Webcasts

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April 16, 2010 - 9:00 AM EDT

Seventh Annual IP/Gender: Mapping the Connections, Gender and Invention
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November 19, 2009 - 4:30 PM EST

Patentable Subject Matter After the Bilski Oral Argument
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November 5, 2009 - 1:00 PM EST

Beyond TRIPS: The Current Push for Greater International Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights
Strengthening IP Enforcement Through TRIPS and Other Multilateral Initiatives
American Efforts to Strengthen International IP Enforcement


October 20, 2009 - 6:00 EDT

Fifth Annual Finnegan Distinguished Lecture on Intellectual Property - What the Federal Circuit Can Learn from the Supreme Court--and Vice Versa
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October 16, 2009 - 12:30 EDT

Legal Strategies to Improve Access to Affordable Pharmaceuticals
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September 21, 2009 - 12:30 EDT

Copyright from an International Perspective
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April 24, 2009 - 09:00 EDT

Sixth Annual IP/Gender: Mapping the Connections
Female Fan Culture and Intellectual Property

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February 19, 2009 - 19:00 EST

Achieving Innovation + Access in Global Pharmaceutical Markets
A Discussion with Professor John Barton
Stanford University School of Law

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January 21, 2009

Chief Judge Paul Michel
Patentable Subject Matter After The Bilski Decision

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October 21, 2008

Professor Daniel J. Gervais
Fourth Annual Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Distinguished Lecture on Intellectual Property

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April 4, 2008

IP/Gender: Mapping the Connections
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February 4, 2008

State Enforcement Strategies to Promote Access to Medicines
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November 6, 2007

Citizens Guide to WIPO
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October 25, 2007

Professor J. Thomas McCarthy
Third Annual Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Distinguished Lecture on Intellectual Property

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October 2, 2007

Chris Wilson (Office of the US trade Represnetative), Matthew Kavanaugh (Student Global AIDS Campaign), James Love (Knowledge Ecology International), and Sean Flynn (PIJIP).
International Week: Access to HIV/AIDS Medicine in the Africa and Caribbean Regions
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September 25, 2007
Professors Pat Aufderheide (AU Center for Social Media), Peter Jaszi (PIJIP), and Renee Hobbs (Temple University).
The Cost of Copyright Confusion for Media Literacy

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April 23, 2007
James Love Director, Knowledge Ecology International on A New Trade Framework for Global Healthcare Research and Development
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James Love is the Director of Knowledge Ecology International (formerly the Consumer Project on Technology), a non-government organization with offices in Washington, DC, London and Geneva. An advisor to a number of UN agencies, national governments, international and regional intergovernmental organizations and public health NGOs, Mr. Love is US co-chair of the Trans Atlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD) Working Group on Intellectual Property, founder and Chairman of Essential Inventions, Chairman of the Union for the Public Domain, Chairman of the Civil Society Coalition, and members of the MSF working groups on Intellectual Property and Research and Development, the Adelphi Charter on Creativity, Innovation and Intellectual Property and the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) Task Force on Intellectual Property.


April 19, 2007
Professor Shamnad Basheer on India's New Patent Regime: TRIPS Implications
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Professor Shamnad Basheer (visiting at George Washington) speaks on India's new Patent Regime: TRIPS Implications.

Professor Basheer completed a bachelor of civil law degree with distinction at Oxford as a Shell Centenary scholar, where his thesis dealing with biotechnology and patent law in India was awarded the second prize in a writing contest held by the Stanford Technology Law Review. He is currently an associate with the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre and is a Wellcome Trust scholar in the doctoral program at Oxford. His research interests include patents and developing countries and the interface between patents and antitrust. He is currently authoring a book on Indian patent law.


April 18, 2007
Tom Faunce and Sean Flynn Discuss Medicines Provisions of Australia and Korea FTAs
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On April 1, 2007, the United States Trade Representative announced the conclusion of a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between the U.S. and the Republic of Korea, and soon thereafter released a summary of the agreement. The summary of the agreement describes a pharmaceutical chapter that appears modeled on, and in many ways appears to exceed, regulations of the operation of public pharmaceutical reimbursement formularies included in the 2004 Australia-US FTA.

Professor Tom Faunce is Director of the Centre for Governance of Knowledge and Development's Globalization and Health Project. He is the Project Director of a three year Australian Research Council Project on the Impact of International Trade Agreements on Access to Medicines in Australia. Sean Flynn is the Associate Director of the Washington College of Law and counsel to the Forum on Democracy and Trade's state working group on pharmaceuticals and trade.


April 10, 2007
User Generated Content: The Copyright Conundrum
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The Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property at the American University Washington College of Law and the Center for Social Media at the American University School of Communications, in collaboration with the DC Chapter of the Copyright Society of the USA, present a lively discussion on the implications of copyright law for makers of participatory media and the platforms on which it is displayed. The discussion will emphasize strategies to avoid or minimize risk of copyright liability.


March 27, 2007
ILSP 25th Anniversary Panel on Traditional Knowledge
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In conjunction with the ILSP's 25th Anniversary Celebrations, PIJIP will sponsor a panel featuring Carlos Correa and others on the relation between traditional knowledge and the development and human rights promotion interests of developing countries.


March 23, 2007
IP/Gender: The Unmapped Connections (Fourth Annual)
View Webcast: Welcome | Panel 1 | Panel 2 | Panel 3

This will be the fourth in a series of workshops discussing the intersection of gender and intellectual property issues. Topics will include the impact on intellectual property law and policy of gender-related imbalances in wealth; cultural access; political power, and social control; creative production and gender; the effects of stereotyping and the feminization and masculinization of participant roles in intellectual property; the gendered development of IP doctrine; and feminist jurisprudential insights about intellectual property law.


September 21, 2006
The Second Annual Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP
Distinguished Lecture on Intellectual Property

The Honorable Alex Kozinski on "Fair Use Revisited"
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At the Second Annual Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, L.L.P. Distinguished Lecture on Intellectual Property, Judge Alex Kozinski of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals delivered a talk entitled ���Revisiting Fair Use.���  In the lecture, Judge Kozinski discussed his proposal to abolish the fair use doctrine and the right to exclude others from use of the work through injunctions and substitute in their place a liability (damages-based) regime for copyright infringement.


March 24, 2006
IP/Gender: The Unmapped Connections
View Webcast: Welcome | Panel 1 | Panel 2 | Panel 3

This was the third in a series of workshops discussing the intersection of gender and intellectual property issues. Topics will include the impact on intellectual property law and policy of gender-related imbalances in wealth; cultural access; political power, and social control; creative production and gender; the effects of stereotyping and the feminization and masculinization of participant roles in intellectual property; the gendered development of IP doctrine; and feminist jurisprudential insights about intellectual property law.

Panel 1

Dan Burk, University of Minnesota Law School
Feminism and Dualism in Intellectual Property

Carys Craig, York University Osgoode Hall Law School
Authorship and Conceptions of the Self: A Feminist Inquiry into Creativity and Copyright

Panel 2

Rebecca Tushnet, Georgetown University Law Center
My Fair Ladies: Sex, Gender, and Transformative Use in Copyright Law

Eileen Kane, Penn State Dickinson School of Law
Breast Cancer and Patents: Molecules and Conflict

Ann Bartow, University of South Carolina Law School
Trademarks of Privilege: Naming Rights and the Physical Public Domain

Panel 3

Susan Scafidi, Southern Methodist University School of Law
Counterfeit Chic: The Culture of the Copy in an Outlaw Medium

Victoria Phillips, American University Washington College of Law
How to Commodify an American Quilt: The Women of Gee���s Bend

Boatema Boateng, University of California - San Diego
Gender Contradictions in Textile Production and IP Law in Ghana


February 24, 2006
Orphan Works: New Prospects for a Solution
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The Copyright Office is examining issues raised by ���orphan works���, i.e. copyrighted works whose owners are difficult or even impossible to locate.  Concerns have been raised that the uncertainty surrounding ownership of such works might needlessly discourage subsequent creators and users from incorporating such works in new creative efforts, or from making such works available to the public.

Featuring:

Prue Adler, Association of Research Libraries 
Jonathan Band, Library Copyright Alliance
Kathleen Franz, American University - History Dept.
Brad Holland, Illustrators' Partnership
Robert Kasunic, U.S. Copyright Office
Oliver Metzger, U.S. Copyright Office
Eugene Mopsik, American Society of Media Photographers
Jay Rosenthal, Recording Artists Coalition
Eric Schwartz, Smith & Metalitz
Matt Skelton, U.S. Copyright Office
Rebecca Tushnet, Georgetown University Law Center
Jennifer Urban, University Southern California Law School


Documentary filmmakers have created, through their professional associations, a clear, easy to understand statement of fair and reasonable approaches to fair use. Read the Documentary Filmmakers' Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use.

Fair Use is the right, in some circumstances, to quote copyrighted material without asking permission or paying for it. It is a crucial feature of copyright law. In fact, it is what keeps copyright from being censorship. You can invoke fair use when the value to the public of what you are saying outweighs the cost to the private owner of the copyright.

Hosted by:

Professor Patricia Aufderheide, American University, School of Communication
Exec. Director, Center for Social Media

Professor Peter Jaszi, American University, Washington College of Law
Co-Director, Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property

Featuring:
George Stoney, Filmmaker and Professor, New York University
Jack Walsh, Co-director, National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture
Michael Donaldson, General Counsel, International Documentary Association
Sandra Ruch, Executive Director, International Documentary Association
Tamara Gould, Independent Television Service


November 3, 2005
Click Here

Does consumer protection have any role to play in copyright law? Many copyright professionals would reply with a resounding "no." Consumer interests have largely been ignored or rebuffed in recent copyright cases. The entertainment industry and key members of Congress seem to be actively hostile to consumers these days, especially to those consumers who engage in unauthorized file sharing of copyrighted music and movies. Proposals to make uploading of copyrighted works a felony, even if done recklessly, to give the Justice Department authority to bring civil actions against file sharers, and to immunize copyright owners who attack file sharers' computers are expressions of Congressional hostility to consumers.

However, consumer protection has in the past and will in the future play a significant role in copyright law. Courts have frequently spoken of the ultimate goal of copyright as being to provide the public (i.e., consumers) with a wide array of new works of authorship that will promote knowledge, culture, and other societal values. Exclusive rights, in this view, are merely a means of achieving this larger goal of providing consumers with access to new works. Copyright law also contains many exceptions and limitations on authors' rights that are either expressly intended to protect consumer interests (e.g., allowing consumers to make backup copies of software) or have been interpreted as protecting consumer interests (e.g., allowing consumers to make copies of TV programs for time-shifting purposes). Significant gaps in regulation allow consumers to make many unauthorized uses of copyrighted works, for example, to perform music in the privacy of their homes because copyright only regulates public performances of protected works. Given the Supreme Court's view that fair uses may be constitutionally required, consumers may have "fair use rights" under copyright law, not merely privileges to do certain things (which can be rescinded by license terms or technical protection measures) or defenses that can be raised if copyright owners sue them. I predict that copyright law will evolve to become an important source of consumer protection in the 21st century.