International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia: Chronology

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19 December 2003: In the Kvocka case, Miroslav Kvocka is provisionally released from ICTY detention according to an Appeals Chamber decision issued on December 17.

18 December 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Tribunal makes public the testimony of US General Wesley Clark. The release comes a few days after Clark's testimony under an agreement that allowed the US Government time to review it and redact classified information if necessary. In the parts of the testimony made public, Clark says that Milosevic knew of the impending massacre at Srebrenica but that his only attempt to stop it was to tell Bosnian Serb General Ratko Mladic "not to do this." Clark also established that Milosevic had influence over matters in the Bosnian Serb territory saying that Milosevic insisted that the American peace delegation negotiate with him rather than Radovan Karadzic.

18 December 2003: In the Dragan Nikolic case, the Trial Chamber sentences the accused to 23 years imprisonment. In September, Nikolic pled guilty to four count of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, rape, torture). The Prosecution had recommended a sentence of 15 years, but the Trial Chamber determines that the "brutality, the number of crimes � and the underlying intention to humiliate and degrade" required a harsher sentence.

17 December 2003: In the Blaskic case, the Appeals Chamber hears closing arguments.

17 December 2003: In the Kvocka case, the Appeals Chamber grants Miroslav Kvocka provisional release pending an appeals hearing in his case. Kvocka was convicted of one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and two counts of war crimes (murder) in 2001 and sentenced to seven years in prison. The Appeals Chambers decision comes as Kvocka has already served over 80% of his sentence (including time credited from his initial detention in 1998). He is required to appear before the Tribunal when ordered to by the Appeals Chamber, in preparation for his appeal.

16 December 2003: The trial in the Strugar case begins.

15 December 2003: In the Milosevic case, US General Wesley Clark begins his scheduled 2-day testimony in closed session.

15 December 2003: Judges Christine Van Den Wyngaert (Belgium) and Krister Thelin (Sweden) are sworn in as ad litem judges of the ICTY.

12 December 2003: The Registry imposes communications restrictions on ICTY detainees Slobodan Milosevic and Vojislav Seselj. For the next 30 days the two are banned from receiving visitors or telephone communication, except from legal counsel, diplomatic representatives or members of their immediate family, provided they do not transmit information to the media. The Registry says it has received reports that political statements by both men, who are standing for parliamentary seats in Serbian elections due to be held December 28, have recently been broadcast by the media. The Registrar maintains this undermines the ICTY's mandate to restore and maintain peace in the former Yugoslavia.

12 December 2003: Serbian election officials announce that ICTY defendants may be elected to the Serbian Parliament, but that if they are later convicted and receive prison terms of greater than six months, their mandates will automatically expire. Two ICTY detainees, Slobodan Milosevic and Vojislav Seselj, are candidates in the December 28 election in Serbia. Two other ICTY indictees who are at-large in Serbia, Sreten Lukic and Nebojsa Pavkovic, are also standing in the election.

12 December 2003: In the Strugar case, Pavle Strugar is transferred to Tribunal custody.

10 December 2003: In the Obrenovic case, the Trial Chamber sentences Dragan Obrenovic to 17 years in prison. Obrenovic plead guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in May 2003.

10 December 2003: In the Strugar case, the trial's start is postponed until further notice due to Pavle Strugar's failure to appear before the Tribunal.

8 December 2003: In the Blaskic case, the appeals chamber begins hearing debate on 73 new pieces of evidence that the defense claims prove Tihomir Blaskic is innocent. The Prosecution is countering with new evidence of its own. Last year, the Appeals Chamber accepted 73 new pieces of evidence which was unavailable during the trial. Blaskic was convicted of 18 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in 2000 and sentenced to 45 years in prison.

8 December 2003: Judge Kevin Horace Parker (Australia) is sworn in as a judge at the ICTY.

7 December 2003: In the Strugar case, Belgrade announces it has begun extradition proceedings against indictee Pavle Strugar after a request from the Tribunal, which rejected Strugar's attorney's claim that Strugar is too ill to travel.

5 December 2003: In the Galic case, the Trial Chamber finds Stanislave Galic guilty of four counts of crimes against humanity (2 counts of murder, two counts of inhumane acts) and one count of war crimes (spreading terror). The Chamber dismisses two additional counts of war crimes (attacks on civilians) ruling that these fall within the crime of spreading terror. Galic is sentenced to 20 years in prison.

5 December 2003: In the Jovanovic contempt hearing, Dusko Jovanovic pleads not guilty to charges that he revealed the name of a protected witness.

4 December 2003: In the Miodrag Jokic sentencing hearing, the defendant expresses great remorse for his crimes. In August, Jokic pled guilty to six counts of war crimes (murder; cruel treatment; attacks on civilians; devastation not justified by military necessity; unlawful attacks on civilian objects; destruction or willful damage to institutions dedicated to religion, charity, and education, the arts and sciences, historic monuments and works of art and science). The Prosecution asks for a sentence of 10 years. The Defense suggests a sentence of 2 years imprisonment.

4 December 2003: In the Maglov contempt hearing, Milka Maglov pleads not guilty to contempt charges. Maglov, a former defense attorney in the Brdjanin case, is accused of intimidating a protected witness and releasing the witness' name to a member of the public.

3 December 2003: In the Strugar case, the Trial Chamber is giving Pavle Strugar until December 5 to turn himself in to the ICTY. Strugar, who has been in Seriba on bail since 2001, was requested to return to the Hague earlier this week. His Defense attorney claims Strugar is too ill to travel and has asked for an adjournment, which was denied.

3 December 2003: The ICTY's Victims and Witnesses Section (VWS) holds a conference with health care and welfare officials from Bosnia and Herzegovina, aimed at better meeting the needs of witnesses prior to and following their testimony at the ICTY.

2 December 2003: The trial begins in the Hadzihasanovic and Kubura case. Enver Haszihasanovic is charged with seven counts of war crimes (murder [2 counts]; violence to life or person; cruel treatment; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages, not justified by military necessity; plunder of public or private property; destruction or willful damage done to institutions dedicated to religion). Amir Kubura is charged with six counts of war crimes (murder [2 counts]; violence to life or person; cruel treatment; wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages, not justified by military necessity; plunder of public or private property). The two are the highest ranking Bosnian Muslims to be tried by the Tribunal and are being tried solely on charges of command responsibility, or failing to prevent crimes of their subordinates, most of whom were mujahideen, or foreign Muslim fighters.

2 December 2003: Momir Nikolic is sentenced to 27 years imprisonment. Nikolic pled guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in May. As part of the plea agreement, Nikolic testified in September against his former co-accused in the Blagojevic and Jokic case. The Prosecution had asked for a sentence of 15 to 20 years, but the judges felt that that did not reflect the "totality" of the crime.

1 December 2003: Judge Albert Swart (Netherlands) is sworn in as an ad litem judge at the ICTY.

28 November 2003: ICTY indictee Nebojsa Pavkovic announces he will stand in next month's Parliamentary elections in Serbia. Pavkovic is one of four high-ranking officials indicted last month by the ICTY for crimes allegedly committed in Kosovo. All four refuse to recognize the indictment and Serbia is balking at attempts to extradite them. Pavkovic is the second indictee to announce his candidacy for the Parliamentary elections. Vojislav Seselj, who is in ICTY detention awaiting trial, announced earlier this month that he too will stand in the election.

27 November 2003: In the Hadzihasanovic and Kubura case, Enver Haszihasanovic and Amir Kubura return to Hague detention. The two had been released on bail but were requested to return to the Hague earlier this month in preparation for their trial, which is scheduled to begin December 2.

27 November 2003: In the Krstic case, the Defense team asks the Appeals Chamber to overturn Radislav Kristic's genocide conviction stating that the act he was convicted of did not rise to the level of genocide.

27 November 2003: The sentencing hearing is held in the Cesic case. The Prosecution asks for 13 to 18 years in prison. The Defense suggested 13 years imprisonment. In October, Ranko Cesic pled guilty to six counts of crimes against humanity (5 for murder, 1 for humiliating and degrading treatment) and six counts of war crimes (5 for murder and 1 for rape).

26 November 2003: The Trial Chamber grants a prosecution request to separate proceedings against Pavle Strugar and Vladimir Kovacevic. The Strugar case is scheduled to begin December 9.

26 November 2003: In the Milosevic case, indictee Miroslav Deronjic testifies against Slobodan Milosevic as part of his plea bargain. Deronjic pled guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in September and is awaiting sentencing.

26 November 2003: In the Krstic case, the Appeals hearing begins with the Prosecution claiming that Radislav Krstic's sentence of 27-years in prison for genocide is "manifestly inadequate." In 2001, Krstic became the first person ever convicted of genocide by the ICTY. The Prosecution is asking the Appeals Chamber to sentence him to life in prison.

26 November 2003: In the Babic case, Croatian Serb leader Milan Babic arrives at the Tribunal. Babic's appearance in the Hague was unexpected. He was indicted last week for one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and four counts of war crimes (murder; cruel treatment; wanton destruction of villages not justified by military necessity; and destruction or willful damage done to institutions dedicated to education or religion). Babic is given 30 days to enter a plea.

24 November 2003: The Office of the Prosecutor confirms that it is seeking to join the Milutinovic et al. case with the Pavkovic et al. case, saying that the all seven men in the indictments are accused of virtually the same crimes allegedly committed in the 1998-99 Kosovo conflict. The accused in the Milutinovic et al. case-Milan Milutinovic, Nikola Sainovic, and Dragoljub Ojdanic-are currently in ICTY detention awaiting trial. The accused in the Pavkovic et al. case-Nebojsa Pavkovic, Vladimir Lazarevic, Sreten Lukic, and Vlastimir Djordjevic-are all at large in Serbia. Serbian officials are balking at extraditing the latter four, saying they prefer to try them in Serbia.

24 November 2003: News reports say that the ICTY and ICTR have been forced to borrow $41 million from the UN Peacekeeping budget, creating further problems there. 123 UN member nations are behind on their payments toward the budgets of the ICTY and ICTR, resulting in a $96 million shortage. Diplomats complain that they are frustrated with the slow pace of the Tribunals and their hefty price tag. Each country's full contribution is due by the end of January, 2004.

19 November 2003: Judge Vonimbolana Rasoazanay (Madagascar) is sworn in as an ad litem judge of the ICTY.

19 November 2003: Judge Florence Mumba (Zambia) is sworn in as a judge for the Appeals Chamber of the ICTY and ICTR. She replaces Judge David Hunt (Australia) who left on November 17. Judge Mumba has been a trial judge at the ICTY since 1997.

19 November 2003: The appeals hearing in the Vasiljevic case is held. A judgment will be rendered in due course.

18 November 2003: In the Maglov case, Milka Maglov is ordered to appear before the Trial Chamber on 4 December to enter a plea. Maglov, a former defense attorney in the Brdjanin case, is charged with intimidating a witness and disclosing the witness' name to a member of the public. She was removed from the case in April 2002, when the allegations surfaced.

17 November 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber orders General Wesley Clark to testify on December 15. General Clark, who is currently running for President of the United States, was the NATO Supreme Commander during the organization's 1999 bombing of Serbia. Under Rule 70 of the Tribunal's Rules of Procedure and Evidence, several steps will be taken to ensure that information vital to U.S. national interests will not be made public. These include having portions of the testimony made in private session, the presence of U.S. observers in the court, and a delay in releasing any transcripts or video of the testimony to permit the U.S. Government time to request certain information be redacted.

17 November 2003: The Tribunal confirms the indictment of former Croatian-Serb rebel leader Milan Babic. He is charged with one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) and four counts of war crimes (murder, cruel treatment, wanton destruction of villages or destruction not militarily justified, destruction or willful damage done to educational or religious institutions) related to the persecution of non-Serb populations in a break-away portion of Croatia in 1991-92.

17 November 2003: Judge Theodor Meron (U.S.) and Judge Fausto Pocar (Italy) are re-elected as the President and Vice-President of the ICTY.

14 November 2003: The Tribunal orders the Government of Serbia and Montenegro to hand over personnel files relating to the former Bosnian Serb commander and ICTY fugitive Ratko Mladic. Last summer, the Tribunal ruled that the Prosecution could not demand access to the entire Serbian state archive, but did say it would begin issuing orders for specific files on a case by case basis.

14 November 2003: In the Jovanovic case, the Tribunal orders Dusko Jovanovic to appear and enter a plea on 4 December to the contempt of Tribunal allegations against him. Jovanovic's DAN newspaper printed the name of a protected Tribunal witness in the Milosevic case in August of 2002.

14 November 2003: Judge Kevin Parker (Australia) is appointed as a permanent judge at the ICTY. He will replace outgoing judge David Hunt (Australia) who will be leaving the Tribunal on November 17.

9 November 2003: Nebojsa Pavkovic, the former chief of staff of Yugoslavia's armed forces, says he has no reason to surrender. Pavkovic and three other high-ranking Serbian officials were indicted last month for crimes allegedly carried out in Kosovo.

4 November 2003: Milan Simic is released from ICTY custody in accordance with Judge Meron's Order for Early Release issued last week.

3 November 2003: At the Accused's initial appearance, attorneys for Vladimir Kovacevic, a.k.a. Rambo, argue their client is mentally unfit to enter a plea. The Trial Chamber indicates that it will consider ordering a psychological evaluation and rules that another hearing will be held within 30 days.

3 November 2003: In the Milosevic case, the European Union's former envoy to the Balkans, Lord David Owen, testifies that Slobodan Milosevic had the power to stop the bloodshed two years before the wars ended, but failed to. Owen did concede, however, that Milosevic's influence over the Bosnian Serbs was waning by the time of the Srebrenica massacre in 1995. The massacre is critical to the Prosecution's genocide case against Milosevic.

31 October 2003: During the sentencing hearing in the Obrenovic case, the Prosecution asks for a sentence of 15 to 20 years imprisonment. The Defense suggests an 8 to 12 year sentence. Obrenovic plead guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in May 2003.

31 October 2003: In the Hadzihasonovic and Kubura case, the Trial Chamber pushes back the date the two Accused are ordered to surrender themselves to the custody of the Tribunal. The two must now surrender on November 27. Both men were provisionally released in December 2001. Pre-trial hearings are scheduled to resume November 28.

30 October 2003: The International Community donates 15.6 million Euros toward the establishment of a new War Crimes Chamber in the national Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The amount should cover costs for the first two years of operations. The ICTY and the UN Security Council have expressed support for the War Crimes Chamber, which is anticipated to try cases transferred by the ICTY. The Chamber should be operational toward the end of next year.

29 October 2003: St�phane Bourgon, newly-elected president of the Association of the Defense Counsel for the ICTY (ADC-ICTY), states that the ADC-ICTY is involved in discussions with the Chambers, Prosecutor's Office, and the Registry on the following issues: adopting new qualification requirements for defense counsel, modifying rules concerning the introduction of evidence, developing an electronic disclosure system, and adopting a new legal aid policy for the pre-trial phase.

28 October 2003: At the sentencing hearing in the case of Momir Nikolic, the Accused expresses sorrow for what he has done. Nikolic, who was originally indicted as part of the Blagojevic and Jokic case, plead guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in May 2003. The Prosecution asks for a sentence of 15 to 20 years imprisonment. The Defense asks for a 10 year sentence citing the Accused's remorse and willingness to cooperate with the Prosecution on subsequent cases.

28 October 2003: In the Meakic et al. case, Predrag Banovic is sentenced to 8 years imprisonment. Banovic plead guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution) in June 2003.

27 October 2003: Milan Simic is granted early release, effective 3 November 2003. Simic plead guilty to two counts of torture as a crime against humanity in May 2002 and was sentenced to 5 years imprisonment in October of last year.

27 October 2003: In the Kovacevic case, the Accused's initial appearance before the Tribunal is postponed due to his ill health. Vladimir Kovacevic, a.k.a. Rambo, was transferred to Tribunal Detention last week. His initial appearance has been rescheduled for 3 November.

25 October 2003: The Association of the Defense Counsel for the ICTY (ADC-ICTY) elects its new executive committee: President, St�phane Bourgon (Canada), Vice-President, Branko Lukic (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Vice-President, Stefan Kirsch (Germany), Secretary, Zeljko Par (Croatia), and Treasurer, Mira Tapuskovic (Serbia and Montenegro).

24 October 2003: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte says that the four Serbian officials whose indictments were revealed this week cannot be tried by the new war crimes court in Belgrade. She says that as those most responsible for atrocities, the fall under the ICTY's jurisdiction, not Belgrade's. Serbian officials maintain they will neither arrest nor transfer the four indictees to the Hague at this time. The indictments have sparked outrage among Serbia's politicians and police force.

24 October 2003: Serbia officially opens a special courthouse that will house the trials of some of those who committed atrocities under the Milosevic regime. In the past, the ICTY has said that it plans to transfer some of its lower-priority cases to the Serbian domestic court.

23 October 2003: In the Hadzihasonovic and Kubura case, the Trial Chamber orders the two Accused to surrender themselves to the custody of the Tribunal on November 17. Both men were provisionally released in December 2001. The trial is scheduled to begin December 2.

23 October 2003: Vladimir Kovacevic is transferred to ICTY detention in the Hague. Kovacevic, a.k.a. Rambo, was arrested in Serbia last month after nearly two years as a fugitive from the Tribunal. Kovacevic was indicted as part of the Strugar et al. case, which is currently being heard by the Trial Chamber.

23 October 2003: In the Milosevic case, Ante Markovic, the last Prime Minister of the former federal Yugoslavia, testifies that Milosevic and Franjo Tudjman, the late president of Croatia, drew up plans to split Bosnia in 1991, before the start of the Balkan wars. Ante Markovic says that both leaders ignored his warnings not to start the bloodshed and that Milosevic played an active role in directing the Bosnian Serbs.

23 October 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber orders that Dr. Branko Rakic be assigned as a legal associate to Slobodan Milosevic. Milosevic is currently representing himself in the trial. Doctors say that the stress of case has been having detrimental effects on the Accused's health. The legal associate's role has not yet been clearly defined.

20 October 2003: The Tribunal unseals an indictment charging four Serbian Officials with crimes against humanity and war crimes during Serbia's campaign against Albanian separatists in Kosovo. Former army Chief of Staff Nebojsa Pavkovic, the ex-commander of the army's forces in Pristina Vladimir Lazarevic, former Serbian Director of Public Security Vlastimir Djordjevic, and current Serbian Director of Public Security, Sreten Lukic are all charged with crimes against humanity (murder, inhumane acts, deportation, persecution) and war crimes (murder). Lukic is currently the Serbian official responsible for arresting ICTY fugitive Radko Mladic and handing him over to the Tribunal.

17 October 2003: In the Simic et al. case, all three defendants are found guilty of one count of crime against humanity (persecution). Blagoje Simic is sentenced to 17 years in prison, Miroslave Tadic receives an 8 year sentence, and Simo Zaric is sentenced to 6 years imprisonment. In a dissenting opinion, Judge Lindholm says Simic should only have received a sentence of 7 years and that Tadic and Zaric should have been acquitted.

15 October 2003: The Prosecution's spokeswoman announces SFOR has conducted a search operation in the Republika Srpska to seize documents that the authorities failed to provide to the Office of the Prosecutor upon prior requests.

15 October 2003: In the Brdjanin case, the defense begins its case.

9 October 2003: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte tells the UN Security Council that she anticipates completing all investigations by the 2004 deadline set by the Council. She says that her office is working on 13 remaining investigations concerning some 30 individuals. Further indictments are expected. Del Ponte also reiterates her claim that several Balkan governments, such as Serbia and Montenegro, Croatia, and the Serb and Croat factions in Bosnia are not doing enough to capture fugitives from the Tribunal. She expresses her fear that the approaching deadline for finishing investigations may encourage these governments to create further obstacles to cooperation with the Tribunal.

9 October 2003: ICTY President Judge Theodor Meron presents his annual report to the UN Security Council. He tells the Council that the 2008 deadline for finishing all Trials at the ICTY is doable provided no new indictments are handed down and all current fugitives are turned over to the Tribunal immediately. However, he reports that the Prosecution expects to issue more indictments. He warns the Council that "strict application of the target dates for the completion strategy must not result in impunity" for accused war criminals.

9 October 2003: The US confirms that it is offering a $5 million reward for the capture of Ante Gotovina, the ICTY's third most-wanted fugitive. Last year, the US announced similar rewards for the top-two most wanted fugitives, Radovan Karadzic and Ratko Mladic.

8 October 2003: The attorney for fugitive Ante Gotovina requests that the UN Security Council initiate an investigation into misconduct by ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte. He says del Ponte refuses to withdraw charges against Gotovina the she knows to be false. He claims two of the people Gotovina is charged with murdering are actually alive.

8 October 2003: Ranko Cesic pleads guilty to 6 counts of war crimes (5 for murder, 1 for humiliating and degrading treatment) and 6 counts of crimes against humanity (5 for murder, 1 for rape). The prosecution is asking for a sentence of between 13 and 18 years. No date has yet been set for sentencing.

7 October 2003: The Milosevic case resumes following a two week recess due to the accused's ill health. The Trial Chamber says it is considering assigning counsel to assist Slobodan Milosevic, who is defending himself. Doctors say the strain of trial is contributing to his poor health.

3 October 2003: A lawyer for fugitive Ante Gotovina send a letter to the Tribunal requesting that the indictment against his client be withdrawn due to factual omissions. The attorney claims the Prosecution knew that two of the 150 persons Gotovina is charged with killing were indeed alive. According to the lawyer, if the indictment is withdrawn, Gotovina will avail himself for questioning by the Prosecutor regarding other charges.

2 October 2003: The Strugar et al. case, which was supposed to resume on 9 October 2003, has been adjourned again for unspecified reasons. A new date has not yet been set.

1 October 2003: Jean-Claude Antonetti (France) is sworn in as Judge of the ICTY. Judge Antonetti replaces Judge Claude Jorda (France) who resigned to take up his duties as a judge at the International Criminal Court. Judge Antonetti will serve the remainder of Judge Jorda's mandate, which expires 16 November 2005. In addition, Judge Schomburg is assigned to the Appeals Chamber.

30 September 2003: Judges in the Milosevic case agree to scale back hearings to only three days a week. The move comes after doctors say Milosevic's high blood pressure could pose a serious risk to his health and that stress was making the matter worse. Hearings in the case are currently on hold as the Accused recuperates from his latest bout of ill health.

30 September 2003: In the Deronjic case, the Accused pleads guilty to one count of crimes against humanity (persecution), a plea accepted by the Trial Chamber. The prosecution recommends that Miroslav Deronjic be sentenced to 10 years imprisonment. The Defense is asking for no more than 6 years. The judges have not set a date for their sentencing decision.

26 September 2003: In the Vasiljevic case, Judge Schomburg is assigned to replace Judge Jorda.

26 September 2003: In the Hadzihasanovic et al. case, the Tribunal receives the Prosecution's Third Amended Indictment, charging the Accused with violations of the laws or customs of war.

25 September 2003: In the Milosevic case, hearings are canceled through 3 October 2003 due to the Accused's poor health. The Prosecution requests a special hearing on the delay, arguing that continued delays may result in the unavailability of witnesses scheduled to appear. The Prosecution is requesting changes to the ICTY rules to deal with the issue. This is the ninth time-totaling more than 60 days-that the trial has been adjourned due to Milosevic's ill health.

24 September 2003: Serbia's Justice Minister announces that the Prosecution at the ICTY is prepared to transfer two or three cases to Belgrade for trial in the Serbian courts. His comments follow a meeting with Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte. Serbia recently passed new laws making way for domestic prosecution of war criminals.

22 September 2003: In the Milosevic case, hearings are canceled for the entire week due to Slobodan Milosevic's poor health.

19 September 2003: In the Blagojevic and Jokic case, former co-Accused Momir Nikolic begins testimony. He is expected to be on the stand for the next week. Nikolic plead guilty on 7 May 2003.

17 September 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Court orders a three month adjournment upon completion of the Prosecution case so that the Defendant can prepare his case. This is far short of the two-year adjournment Milosevic had sought.

17 September 2003: In the Strugar et al. case, the Court orders the suspension of Pavle Strugar's provisional release as of 6 October 2003.

17 September 2003: The Appeals Chamber issues its judgment in the Krnojelac case, expanding the culpability of the Accused and increasing his sentence to 15 years imprisonment. The Appeals Chamber reverses the acquittal of the Accused with respect to two counts of crimes against humanity (torture and murders) and two counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (torture and murder). The Appeals Chamber also upholds the Trial Chamber convictions of two counts of crimes against humanity (persecution and inhumane acts) and two counts of violating the laws and customs of war (cruel treatment) but finds that Milorad Krnojelac's criminal responsibility rises to the level of co-perpetrator, rather than accomplice, as the Trial Chamber had held.

16 September 2003: In the Rasevic case, Judge Janu enters a "not guilty" plea on Mitar Rasevic's behalf after the Accused declines to enter a plea at his second appearance. Under Tribunal rules, a defendant has 30 days from his/her initial appearance before the Tribunal to enter a plea or else have a default "not guilty" plea entered on his/her behalf.

12 September 2003: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte expresses her disappointment with the UN Security Council's decision to split the post of Chief Prosecutor for the ICTY and ICTR. However, she pledges her cooperation with the newly appointed ICTR Chief Prosecutor Hassan Bubacar Jallow. Del Ponte also outlines the three main goals of the OTP: to complete all investigations by 2004, to ensure the surrender of all remaining fugitives, and to finalize all trails by 2008 and all appeals by 2010. There are outstanding arrests on 11 indictments, involving 17 people.

9 September 2003: The Milosevic case resumes.

7 September 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Prosecution expresses regret that Montenegrin Premier Milo Djukanovic has refused to testify. The Prosecution has not yet decided whether it will ask the court to subpoena him.

4 September 2003: The Milosevic case is adjourned due to the Accused's poor health. The judges ordered a full medical and psychological report.

4 September 2003: In the Dragon Nikolic case, the Accused pleads guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, rape, torture). The Prosecution is asking for a 15-year sentence. The Defense will make its sentencing request at a later date. Details of the plea agreement have not been released.

4 September 2003: The UN Security Council passes resolution 1504 re-appointing Carla del Ponte as Chief Prosecutor for the ICTY for the next 4 years. Del Ponte's second term begins on September 14, 2003.

3 September 2003: Both sides in the Stakic case announce they will appeal the trial judgment. The Prosecution is asking that Stakic's acquittal for genocide be reversed.

3 September 2003: In the Meakic et al. case, the Prosecution and the Defense jointly propose a sentence of eight years in prison for Predrag Banovic. Banovic plead guilty to persecution as a crime against humanity in June 2003.

2 September 2003: In the Milosevic case, the court denies the Accused's request for a two year release. Milosevic, who is defending himself, argued that was the minimum amount of time he would need to prepare his defense.

29 August 2003: In the Stugar et al. case, the Tribunal grants Miodrag Jokic's request for continued provisional release. The Tribunal acknowledges "extraordinary health and family considerations, amounting to exceptional circumstances" in granting the continued provisional release. Jokic has been on provisional release since 20 February 2002. Earlier this week he pleaded guilty to six counts of war crimes.

27 August 2003: In the Stugar et al. case, Miodrag Jokic pleads guilty to six counts of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder; cruel treatment; attacks on civilians; devastation not justified by military necessity; unlawful attacks on civilian objects; destruction or willful damage institutions dedicated to religion, charity, education, historic monuments, etc.) The Prosecution asks for a sentence of 10 years in prison. The Defense will make a sentence request at a later date.

18 August 2003: Mitar Rasevic declines to enter a plea at his initial appearance before the Tribunal. Rasevic is charged with seven counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, torture, inhumane acts, murder, imprisonment, enslavement), five counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (torture, cruel treatment, murder, slavery), and six counts of violations of the Geneva Conventions (torture, willfully causing serious injury, willful killing, unlawful confinement of a civilian, willfully causing great suffering, inhumane treatment). Rasevic has 30 days to enter a plea. If he does not, the Tribunal will enter a plea of not guilty on his behalf.

15 August 2003: Mitar Rasevic is transferred to ICTY detention in the Hague.

9 August 2003: Indictee Mitar Rasevic surrenders to officials in Belgrade, Serbia-Montenegro. Rasevic faces charges of crimes against humanity, war crimes, and violations of the Geneva Conventions.

1 August 2003: The Tribunal begins its summer recess. Cases will resume 25 August 2003.

1 August 2003: Former Bosnian Serb Prime Minister Milorad Dodik, who earlier refused to testify, testifies in the Brdjanin case.

31 July 2003: In the Stakic case, the Tribunal hands down its first-ever life sentence. The Trial Chamber convicts Milomir Stakic of four counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, extermination, murder, and deportation) and one count of violations of the laws and customs of war (murder). He was found not guilty on the charges of genocide and complicity to commit genocide.

29 July 2003: UN officials say Secretary-General Kofi Annan has sent a letter to the Security Council requesting that it renew Carla del Ponte's term as Chief Prosecutor at the ICTY for another four years. The letter also asks the Council to divide the post of Chief Prosecutor of the ICTY and ICTR, and to name a new prosecutor for the ICTR..

29 July 2003: In the Milosevic case, all hearings are cancelled for the rest of the week due to the Accused's ill health. The case will resume on 25 August 2003.

28 July 2003: In the Milosevic case, the trial is adjourned for the day due to the Accused's ill health.

24 July 2003: In the Mrdja case, the Tribunal accepts a plea agreement in which defendant Darko Mrdja pleads guilty to one count of murder as a violation of the laws or customs of war and one count of crimes against humanity (for inhumane acts). In the agreement, the Prosecution withdraws a charge of crimes against humanity (for extermination). The Prosecution recommends a sentence of between 15 to 20 years.

22 July 2003: The president of Serbia and Montenegro, Svetozar Marovic, says that his country will join NATO in the effort to track down ICTY fugitive Ratko Mladic. Marovic says he does not believe that Mladic is in Serbia and Montenegro but that his government will work with the alliance in tracking him down.

18 July 2003: Per ICTY President Judge Meron's order of 9 July 2003, Zdravko Mucic is released from Tribunal detention.

17 July 2003: During the 28th Plenary Session of the ICTY, Judges adopted amendments to the Tribunal's Rules of Procedure and Evidence allowing ad litem judges to preside over initial appearances and status conferences, and to act as Pre-Trial Judges.

17 July 2003: In the Brdjanin case, the Trial Chamber issues a subpoena requiring former Republika Srpska Prime Minister Milorad Dodik to testify. The order requires Dodik to appear before the Tribunal on 31 July 2003.

16 July 2003: In the Milosevic case, Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte says that the prosecution will shift its focus in the coming months to proving the genocide charges against the former Yugoslav president. In the Tribunal's 10-year existence, it has only convicted one person of genocide.

16 July 2003: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte says the she expects to hand down the last indictments against war crimes suspects in the former Yugoslavia and conclude all investigations by the end of next year.

11 July 2003: In the Blagojevic et al. case, Vidoje Blogojevic expresses his intention to appeal the Trial Chamber's decision preventing him from dismissing his defense counsel. Blagojevic says he's "lost all hope" in the abilities of his defense team. The Prosecution requests that the trial be suspended while the Tribunal considers the request

10 July 2003: Veselin Sljivancanin pleads not guilty to two counts of crimes against humanity (murder, inhumane acts), two counts of war crimes (murder, cruel treatment), and two counts of grave breaches to the Geneva Convention (willful murder, willfully causing great suffering).

9 July 2003: In the Celebici case, Hazim Delic and Esad Landzo are transferred to Finland to serve sentences of 18 and 15 years respectively.

9 July 2003: In the Celebici case, Tribunal president, Judge Theodor Meron, granted Zdravko Mucic early release, effective 18 July. Mucic's original sentence was increased from 7 to 9 years imprisonment on 8 April 2003 by the Appeals Chamber. Judge Meron determined that since those serving time in the prison of a Signatory State were eligible for early release after serving two-thirds of their sentence, the same should be true of Mucic, who had been in Tribunal detention since 9 April 1996.

7 July 2003: Zeljko Meakic pleads not guilty to three counts of crimes against humanity (persecution, murder, inhumane acts) and two counts of violations of the laws or customs of war (murder and cruel treatment).

4 July 2003: Zeljko Meakic is transferred to the ICTY detention Unit.

4 July 2003: In the Simic et al. case, closing arguments wrap up. The Prosecution recommends a sentence of 20 to 25 years' imprisonment for Blagoje Simic, 15 to 20 years for Miroslav Radic, and 10 to 15 years for Simo Zaric.

3 July 2003: Veselin Sljivancanin has his initial appearance before the Tribunal but does not enter a plea due to problems with the appointment of counsel. Another appearance is scheduled for 10 July.

2 July 2003: The Serbian Defense Council agrees to allow prosecutors in the Milosevic case access to classified minutes of council meetings that Milosevic held between 1991 and 2000, while President of Serbia.

1 July 2003: Veselin Sljivancanin is transferred to the ICTY detention Unit.

30 June 2003: Zeljko Meakic surrenders to Serbian Police. Meakic has been a fugitive from the ICTY since his indictment in 1995.

28 June 2003: Serbian Justice Minister Vladan Batic calls on Ratko Mladic and other fugitive indictees to turn themselves in to the Tribunal. Batic says they should do this to avoid "the entire [Serbian] nation being labeled as genocidal." The Tribunal and other international observers have regularly accused Serbia of giving these fugitives freedom of movement within their borders.

27 June 2003: Ivica Rajic pleads not guilty to war crimes, including willful killing and wanton destruction.

27 June 2003: Bilijana Plavsic, the former Bosnian Serb President who pled guilty to crimes against humanity February, is transferred to Sweden to server her 11-year prison sentence.

26 June 2003: In the Fustar et. al. case, Predrag Banovic pleads guilty to one count of persecution as a crime against humanity in exchange for the Court's dismissal of the remaining charges against him.

25 June 2003: In the Milosevic case, former Balkans peace negotiator and former U.S. Ambassador to Croatia, Peter Galbraith, testifies that Milosevic wielded great power over Croat-Serbian forces in the 1990s. He says leaders of the breakaway Krajina Serb Republic (RSK) deferred to the former Serbian leader and that Milosevic was behind the group's rejection of a peace plan in January of 1995.

24 June 2003: Former Bosnian Croat militia leader Ivica Rajic is transferred to the ICTY detention Unit. Rajic was arrested in Croatia in April of this year.

20 June 2003: The Trial Chamber denies a request by the Prosecution that the Government of Serbia-Montenegro allow prosecutors open access to state archives. The Court ruled that the Prosecution must specifically identify the documents and information it wants from the Serbian Government.

20 June 2003: The Brdjanin and Blaskic cases resume following assurances by the US Treasury Department that American attorneys may continue to represent defendants at the ICTY without fear of prosecution.

19 June 2003: Prosecutors in the Milosevic case introduce a document that purportedly links Serbian forces to the massacre at Srebrenica. The order from the Bosnian Serb Interior Minister instructs special police units, including the Serbian secret police, to move into Srebrenica days before the massacre. It's the first piece of direct evidence that shows Serbian police were in the town.

19 June 2003: The Brdjanin case is adjourned after the two American attorneys on the case say they must withdraw. This is the second trial to be put on hold because of the US ban on services, including legal representation, to persons from the former Yugoslavia blacklisted by the US government. A Tribunal spokesman says that the Tribunal is in contact with US officials and hopes to have the matter resolved quickly.

18 June 2003: The Blaskic case is adjourned after the accused's American attorney says he must withdraw from the case or face prosecution in the US. This follows an executive order issued by US President George Bush aimed at cutting off support to hundreds of blacklisted people from the former Yugoslavia. US Treasury Department officials maintain that the order bans all support, including legal services. About 20 American attorneys are defending suspects at the ICTY.

18 June 2003: In the Milosevic case, former Yugoslav president Zoran Lilic testifies that Slobodan Milosevic never responded to his urgings to end the crackdown on Albanians in Kosovo in 1999. Lilic maintains, however, that Milosevic had nothing to do with the massacre in Srebrenica, noting that Milosevic had called the event "truly tragic."

17 June 2003: Judge In�s M�nica Weinberg de Roca of Argentina is sworn in as a Judge of the Appeals Chamber of the ICTY and ICTR.

13 June 2003: At his initial appearance, indictee Jovica Stanisic pleads not guilty to four counts of crimes against humanity and one count of war crimes.

13 June 2003: ICTY President Judge Theodor Meron expresses his strong support for the establishment of a Special War Crimes Chamber of the State Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Chamber would serve to prosecute lower-level accused in Bosnia rather than in the Hague.

13 June 2003: Serbian Police arrest the third member of the “Vukovar-three” following a 10-hour standoff in Belgrade. Veselin Sljivancanin is taken into custody following clashes with several hundred supporters outside of his apartment in Belgrade. Sljivancanin’s co-accused, Mile Mrksic and Miroslav Radic, are already in detention in the Hague awaiting trial.

12 June 2003: Croatian President Stjepan Mesic writes ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte, requesting that she amend or withdraw the indictment against Ante Gotovina. Mesic claims that there is new information that casts doubt on Gotovina’s guilt. Ms. del Ponte says that Gotovina should turn himself in and that the new information would be considered by the trial chamber assigned to his case once the accused is in ICTY custody.

11 June 2003: Indictee Jovica Stanisic arrives in the Hague. Stanisic was indicted in March 2003 and later arrested in Serbia. His extradition was delayed while he underwent colon surgery.

10 June 2003: After two years in hiding, ICTY fugitive Ante Gotovina says he will talk with ICTY representatives and surrender to the Tribunal if he cannot persuade investigators of his innocence.

5 June 2003: In the Milosevic case, Presiding Judge Richard May orders Serbia-Montenegro to submit transcripts from meetings Slobodan Milosevic had with senior allies. The order gives the Belgrade Government one month to turn over all transcripts from meetings of the Supreme Defense Council between 1999 and 2000.

2 June 2003: Indictee Franko Simatovic appears for the first time before the ICTY. He pleads not guilty to the war crime of murder and the crimes against humanity of murder, persecution, deportation and inhumane acts.

30 May 2003: Serbian officials extradite Franko Simatovic to the Hague. Co-indictee Jovica Stanisic’s lawyer announces that Mr. Stanisic will turn himself over to the Hague as soon as his health permits.

29 May 2003: Momir Talic, Chief of General Staff of the Bosnian Serb Republic Army during the 1992-95 Bosnian conflict, dies of lung cancer in Belgrade. Talic was conditionally released from ICTY custody in September 2002 due to poor health. The case against his co-accused, Radoslav Brdjanin, continues.

29 May 2003: Goran Jelisic is transferred to Italy to serve out a 40-year prison term.

29 May 2003: The Milosevic trial resumes following a two-day break due to Mr. Milosevic’s poor health.

27 May 2003: The Milosevic trial is adjourned due to the ill health of the accused. This marks the eighth time the trial has been interrupted due to Mr. Milosevic’s poor health.

26 May 2003: Former Serbian state security chief Jovica Stanisic, who was indicted earlier this month and due to be transferred to the Hague, is hospitalized in Serbia because of deteriorating health.

26 May 2003: Serbian police detain 23 people in connection with a massacre in Croatia in 1991. ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte reportedly turns over files to Serbian officials relating to the massacre. If any of the detainees are brought to trial, it would mark the first major war crimes trials in Serbia since the Balkan wars began.

25 May 2003: ICTY marks its tenth anniversary. The ICTY was created on 25 May 1993 following the unanimous approval of UN Security Counsel Resolution 827.

21 May 2003: At his initial appearance, Miroslav Radic pleads not guilty to all charges.

21 May 2003: Dusko Jovanovic, editor-in-chief of the Serbian newspaper “Dan”, is served with an ICTY indictment accusing him of revealing the identity of a protected witness in the Milosevic case, possibly putting the witness’s life in jeopardy. Jovanovic says he intends to turn himself over to the Tribunal.

21 May 2003: Dragan Obrenovic, one of the accused in the Blagojevic et al. case, pleads guilty to one count of persecution on political, racial, and religious grounds as a crime against humanity. Former co-accused Momir Nikolic pled guilty on 7 May. Both are expected to testify against the two remaining accused. No date has yet been set for Obrenovic’s sentencing.

21 May 2003: Former Slovene President Milan Kucan testifies in the Milosevic trial. He says that Milosevic had intentions of creating a Greater Serbia as early as 1989. Kucan is the second leader of a former Yugoslav republic to testify against Mr. Milosevic. Croatian President Stipe Mesic has also previously given testimony.

20 May 2003: In the Milosevic case, The Tribunal agrees to give the Prosecution an extra 100 days to complete its case against the accused.

20 May 2003: Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte praises a new level of cooperation between the ICTY and the Serbian Government. Serbia has agreed to intensify efforts to extradite ICTY indictees within its boarders and to allow the prosecutor free access to its archive materials, which may be used in preparing cases. Del Ponte also calls on the Tribunal’s most wanted fugitive, Radovan Karadzic, to surrender immediately. She warns that this is his last chance to surrender voluntarily, noting NATO forces are poised for “an imminent arrest.” Karadzic is believed to be hiding in Bosnia. Del Ponte also says that preparations are underway to create a war crimes chamber within the Bosnian judicial system to try some of the remaining ICTY cases.

19 May 2003: The UN Security Council amends the rules of the ICTY to allow ad litem judges to oversee pre-trial matters in other cases during the period of their appointment to a particular trial.

17 May 2003: Miroslav Radic, a former Yugoslav army officer accused of war crimes in the Croatian town of Vukovar in 1991, is transferred to the ICTY.

14 May 2003: Proceedings begin in the Krnojelac appeals case.

14 May 2003: The trial of Vidoje Blagojevic, Dragan Obrenovic, and Dragan Jokic (Blagojevic et al.) begins. The three former Bosnian Serb army commanders are on trial for taking part in the 1995 massacre at Srebrenica. Blagojevic and Obrenovic are charged with complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity. Jokic is charged with crimes against humanity. A fourth man accused in the case, Momir Nikolic, pled guilty to crimes against humanity on 7 May. He is expected to testify against his former co-defendants.

12 May 2003: Above the objections of the Accused, the Court orders that standby counsel be appointed in the Siselj case. The Court ruled that the right to represent oneself is not absolute, especially in light of Siselj’s “declared intention to attempt to use the Tribunal as a vehicle for the furtherance of his political beliefs and aspirations.” The Court has not imposed counsel, but reserves that right if needed at a later stage.

9 May 2003: A Belgrade district court rules that Jovica Stanisic and Franko Simatovic, two of Milosevic’s top security officials, can be extradited to the ICTY.

8 May 2003: The ICTY postpones the trial of Momcilo Krajisnik, which was scheduled to start on 12 May 2003, as a result of the Tribunal’s withdrawal of Krajisnik’s chief defense attorney, Deyan Ranko Brashich, who was temporarily suspended from the New York State Bar. Krajisnik is charged with 2 counts of genocide, 5 counts of crimes against humanity and 1 count of violations of the laws and customs of war.

8 May 2003: Prosecutors in the Milosevic trial ask the Court for at least six more months to complete their case. The Prosecution is scheduled to finish its case this month, but claims that recurring interruptions in the trial due to Milosevic’s ill health have made that impossible. The Court is considering the request, which, if granted, could mean that the defense would not begin until 2004.

8 May 2003: The trial of Stanislav Galic, who is charged with 4 counts of crimes against humanity and 3 counts of violations of the laws and customs of war, ends. The Prosecution requests a sentence of life imprisonment. No date has been set for the verdict.

7 May 2003: The Court accepts an amended guilty plea by Momir Nikolic and dismisses the remaining charges “without prejudice.” Nikolic pleads guilty to one count of persecution on political, religious and racial grounds as a crime against humanity. In exchange, the Prosecution will recommend a sentence of between 15 and 20 years imprisonment. A sentencing hearing will be held in two to four months.

6 May 2003: Momir Nikolic (one of the Accused in Blagojevic et al.) pleads guilty to crimes against humanity. The Court, however, declined to accept the plea agreement between Nikolic and the Office of the Prosecutor.

6 May 2003: The start of the Blagojevic et al. case is postponed until 14 May 2003.

1 May 2003: The ICTY confirms the indictment against Jovica Stanisic and Franko Simatovic, two of Milosevic’s security chiefs who are accused of crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war. The Tribunal requests Serbia’s cooperation in extraditing the two to the Hague.

2 May 2003: Judge Joaquín Martín Canivell (Spain) is sworn in as an ad litem Judge of the ICTY.

30 April 2003: A Croatian court authorizes the extradition of indictee Ivica Rajic to the ICTY.

29 April 2003: Indictee Janko Bobetko, the most senior Croatian official indicted by the ICTY, dies at his home after heart and respiratory failure.

28 April 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Prosecution presents evidence allegedly linking the accused to the crimes he is accused of instigating.

17 April 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Prosecution files an official request for additional time to present its case in chief.

17 April 2003: Closing arguments end in the Stakic case.

15 April 2003: At his initial appearance, Naser Oric pleads not guilty to 6 counts of violations of the laws or customs of war, including murder, cruel treatment and wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages in 1992-93.

14 April 2003: The parliament of Serbia and Montenegro amends a law, enabling war crimes suspects indicted after April 2002 to be extradited to the ICTY.

11 April 2003: Croatian authorities confirm the delivery of the ICTY indictment against Janko Bobetko.

11 April 2003: Closing arguments begin in the Stakic case.

10 April 2003: Naser Oric, a Muslim commander indicted by the ICTY for violations of the laws or customs of war, is detained in the Bosnian city of Tuzla and transferred to the ICTY.

8 April 2003: In the Celebici case, the ICTY Appeals Chamber dismisses the appeals and confirms the sentences of Zdravko Mucic, Hazim Delic and Esad Landzo. The accused were convicted for killing, torturing, sexually assaulting, beating and otherwise subjecting to cruel and inhumane treatment detainees at the Celebici camp in Bosnia and Herzegovina and sentenced to nine, eighteen and fifteen years imprisonment, respectively.

7 April 2003: The ICTY confirms an indictment against journalist Dusko Jovanovic for contempt of court after he allegedly revealed the identity of a protected witness in the trial of Slobodan Milosevic.

5 April 2003: Ivica Rajic, the wartime commander of a Bosnian Croat militia, is detained in Zagreb on an arrest warrant issued by the ICTY. Rajic, who was indicted in September of 1995, is accused of willfully killing Muslim civilians in central Bosnia in 1993.

4 April 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber denies the prosecution’s motion to impose counsel on the accused.

4 April 2003: In his second initial appearance, Radovan Stankovic refuses to plead to the eight counts of crimes against humanity and war crimes with which he is charged, prompting Judge Amin El Mahdi to enter not guilty pleas on his behalf.

2 April 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Prosecution advises the Trial Chamber that it intends to seek an extension of time to present its case against the accused. Thus far, the trial has been delayed for a total of 54 days due to ill health of the accused.

31 March 2003: In the Naletilic and Martinovic case, the Trial Chamber finds Mladen Naletelic and Vinko Martinovic guilty of crimes against humanity, violations of the laws or customs of war and breaches of the Geneva Conventions and sentences them to 20 and 18 years of imprisonment, respectively.

27 March 2003: Former Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic, agrees to take additional medication to lower his blood pressure and the Milosevic trial is scheduled to resume March 31, 2003.

25 March 2003: The Milosevic trial is adjourned again due to ill health of the accused. Cross-examination of General Nojko Marinovic, former commander of Dubrovnik, is delayed as a result.

25 March 2003: Vojislav Seselj pleads not guilty to 14 charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

24 March 2003: In the Naletilic and Martinovic case, the Trial Chamber dismisses a motion by Defense counsel to stay deliberations in light of new evidence disclosed by the Prosecution. Judgment, which was scheduled to be rendered this day, is rescheduled for March 31, 2003.

19 March 2003: Judge Carmel Agius issues order requiring Croatian authorities to serve Indictment against Janko Bobetko and suspending arrest warrants and orders for surrender upon service of the Indictment. Judge Agius also orders Croatian authorities to provide the Tribunal with monthly updates regarding Bobetko’s medical condition.

18 March 2003: The Milosevic trial is adjourned due to ill health of the accused.

13 March 2003: President of the ICTY, Judge Theodor Meron, issues a statement expressing shock and dismay at the assassination of Serbian Prime Minister, Zoran Djindjic, who played a key role in the arrest and transfer of Slobodan Milosevic to the ICTY in June 2001.

11 March 2003: Judge Theordor Meron takes up office as President of the ICTY.

10 March 2003: The Brdjanin case is adjourned until April 14, 2003.

10 March 2003: In the Milosevic case, the Trial Chamber declines to order Serbia-Montenegro to produce documents.

5 March 2003: During his initial appearance, a day after his transfer from Slovenia to the ICTY Detention Unit, Fatmir Limaj pleads not guilty to the 9 counts with which he is charged, including crimes against humanity and violations of the laws or customs of war.

27 Feburary 2003: Judge Theordor Meron (United States) is elected President of the ICTY. Judge Fausto Pocar (Italy) is elected Vice-President and assumes his duties immediately.

27 February 2003: Trial Chambers sentences Biljana Plavsic, former Bosnian Serb President, to 11 years imprisonment.