit, filed by the Kovac family, requesting compensation to the amount of one million euros for having been deported from their home in Foca in 1992, said Ivan Jurasinovic. Besides Karadzic, the Kovac family sues Biljana Plavsic, Momcilo Krajisnik and Ratko Mladic, requesting compensation for the damage caused by the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Prosecution is charging Karadzic with a number of crimes committed throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina, including genocide in Srebrenica and ten other municipalities. The indictment mentions Momcilo Krajisnik and Biljana Plavsic as his closest associates, who were all members of the General Command of the armed forces of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina as of 1992.

20 March 2009: At a status conference held before the Hague Tribunal Chamber Stojan Zupljanin says he wants to prepare his defence while at liberty.  Stojan Zupljanin, who is charged before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, ICTY, together with Mico Stanisic, with crimes against humanity and violation of the laws and customs of war, has asked the Court to allow him to "prepare" his defence "while at liberty". Since Zupljanin presented this request orally at a status conference, the Chamber advised him to file a motion following "appropriate procedures and channels". After having been on the run for nine years, Zupljanin was arrested in Serbia in June 2008. Stanisic surrendered in March 2005. The Prosecution charges the two indictees with participation in a joint criminal enterprise, as well as persecution, extermination, murder, torture and inhumane acts. Stanisic was Minister of the Interior of the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, while Zupljanin was Chief of the Regional Safety Services Center in Banja Luka and internal affairs advisor to the RS President. In July 2008 Stanisic received permission to defend himself while at liberty. He therefore did not attend the status conference.

18 March 2009: Jadranko Prlic, a former official of the so-called Croatian community of Herzeg-Bosnia, who is on trial at The Hague, asks the Court, via his legal representative, to be temporarily released from custody until the verdict has been handed down. Prlic, Slobodan Praljak, Milivoje Petkovic, Bruno Stojic, Valentin Coric and Berislav Pusic are charged before the ICTY with participation in war crimes committed in Gornji Vakuf, Jablanica, Mostar, Ljubuski, Prozor, Capljina and Vares municipalities in the course of 1992 and 1993.  Prlic's Defence based the temporary custody release motion on the fact that this represents the indictee's "fundamental human right". "Keeping Prlic unnecessarily in custody, even when there are factors that go in favour of his temporary release, is in contradiction with the presumption of innocence. At the same time it violates his right to a fair trial," the motion reads.  It further argues that the time Prlic has spent in custody has been "unjustifiably long" and that this violates his human rights.

17 March 2009: The Appeals Chamber sentences Momčilo Krajišnik to 20 years’ imprisonment, reducing his original sentence of 27 years. Krajišnik had been convicted in 2006 of murder, extermination, persecution, deportation and forcible transfer of non-Serbs in the early 1990s. The Chamber upheld the guilty verdicts on the charges of deportation, forcible transfer and persecution, but reversed the convictions for murder and extermination. The Chamber found that the Trial Chamber had failed to identity when the murder and extermination became part of the goals of the joint criminal enterprise. The Chamber found that the gravity of the crimes he was still convicted of required a severe sentence.

12 March 2009: European Parliament votes in favor of a proposal to ask the UN Security Council to extend the mandate of ICTY by 2 years until 2010.

12 March 2009: Soldiers of the EU's peacekeeping mission, EUFOR, supported by NATO and local police, searches a house of a close associate of the war-time Bosnian Serb commander and war-crimes suspect, Ratko Mladic, for material that would help reveal his whereabouts. Around 4:00 am on Thursday, some 60 EUFOR soldiers started searching the house of Dusko Todic, a former military associate of Mladic, in the northwestern town of Banja Luka, in the Serb-dominated Bosnian entity of Republika Srpska. The raid was launched after a specific request made by the International War Crimes Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia, ICTY. The ICTY, EUFOR and NATO have been regularly searching for Mladic, the only high-level Bosnian Serb war crimes suspect who still remains in hiding a full 13 years after the war. According to different local and international officials, Mladic has been spending most of his time in Serbia lately.

4 March 2009: American Professor Charles Ingrao says research shows US military often encountered Hague tribunal’s top war-crimes indictee in 1996 but failed to arrest him because that was not then their policy. Purdue University History Professor Charles Ingrao says the US military saw Ratko Mladic at least 20 times in 1996 alone but the Pentagon was not then interested in capturing war crimes indictees in Bosnia and Herzegovina.  The startling claim, one in a series of controversial claims concerning the role played by the United States and its allies in post-Dayton Bosnia, appears in a broad work of investigative research undertaken by 300 scholars from the Western Balkans and beyond. But, there is more, Ingrao says. On several other occasions the same unit escorted US Colonel John Batiste and a military policeman to Republika Srpska Army regimental headquarters on Mt Zepa for face-to-face meetings with Mladic, allegedly to negotiate his voluntary surrender.

3 March 2009: Trial Chamber III enters a plea of “not guilty” on the behalf of Radovan Karadžić after he refused to enter a plea based on the latest amended indictment. Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

2 March 2009: The Initial Appearance in the contempt of court case of Vojislav Šešelj is scheduled for 6 March 2009 at 14:30 in Courtroom I, before Judge Carmel Agius.  Šešelj, the leader of the Serb Radical Party currently standing trial at the Tribunal for alleged crimes in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia between 1991 and 1994, is accused of disclosing the name and other personal details of three protected witnesses. Šešelj is alleged to have authored a book in which the information was published, along with other material such as excerpts of the written statement of one of these witnesses, the disclosure of which was prohibited. Trial Chamber II issued its Order in lieu of an Indictment on 21 January 2009.

2 March 2009: The Los Angeles Times reports that the trusted chief of Slobodan Milosevic's intelligence service,Jovica Stanisic, was in fact working with the CIA for eight years.  The Los Angeles Times wrote on Sunday that Jovica Stanisic, "accused of setting up genocidal death squads," was "a valuable source for the CIA. An agency veteran even says that he also 'did a whole lot of good.'"  Facing a war crimes trial at the Hague Tribunal, Stanisichas called in a favour with his American allies, the paper says. "In an exceedingly rare move, the CIA has submitted a classified document to the court that listsStanisic's contributions and attests to his helpful role."  The newspaper says that the document remains sealed, but that its contents were described by sources to its reporter. The report claims that Stanisic was recruited by CIA in Belgrade in 1992, by the now-retired William Lofgren.

27 February 2009: The prosecution in the case against Radovan Karadžić issues a final amended indictment.  Karadžić will be asked to enter a plea on March 3. Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

26 February 2009: Former Yugoslav Deputy Prime Minister, Nikola Šainović, Yugoslav Army (VJ) General, Nebojša Pavković and Serbian police General Sreten Lukić, former high-ranking Yugoslav and Serbian political, military, and police officials, are convicted by Trial Chamber III of the Tribunal for crimes against humanity committed in Kosovo in 1999. Each are sentenced to 22 years’ imprisonment for crimes against humanity and violation of the laws or customs of war. Yugoslav Army General, Vladimir Lazarević and Chief of the General Staff, Dragoljub Ojdanić were found guilty of aiding and abetting the commission of a number of charges of deportation and forcible transfer of the ethnic Albanian population of Kosovo and each sentenced to 15 years’ imprisonment. Milan Milutinović, the former President of Serbia, was acquitted of all charges.

26 February 2009: The Trial Chamber asks the prosecution in the case against Radovan Karadžić to file an amended indictment after agreeing to reconsider one of the murder charges that it had originally refused to add to the indictment. On February 20, the prosecution had asked the Chamber to reconsider the charge because it had the evidence for it but had failed to give it to the judge because of a clerical error.  Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

20 February 2009: Pavle Strugar, a former General of the Yugoslav People’s Army convicted of crimes in the Croatian coastal town of Dubrovnik in 1991 and sentenced to seven and a half years’ imprisonment, is released having been in the Tribunal’s detention facility for more than two-thirds of his sentence. The Tribunal’s Statute allows for convicted persons to apply for pardon, commutation of sentence or early release and states that the President of the Tribunal will determine whether to grant such requests. The President considered several factors when evaluating Strugar’s application including the gravity of crimes for which he was convicted, previous practice and the prisoner’s demonstration of rehabilitation, as well as Strugar’s “deteriorating medical condition.”

20 February 2009: The prosecution in the case against Radovan Karadžić asks the Trial Chamber to reconsider its decision on the amended indictment. On 16 February, the Trial Chamber approved most of the amended indictment but denied the request to add three counts of murder. The prosecution wants one of the charges reinstated because they have the evidence necessary for it, but failed to give it to the judge because of a clerical error. As a result Karadžić was not asked to enter a plea on the amended indictment, but was given five days to respond to the prosecution’s request. Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

16 February 2009: Serbia has more reasons now to be optimistic regarding the arrest of both remaining war crimes fugitives than a few months ago, said Rasim Ljajic, the country’s point man for cooperation with the Hague war crimes court. "It is more likely Serbia will extradite both Goran Hadzic and Mladic than the Netherlands will give up its pressure," Ljajic said in an interview to Serbian daily Blic. The Netherlands, where the U.N. war crimes tribunal is based, has said it will block Serbia’s EU path until all war crime suspects are handed over to The Hague. Bosnian Serb wartime army commander Mladic has been indicted for genocide in the 1992-95 Bosnian war and Hadzic, a Croatian Serb wartime leader, for crimes against humanity committed between 1991 and 1993 period during the war in Croatia. Ljajic could not say how much closer they were to arresting both individuals.

16 February 2009: Trial Chamber III partially approves the amended indictment against Radovan Karadžić. The Prosecution had motioned in September 2008 to amend the indictment by reducing the number of municipalities where Karadžić allegedly committed crimes, removing the charge for complicity in genocide and the charge for breach of the Geneva Convention, and adding three counts of murder. The ICTY granted the reduction in municipalities but denied the request on the three counts of murder. Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

11 February 2009: ICTY indefinitely suspends the trial of Vojislav Šešelj because of fears of witness intimidation. Šešelj is the leader of the Serbian Radical Party and is also charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes for his role in the ethnic cleansing in Serbia between August 1991 and September 1993.

10 February 2009: Bosnia's EU peacekeeping force, supported by NATO and local police, carried out two raids on Tuesdaymorning on homes belonging to relatives of Bosnian Serb wartime commander Ratko Mladic, the most high-profile war crimes suspect from the 1992-95 war still on the run. The operation was carried out in the suburbs of eastern Sarajevo, in the Serb-dominated Bosnian entity of Republika Srpska, where EUFOR troops raided homes of Milica Avram, Mladic’s sister, and Radinka Mladic, his sister-in law, EUFOR said in a statement.

10 February 2009: ICTY orders the provisional release of Bajrush Morina, the aide of the former Kosovo Culture Minister after serving three months in the ICTY Detention Unit. Both the Prosecution and Defense have appealed the release. Morina was convicted of contempt of court by the ICTY on December 17, 2008 and sentenced to three months’ imprisonment for interfering with a witness whose identity was protected by trying to convince his not to testify in the trial against Ramush Haradinaj, a leader of the former Kosovo Liberation Army.

9 February 2009:  ICTY grants early release to Vladimir Santic after giving him credit for time served since October 1997. Santic is a former member of the HVO, the Croation Defense Council, and commanded part of the military police of the HVO.  In January 2000, he was convicted of crimes against humanity for persecuting Bosnian Muslims between October 1992 and April 1993 and was sentenced to 25 years in prison. He appealed the decision and the Appeals Chamber reduced his sentence to 18 years.  He was transferred to Spain to serve out his term in April 2002.

6 February 2009: The United States has for the first time acknowledged Serbia’s efforts to arrest the remaining two war crime fugitives, Ratko Mladic and Goran Hadzic, and hand them over to the United Nations court in The Hague, said Rasim Ljajic, Serbia's point man for cooperation with the Tribunal. After meeting the U.S. Ambassador for war crimes issues Clint Williamson at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington earlier this week, Ljajic said he believed Serbia had "absolute support" for its efforts.

3 February 2009: The trial of Florence Hartmann is postponed until further notice due to a Defense motion calling for the disqualification of two members of the special chamber and of a senior legal officer in charge of the case. The trial was supposed to start on February 5. Hartmann is charged with contempt for allegedly releasing confidential rulings in Slobodan Milosevic case when she was the spokeswoman for the chief ICTY prosecutor.

29 January 2009: Radovan Karadžić requests that the ICTY shorten his indictment to have a quicker trial. Karadžić says that the indictment covers such a wide range of issues that it will take a long time to prepare for the trial and to actually hold the trial. He suggests that the Trial Chamber only allow some of the proposed amendments to the indictment at this time and reserve judgment on the others until after the final judgment.  Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

27 January 2009: ICTY begins trial of Vlastimir Djordjevic, the former the Assistant Minister of Internal Affairs and Head of the Department for Public Safety. He is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes committed through the deportation, murder and racial persecution of Kosovo Albanians in 1999 when he commanded Serb police units in Kosovo.  Djordjevic pled not guilty to the charges. His trial is the last case about crimes in Kosovo to be held at the ICTY.    

22 January 2009: ICTY Trial Chamber charges Vojislav Šešelj with contempt of court for disclosing in a book the names and other information about three witnesses who identities were ordered to be withheld from the public. Šešelj is the leader of the Serbian Radical Party and is also charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes for his role in the ethnic cleansing in Serbia between August 1991 and September 1993.

15 January 2009: Stanislav Galić, a former senior Bosnian Serb army commander, is transferred from the ICTY to Germany to serve his life sentence. In 2003, Galić was convicted of murder, inhumane acts and acts of violence against the people of Sarjevo that he committed from 1992 to 1994, and sentenced to 20 years in prison. In November 2006, the Appeals Chamber changed the sentence to life imprisonment, finding that the Trial Chamber had underestimated the severity of Galić’s acts.

17 December 2008: ICTY Trial Chamber rules that there was not a valid immunity deal between Radovan Karadžić and Richard Holbrooke, former US ambassador to the UN. However, the Chamber requires that the prosecution turn over any notes, agreements, or recordings about the immunity deal to Karadžić. In August 2008, Karadžić alleged that in 1996 Holbrooke promised him immunity on behalf of the UN Security Council if he would give up power.  Karadžić, a former Bosnia Serb political leader, is facing eleven charges of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his part in crimes including the killing of Muslims at Srebrenica in 1995 and the siege of Sarajevo in 1992. 

17 December 2008: Astrit Haraqija, former Kosovo Culture Minister, and Bajrush Morina, his aide, are convicted of contempt of court by the ICTY and are sentenced to five and three months’ imprisonment, respectively. They were found guilty of interfering with a witness whose identity was protected by trying to convince him not to testify in the trial against Ramush Haradinaj, a leader of the former Kosovo Liberation Army.

5 November 2008:  Radovan Karadzic refuses to answer some questions as a witness in the appeals hearing for Momcilo Krajisnik based on the grounds that his testimony could be harmful to his own case. Krajisnik is appealing a 1994 conviction for war crimes related to crimes committed against non-Serbs.

4 November 2008: Judge Patrick Robinson from Jamaica is elected president of the ICTY and Judge O-Gon Kwan from South Korea is elected vice-president. The appointments will become effective on 17 November 2008.

31 October 2008: An ICTY judge schedules a new plea hearing for Florence Hartmann for November 14.

28 October 2008: ICTY Judge Iain Bonomy gives Radovan Karadzic 14 days to respond to the prosecution’s motion to amend the indictment against him. The 14 days will begin when the prosecution provides Karadzic with the material that supports its motion. Karadzic is currently charged with genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.   

27 October 2008: Florence Hartmann declines to enter a plea on two counts of contempt and deferred her plea for 30 days. Hartmann is alleged to have released confidential rulings in Slobodan Milosevic case when she was the spokeswoman for the chief ICTY prosecutor.

8 October 2008: Appeals Chamber reaffirms the Trial Chamber’s judgment against Milan Martić, the former political leader of Croatian Serbs, for sixteen counts of crimes committed against Croats and other non-Serbs in Croatia between 1991 and 1995. Martić’s 35-year prison sentence was also upheld by the Appeals Chamber.  

2 October 2008: The trial of former Chief of General Staff of the Yugoslav Army, Momčilo Perišić, commences. Perišić is the most senior officer of the Yugoslav Army to go on trial for crimes committed during the conflicts in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia. He is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes including murder, inhumane acts and attacks on civilians committed between 1993 and 1995 in Sarajevo, Srebrenica and Zagreb.

24 September 2008: A pre-trial conference in Momcilo Perisic's case is held at ICTY. Perisic was the most senior officer in the Yugoslav army and is charged with crimes against humanity and other crimes. The trial start has been delayed until October 1, 2008.

23 September 2008:  The Trial Chamber of the ICTY grants the Prosecution's motion to join Stojan Zuplijanin's and Mico Stanisic's cases. Zuplijanin was in command of the Regional Security Services Centre of Banja Luka and in that capacity took part in the hostilities against and destruction of the Muslim and Bosnian Croat communities in the Autonomous Region of Krajina. He was arrested and transferred to the ICTY in June 2008 and charged in July with genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

22 September 2008: Prosecutor for the ICTY submits a motion to amend the first amended indictment against Radovan Karadžić. The amended indictment restructures the eleven charges against Karadžić. The genocide count is split into two, one for the 1992 campaign of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and one for the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. However, Karadžić is no longer charged with complicity in genocide nor with breaches of the Geneva Conventions.  The number of municipalities where he allegedly committed crimes is reduced from 41 to 27. The Prosecutor says this will hopefully speed up the trail.  The first amended indictment was filed in 2000.

18 September 2008:  Poland enters into an agreement on enforcement of sentences with the ICTY, which allows for persons convicted before the Tribunal to serve their sentences in its prisons.

17 September 2008: At a pre-trial status conference, Radovan Karadžić claimed that former U.S. diplomat, Richard Holbrooke, promised him immunity from prosecution in return for abdicating his seat as President of Republika Srpska. Karadžić further asserted that Holbrooke was acting on behalf of the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and not only on behalf of the U.S. Judge Bonomy of the Tribunal is consideringKaradžić's assertions to determine if an alleged indemnity deal would influence Karadžić's prosecution.

15 September 2008: Trial Chamber sentences Rasim Delić to three years imprisonment for crimes committed by the El Mujahed Detachment of the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina against captive Bosnian Serb soldiers during the 1992-1995 conflict in the Balkan state.

11 September 2008: Trial Chamber III finds Ljubiša Petković guilty of contempt of the Tribunal and sentences him to four months imprisonment in connection with his failure to comply with a subpoena ordering him to appear as a Chamber witness in the case of Vojislav Šešelj on 13 May 2008.

27 August 2008: Trial Chamber issues an Order in lieu of an indictment against Florence Hartmann, former spokesperson for the Prosecutor of the Tribunal, on two counts of contempt of the Tribunal. Hartmann is alleged to have knowingly disclosed information relating to confidential decisions of the Tribunal’s Appeals Chamber in the case of Slobodan Milošević.

30 July 2008: Radovan Karadžić is transferred to the Tribunal’s custody, after having been at large for more than 13 years.

24 July 2008: Trial Chamber I convicts Kosovo journalist Baton Haxhiu of contempt of the Tribunal and fines him 7,000 euros.

21 July 2008: Radovan Karadžić, the war-time President of Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Herzegovina, is arrested in Serbia. The ICTY first indicted Karadžić in July 1995, and he had been a fugitive from justice for the past 13 years.

17 July 2008: Appeals Chamber issues Judgment in Strugar case, holding the former Yugoslav People’s Army General Pavle Strugar guilty of two additional counts: the crime of devastation not justified by military necessity and the crime of unlawful attacks on civilian objects in Croatia’s coastal town of Dubrovnik in 1991. The Chamber also extended Strugar’s criminal responsibility for his failure to prevent the shelling of the Old Town. However, in consideration of Strugar’s deteriorating health, the Appeals Chamber reduced his sentence to seven and a half years’ imprisonment.

10 July 2008: Trial Chamber II sentences Johan Tarčulovski to 12 years’ imprisonment for crimes committed against ethnic Albanians in village of Ljuboten, Macedonia on 12 August 2001, while acquitting his co-accused, the former Macedonian Interior Minister, Ljube Boškoski, of all charges. The case is the only one relating to the Macedonian conflict heard by the ICTY.

3 July 2008: Appeals Chamber acquits Naser Orić, a former commander of Bosnian Muslim forces in and around Srebrenica, of crimes committed during the 1992-1995 conflict. The Trial Chamber had found that Orić was guilty of failing to take necessary and reasonable measures to prevent the murder and cruel treatment of a number of Bosnian Serbs held in and around the Srebrenica Police Station between 27 December 1992 and 20 March 1993. However, the Appeals Chamber reversed on the grounds that the Trial Chamber failed to make all of the findings necessary to convict a person for command responsibility underhe Tribunal’s Statute.

30 June 2008: Pre-Trial Judge warns Zdravko Tolimir that further obstruction to the proper conduct of proceedings would result in an order being issued for the appointment of defence counsel to represent Tolimir.

21 June 2008: Stojan Župljanin is transferred to the Tribunal’s custody, after evading justice for more than eight years. He was arrested in Serbia on 11 June. Župljanin, the most senior police officer in the so-called Autonomous Region of Krajina (ARK) in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina during the 1992-1995 conflict and later an advisor to Radovan Karadžić, has been charged with involvement in a campaign to eliminate and permanently remove Bosnian Muslims and Bosnian Croats from the area between April and December 1992.

28 May 2008: Trial Chamber III lifts confidentiality from order in lieu of an indictment for contempt of the Tribunal against Ljubiša Petković, who failed to answer a subpoena to appear as a witness in the case against Vojislav Šešelj.

20 May 2008: Trial Chamber I issues order lifting confidentiality of an indictment against Baton Haxhiu, a journalist in Kosovo, who is charged with contempt of the Tribunal in connection with the trial of Ramush Haradinaj and others.

16 May 2008: Appeals Chamber grants Jovica Stanišić’s request to adjourn proceedings due to his health condition for a period of at least three months in the case against him and Franko Simatović.

14 May 2008: Haradin Bala is transferred to France to serve his sentence of 13 years’ imprisonment for crimes committed against Serb and Kosovo Albanian civilians in the Kosovo Liberation Army-run Lapušnik/Llapushnik prison camp between May and July 1998.

9 May 2008: Vinko Martinović is transferred to Italy to serve his sentence of 18 years’ imprisonment for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims in the Mostar area of Bosnia and Herzegovina from April 1993 to January 1994.

25 April 2008: Trial Chamber I issues order lifting the confidentiality of an indictment against Astrit Haraqija and Bajrush Morina, each charged with contempt of the Tribunal based on allegations that they attempted to persuade a witness against testifying in the trial of Ramush Haradinaj and others.

24 April 2008: Mladen Naletilić is transferred to Italy to serve his sentence of 20 years’ imprisonment for crimes committed against Bosnian Muslims in the Mostar area of Bosnia and Herzegovina from April 1993 to January 1994.

22 April 2008: Appeals Chamber issues Judgment in case against Enver Hadžihasanović and Amir Kubura, both former senior officials in the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina convicted as superiors for crimes committed by their subordinates in central Bosnia in 1993. The Appeals Chamber upholds the Trial Chamber’s convictions in part, but also grants the defendants’ appeals in part, reducing their sentences to three years and six months of imprisonment for Hadžihasanović and two years’ imprisonment for Kubura.

9 April 2008: Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović’s trial will start on Monday, 14 April, now that Stanišić is considered to be fit for trial. The trial has been repeatedly delayed due to his ill health, but in consideration of the fact that his co-accused has a right to a “fair and expeditious trial,” the Chamber has set up a video conference for Stanišić to follow the trial should he be unable to attend. 

7 April 2008: Nikola Šainović’s temporary provisional release, granted on 4 April, is modified since his mother died before he left the Detention Unit. The release is modified to allow him to return instead for her funeral. 

7 April 2008: Slovakia enters into an agreement with the Tribunal to enforce its sentences, which will allow persons convicted by the Tribunal to serve their sentences in Slovakia.

4 April 2008: Nikola Šainović is granted temporary provisional release to return to Serbia to visit his sick mother. Šainović was Deputy Prime Minister of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and he is on trial with five others for allegedly participating in a campaign of terror and violence against Kosovo Albanians and other non-Serbs in Kosovo in 1999.

3 April 2008: In the case of Haradinaj et al., the Trial Chamber acquits Ramush Haradinaj and Idriz Balaj of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Kosovo in 1998. The Chamber’s decision is largely based on evidentiary problems in concluding beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused participated in joint criminal enterprise to commit the alleged crimes. Lahi Brahimaj was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment for individual criminal responsibility for cruel treatment and torture of two persons at the Kosovo Liberation Army’s headquarters. 

14 March 2008: The Trial Chamber grants Nebojša Pavković provisional release subject to numerous restrictions on compassionate grounds in order to return to Serbia from 25 March to 2 April. Pavković was a former Commander and Chief of the General Staff in the Yugoslav army, who is on trial with five others for committing crimes against Kosovo Albanians and other non-Serbs.

11 March 2008: The Appeals Chamber overturns last month’s Trial Chamber decision that granted provisional release to the six accused in the Prlić, et al. case. The accused will, therefore, remain in detention during the break in proceedings.  The Appeals Chamber based its decision on the insufficiency of the accused’s justifications for the provisional release. 

10 March 2008: Judge Uldis Ķinis (Latvia) is sworn in as an ad litem judge for the Tribunal, bringing the total number of ad litem judges to sixteen.

7 March 2008: The Trial Chamber postpones the commencement of the trial of Jovica Stanišić and Franko Simatović from 10 March to 17 March at the request of the Prosecution. Stanišić and Simatović, high level officials of the Serbian Secret Service, are accused of organizing and directing the murder, prosecution, and deportation of non-Serbs during the 1992-95 conflict.

5 March 2008: ICTY representatives and spokespersons meet with Croatian media in Zagreb as part of the Tribunal’s Outreach program. The press conference provides an opportunity to inform the media of achievements and upcoming trials of the Tribunal.

4 March 2008: Radoslav Brđanin, a former Serb political leader, is transferred to Denmark to serve his thirty year sentence for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed against non-Serbs during the 1992-95 conflict.

3 March 2008: Three ad litem judges, Pedro R. David (Argentina), Elizabeth Gwaunza (Zimbabwe) and Michele Picard (France), are sworn in before the Tribunal in order to help increase the ICTY’s efficiency.  Two new trials will start this month which will bring the number of concurrent trials to eight, an all-time high.

27 February 2008: Dragan Zelenović, a former Bosnian Serb soldier, is transferred to Belgium to serve his fifteen year sentence for the crimes against humanity of torturing and raping women and girls in the town of Foča in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1992.

20 February 2008: UN Security Council adopts Resolution 1800, authorizing a temporary increase in the number of ad litem judges sitting in cases before the Tribunal, enabling greater efficiency and the commencement of additional trials. The decision means that the number of ad litem judges appointed to the Tribunal may be increased from 12 up to a maximum of 16 during the year 2008.

11 February 2008: Estonia signs enforcement of sentences agreement.

25 January 2008: Vidoje Blagojevic, a former Bosnian Serb Army commander in eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, is transferred to Norway to serve his sentence of 15 years prison sentence for his role in the 1995 Srebrenica genocide. On 17 January 2005, the Trial Chamber sentenced him to 18 years, but the Appeals Chamber reduced that sentence to 15 years on 9 May 2007 after finding that the Trial Chamber had erred in finding Blagojevic guilty of complicity to commit genocide.

23 January 2008: Serbian War Crimes Prosecutor, Vladimir Vukcevic, receives death threats from an unnamed “Serb group” from the United States due to his involvement in pursuing the four remaining war crimes fugitives that have been indicted by the ICTY.

23 January 2008: The ICTY returns four cases involving crimes committed by ethnic Albanian guerillas to the jurisdiction of Macedonian courts. The cases, stemming from the armed conflict in 2001, were initially transferred to the Hague in 2002.