Symposium Explores the Legal Impact of the Arab Spring throughout the Middle East and Northern Africa

Libyan Ambassador to the United States among the Featured Panelists

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Washington, D.C., Feb. 8, 2012 – The Arab Spring revolutions throughout the Middle East and North Africa have captured the world’s attention.  American University Washington College of Law’s International Law Review will host “The Impact of the Arab Spring throughout the Middle East and Northern Africa,” a symposium that explores the ensuing legal questions following these uprisings, Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

The event will address whether human rights and international laws have been violated during the Arab Spring movements, if the use of force has been appropriate in certain domestic conflicts, and if it is likely for similar movements to occur in other regions of the world. 

Panelists will discuss how to build the rule of law within the Middle East and Northern Africa, and the role of the international community in internal state disputes.  In addition, participants will dissect the history and causes of the Arab Spring, and explore how future international law norms might be applied in light of the on-going civil unrest throughout the region.

“Over the past year, the world has watched my country and many other Arab countries make important strides toward freedom and democracy," said Ali Aujali, Libyan Ambassador to the United States. “But the Arab Spring is more than a just moment in time, the freedom it created comes with powerful rights and significant responsibilities.  The American UniversityInternational Law Review’s symposium will delve deeply into these issues, including how to build the rule of law throughout the region and the role of the international community in internal state disputes.  It is discussions like these that open and free societies—old and new—are made of."

(Photo: The Honorable Ali Suleiman Aujali, Libyan Ambassador to the United States)

“American University Washington College of Law welcomes Ambassador Aujali and an impressive group of scholars to this timely and important discussion,” said Claudio Grossman, dean, American University Washington College of Law.  “In exploring the legal questions that have arisen as a part of these conflicts, we hope to better understand what role the international community and international law will play in the future of the region.”

Speakers and participants include:

  • The Honorable Ali Suleiman Aujali, Libyan Ambassador to the United States
  • Simon Adams, executive director, The Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect
  • Padideh Ala’i, professor, American University Washington College of Law
  • Yussef Auf, judge, Supreme Judiciary Council, Giza Court of First Instance, Cairo, Egypt; Humphrey Fellow, American University Washington College of Law
  • Rosa Brooks, professor of law, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Nathan Brown, professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University; non-resident senior associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Jonathan Brown, assistant professor, Georgetown University
  • Noura Erakat, adjunct assistant professor, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University
  • Robert Goldman, professor of law, American University Washington College of Law
  • Stephen Grand, director of U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, The Brookings Institution
  • Claudio Grossman, dean, American University Washington College of Law; chair, U.N. Committee on Torture
  • Loubna Skalli -Hanna, assistant professor, International Development Program, School of International Service, American University
  • Michael Wahid Hannah, fellow, The Century Foundation
  • Hamid Khan, senior program officer, Rule of Law Center, The United States Institute of Peace
  • Stephen Mcinerney, executive director, Project on Middle East Democracy
  • Juan Mendez, visiting professor of law, American University Washington College of Law; special rapporteur on Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment, The United Nations
  • Diane Orentlicher, professor of law, American University Washington College of Law
  • David Tafuri, partner, Patton Boggs, LLP, counsel to the National Transitional Council of Libya; Former Rule of Law coordinator for Iraq, U.S. Department of State
  • Anna Triponel, director of the Libya Project, Public International Law and Policy Group
  • Ruth Wedgwood, Edward Burling Professor of International Law and Diplomacy, Johns Hopkins University; Former U.S. Member, U.N. Human Rights Committee.
  • Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director, Middle East And North Africa Division, Human Rights Watch
  • Paul Williams, professor of law & international relations; director of the JD/MA Dual Degree Program, American University Washington College of Law

Read more information or register for the event.

Media interested in attending the event should contact Megan Smith, (202) 274-4276. 

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About American University Washington College of Law

In 1896, American University Washington College of Law became the first law school in the country founded by women. More than 100 years since its founding, this law school community is grounded in the values of equality, diversity, and intellectual rigor. The law school's nationally and internationally recognized programs (in clinical legal education, trial advocacy, international law, and intellectual property to name a few) and dedicated faculty provide its 1700 JD, LL.M., and SJD students with the critical skills and values to have an immediate impact as students and as graduates, in Washington, DC and around the world. For more information, visit wcl.american.edu.


About American University International Law Review

The American University International Law Review publishes articles, critical essays, comments, and casenotes on a wide variety of international law topics, including public and private international law, the law of international organizations, international trade law, international arbitration, and international human rights.AUILR is one of the ten most frequently cited international and comparative student law reviews in the United States.