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Fall 2011
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Environmental Law (LAW-629-001)
Breen

Meets: 07:30 PM - 10:10 PM (M) - Room 101

Enrolled: 50 / Limit: 60


Notices

Our first class meets on Monday, August 22, 2011, from 7:30 pm to 10:10 pm. As the time gets closer, check the law school’s web site for a final room assignment.

Description

N/A. Please contact the instructor for further information.

Textbooks and Other Materials

The textbook information on this page was provided by the instructor. Students should use this information when considering purchases from the AU Campus Store or other vendors. Students may check here to determine if books are currently available for purchase at the AU Campus Store.

There are three sets of required reading materials:

  1. The casebook, Glicksman et al., Environmental Protection: Law and Policy (5th ed., 2007). Used casebooks are okay, but be careful not to buy the old 4th edition from several years ago.
  2. The statutory supplement, Selected Environmental Law Statutes (West Publishing Co.). The 2010-2011 edition will be easiest to use, but any edition from 2002-2003 onward has everything you’ll need, just with slightly different page numbers.
  3. The photocopied materials available for this class from the law school. You can purchase these materials in room 465.

    First Class Readings

    Bring at least the casebook (#1) and the statutory supplement (#2) to our first class on August 23. If you are not able to pick up the photocopied materials (#3) in time to read them before class, not to worry – the course website will have a pdf of the first class’s necessary pages posted online. Get the materials in plenty of time for subsequent class’s readings.

    The reading assignment for the first class is:

    1. Carefully read casebook pages 463-468, 187-188, and 1040-1043.
    2. Quickly read casebook pages 59-72.
    3. Quickly read the supplemental materials at the front of the set of photocopied materials, up to and including the Supreme Court’s syllabus in United States v. Mead.