Nobel Prize Winner Amartya Sen Delivers 13th Annual Grotius Lecture to Successfully Open ASIL Annual Meeting


On Wednesday, March 31, American University Washington College of Law and the American Society of International Law (ASIL) presented the 13th Annual Grotius Lecture to open the 105th ASIL Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. This year's speaker was Nobel Prize Winner Amartya Sen who addressed "International Law and the Global Status of Rights."

Thirteen years ago, AUWCL and ASIL launched the Grotius Lecture as an annual event to open ASIL's annual conference. The event is named for Hugo Grotius, who is considered the father of international law.

"The Grotius Lecture has provided a unique forum for speakers at the top of international law to address issues of vital concern to the international community," said Dean Claudio Grossman. "Professor Sen's address was particularly important because it provided valuable insights on the limits of the law in pursuing values of human dignity."

Sen, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998, is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He has served as president of the Econometric Society, the Indian Economic Association, the American Economic Association and the International Economic Association. His research has ranged over a number of fields in economics, philosophy, and decision theory, including social choice theory, welfare economics, theory of measurement, development economics, public health, gender studies, moral and political philosophy, and the economics of peace and war.

Sen was introduced by Grossman and the evening's distinguished discussant was Professor Kim Lane Scheppele, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the University Center for Human Values as well as director of the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University.

The Grotius Lecture is organized annually by the law school's International Legal Studies Program.