Course Descriptions

Courses maybe taken individually; discounts are available for multiple courses.

Washington D.C., June 2-21 

Introduction to International Intellectual Property Law I: Foundations (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Michael Carroll, American University
June 2-5 MTWTH, 9:00am-12:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

Introduction to International Intellectual Property Law is taught in two parts and is designed for students to be co-enrolled in each session at the same time. Part I: Foundations is a concentrated survey course with lectures and readings to introduce students to the basic principles and legal instruments of international intellectual property law, including examination of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Property and the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS). The course may serve as a basic introduction to the field of intellectual property, as well as to the international dimension fo the field. Taking both units is strongly recommended for students enrolled in PIJIP’s Geneva Sessions.

Introduction to International Intellectual Property Law II: Practicum (view syllabus & course catalog listing) 
Taught by Sean Flynn, American University
June 2-5 MTWTH, 2:00pm-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

Introduction to International Intellectual Property Law is taught in two parts and is designed for students to be co-enrolled in each session at the same time. Part II: Practicum will apply the rules and concepts of international intellectual property through a series of in-class exercises and policy debates focused on a select number of “hot topics” in the field – including pharmaceutical patents, copyright in the digital environment, and application of enforcement measures to cross-border trade. Taking both units is strongly recommended for students enrolled in PIJIP’s Geneva Sessions.

International Technology Licensing Agreements (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Johan Erauw, Professor, University of Ghent
June 2-12 MTWTH 6:00pm-9:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

This course examines transactions granting the right to use intellectual property rights and their assignment in cross-border business dealings. The course gives ample attention to problems of strategy, valuation and negotiation of contracts involving the international transfer and licensing of copyright and patent rights. The last two classes consist of a negotiation exercise in which students create a mock licensing instrument.

IP Management and Business Strategy (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Carolyn Wimbly Martin, Lutzker & Lutzker LLP
June 6-7 F/S 9:00am-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

Intellectual Property Management and Business Strategy borrows a page from the business school case study teaching method. The course encompasses a broad range of disciplines including copyright, trademark, trade secret, commercial and contract law. Principles of Intellectual Property are addressed in the context of the case problems being discussed. The course objectives skew towards an organizational Intellectual Property audit, economic and transaction-based approach, rather than legislative and judicial analysis. At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to identify challenges and opportunities in Intellectual Property that will guide them in counseling and collaborating with clients and other professionals to most productively manage an intellectual property portfolio in the space between registrations and litigation. Grading will be based on a writing assignment and class participation. SYLLABUS

IP Protection of Mobile Applications (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Jon Grossman, Dickstein and Shapiro, LLP
June 9-10 MT 9:00am-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

Mobile applications are one of the fastest growing computer software sectors. Novice and experienced software developers need to have access to software ecosystems, developer toolkits, and in certain circumstances open source materials to efficiently and effectively create applications. An important aspect in the development life cycle relates to intellectual property planning, including where mobile apps can qualify for intellectual property protection and how they can avoid the pitfalls of intellectual property infringement. This course will cover intellectual property case law developments covering computer software protection including copyright, patent, trade secret and trademarks. The course will also explore through lecture and class exercises topics facing a mobile app developer including open source, cloud computing and unique mobile app development life cycle issues.

Intellectual Property and Sustainable Development (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Jeremy de Beer, Professor, University of Ottawa
June 11-12 WTH 9:00am-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

This course explores how intellectual property intersects with environmental sustainability, technological innovation and knowledge policy. Students in the course will engage in interactive classroom discussion and participate in a simulation of an international negotiation.

Pharmaceutical Regulation and Litigation Under Hatch Waxman (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Sanya Sukduang & Jonathan Davies, Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP
June 20-21 F/S 9:00am-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

This course provides a detailed look into a very complex area of patent litigation. This course will explore the origins of Hatch-Waxman and address various issues that arise litigating these cases, including FDA Orange Book patent listing and delisting, the interplay between patent law and FDA law as it pertains to branded drug exclusivity, settling Hatch-Waxman lawsuits, and the newly enacted counterpart to Hatch-Waxman, the Biologics Price, Competition, and Innovation Act for biological drugs. SYLLABUS

Design and Fashion Protection (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Christine Haight Farley, American University
June 16-19 MTWTH 9:00am-12:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

Design has become an important segment of the economy. Increasingly producers are investing in design, and consumers are recognizing the value of design. Design refers to the aesthetic apperaance of useful objects. This concentrated survey will cover the protection of industrial design (from furniture to graphical user interface) and fashion by means of design patent, trademark, trade dress, and copyright law. The course will focus on existing protections in U.S. law, but we may look at legislative proposals for additional protections and make comparisons to the protection systems in other jurisdictions. The classes will be devoted to a discussion of the readings, group work on problems, and conversations with experts in the field via class visits and Skype.

Standard Essential Patents (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Carter Eltzroth, General Counsel, Digital Video Broadcasting Project
June 16-19 MTWTH 6:00pm-9:00pm - 1 Academic Credit 

The course will ground students in the law governing standards development organizations and patent pools, including those in common use for digital television (for example, ATSC and DVB standards), mobile telephony (LTE), Internet connectivity (IEEE 802.11 or "WiFi") and electrical grid modernization (Zigbee, Multispeak). The course will be taught by the Legal Director of the DVB Project (digital TV standards).

Copyright, Clearance & Fair Use in the Film Industry (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by Michael Donaldson, Partner, Donaldson and Calif
June 13-14 F/S 9:00am-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

This is a special one credit intensive weekend (Friday/Saturday) short course covering specialized issues in film industry representation.  Topics will include copyright clearance rules and practices, fair use in film, including for parodies, satire, and jokes, and copyright clearance negotiations.

Post Grant Review Before the Patent and Trademark Office (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Taught by David Cavanaugh, Partner, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP
June 16-19 MTWTH 2:00pm-5:00pm - 1 Academic Credit

This course will cover post-grant proceedings (PGPs) before the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (PTO). With the enactment of the America Invent Acts in 2011, the PTO has implemented several new proceedings which permit the review of the validity of U.S. patents through a contentious proceeding at the PTO. The new proceedings - Inter Partes Review (IPRs), Covered Business Method (CBMs) and Post Grant Review (PGRs) - have distinct statutory requirements, which must be satisfied prior to institution.



Geneva Switzerland, June 30 - July 18

International Intellectual Property at the World Intellectual Property Organization (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Sean Flynn, American University Washington College of Law
June 30 -July 18 (Mornings) - 2 Academic Credits

This course provides a comprehensive study of international intellectual property policymaking at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a specialized agency of the United Nations created "to encourage creative activity [and] promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world." The course will be organized by American University Professor Sean Flynn and feature numerous lectures and site visits with staff of the World Intellectual Property Organization and other Geneva-based experts, as well as informal opportunities to socialize and network with practitioners and alumni in the field. 

The World Trade Organization: Rule Making and Dispute Settlement (view syllabus & course catalog listing)
Padideh Ala’i, Professor, American University Washington College of Law
June 30 -July 18 (Evenings) - 2 Academic Credits

This intensive program provides an in depth look at the World Trade Organization (WTO) with a focus on the structure and internal workings of the WTO and overview of the substantive areas of international economic relations that are covered in the text of the WTO Agreements. SYLLABUS