WCL International Law Faculty

American University Washington College of Law's scholarship takes place against a backdrop of a world in dramatic change: the strict separation between "international" and "domestic" is no longer tenable; the demand for and scope of "human rights" is growing; the generation of knowledge is not restricted to educational institutions; and communications technology allows for unprecedented global access to information and ideas. These and other seminal changes create a compelling impetus for analyzing the foundations of the law as well as its role in shaping the world. The law school's rich intellectual life is evident in the faculty's scholarship and the school's engagement with the community, nation, and world, pushing the frontiers of knowledge and leading the way in scholarly developments. Scholarship in its many forms is an essential component of building and shaping the world community.

Following are examples of the ways in which American University Washington College of Law faculty members are making an impact in the many diverse fields of international and comparative law through their scholarship (publications for the last three years are listed). For a full list of faculty, please visit wcl.american.edu/faculty.

Padideh Ala'i

Professor of Law
International Trade Law, WTO Law, Comparative Legal Traditions

Professor Ala'i teaches the law of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and comparative law. She writes in the areas of history and free trade, international efforts to combat corruption, and issues relating to trade and good governance and comparative legal traditions. Her most recent scholarship concentrates on the role of the WTO in promoting transparency norms within member states and the evolving notions of transparency as promoted by the WTO and other international organizations. Ala'i is the Chair of the Comparative Law Section of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS), and, in conjunction with that role, she organized a panel for the 2012 AALS Annual Meeting entitled: Comparative Law and Evolving Norms of Good Governance. Ala'i was the co-chair of the International Economic Law Group (IELG) of the ASIL (2003-2005) and on the Advisory Group of the ASIL, IELG. She received her BA from the University of Oregon and JD from Harvard Law School. Ala'i is the director of the law school's Humphrey Fellowship Program.

Publications: The WTO & the Anti-Corruption Movement, 6 Loyola University Chicago International Law Review 259 (2009); Turkey: At Crossroads of Secular West and Traditional East: An Introduction to WCL Symposium, 24 American University International Law Review 679 (2009).

Kenneth Anderson

Professor of Law
International Business and Finance, Law of War, Terrorism and Human Rights, International NGOs

Professor Anderson teaches international business transactions and other business and finance courses. In addition to his writing on international business law (particularly development finance and microfinance), he researches and writes extensively on international non-governmental organizations, the laws of war and human rights, global governance, and international organizations. He is a fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and member of its Task Force on National Security and Law; non-resident senior fellow of the Brookings Institution in Governance Studies; and senior fellow of the Rift Valley Institute. Anderson's most recent research has been in robotics and the law, paying particular attention to targeted killing and the use of unmanned drone aircraft in conflict. His book on U.S.-UN relations, Returning to Earth, was published by the Hoover Institution Press in 2011. He also serves as the political sciences advisory editor to the Revista de Libros de la Fundacion Caja Madrid, and on the editorial board of the Journal of Terrorism and Political Violence. Anderson actively blogs at the Volokh Conspiracy and Opinio Juris law professor blogs.

Publications: What NGO Accountability Means - And Does Not Mean, 103 Am. J. Intl. L. 1, 107 (Jan. 2009); Civil Society: Do NGOs Have Too Much Power?, in Controversies in Globalization: Contending Approaches to International Relations (edited by Peter M. Haas, John A. Hird, and Beth McBratney, CQ Press, 2009); Targeted Killing in U.S. Counterterrorism Strategy and Law, in Legislating the War on Terror: An Agenda for Reform (edited by Benjamin Wittes, Brookings Institution Press, 2009); Global Philanthropy and Global Governance (chapter in Giving Well: The Ethics of Philanthropy, Oxford University Press, 2010); Do Lawyers and Law Professors Have Any Comparative Advantages in Opining on Financial Regulation Reform? (Washington College of Law, 2010); Living with the UN: American Responsibilities and International Order (The Hoover Institution Press, 2012);

David Baluarte

Practitioner in Residence
International Human Rights

Professor Baluarte is a practitioner in residence in the International Human Rights Law Clinic. Baluarte '05 came to the law school in 2009 from the Immigration Unit of the U.S. Federal Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, where he wrote recommendations to judges in cases involving asylum and Convention against Torture relief. Previously, he was a staff attorney at the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), an organization specializing in litigation and advocacy before the Inter-American Human Rights System, where he was in charge of CEJIL's U.S. and Caribbean docket and various advocacy initiatives before the political bodies of the Organization of American States. Baluarte has recently acted as the lead researcher on a project with the Open Society Justice Initiative on the implementation of the decisions of human rights tribunals. He has a BA from Brown University and a JD from American University Washington College of Law.

Publications: Detention at Guantanamo Bay and the Creation of a New Brand of Statelessness, 3 Equal Rights Review (2009); From Judgment to Justice: Implementing International and Regional Human Rights Decisions (with Christian M. De Vos, Open Society Institute, 2010); Implementation of Judgments: Making International and Regional Litigation Meaningful, 16 Interights Bulletin (with Christian M. De Vos, 2011); Report on stateless persons (for the U.S., UN High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR), and Open Society Justice Initiative (OSJI), 2011); "Strategizing for Compliance: The Evolution of a Compliance Phase of Inter-American Court Litigation and the Strategic Imperative for Victims' Representatives" (American University International Law Review, 2012);

Daniel Bradlow

Professor of Law
International Economic Law

Professor Bradlow specializes in international economic law. In addition to being part of the faculty at American University Washington College of Law, he is the Sarchi Professor of International Development Law and African Economic Relations at the University of Pretoria, the chair of the Roster of Experts for the Independent Review Mechanism at the African Development Bank, and a member of the Board of Directors of International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP). He is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law. His current scholarship focuses on global economic governance, the international financial institutions, creative financing for development, and international legal aspects of sustainable and equitable development. He frequently publishes on the VoxEU website. Bradlow has a BA from University of Witwatersrand, South Africa; JD from Northeastern University; and LL.M. from Georgetown University.

Publications: Developing Countries Debt Crises, International Financial Institutions, and International Law: Some Preliminary Thoughts, 2008 German Yearbook of International Law (2009); course materials, Global Financial Governance, United Nations Institute on Training and Research (2009); Reforming the Global Financial Architecture: Is Real Change Coming? (Institute for Global Dialogue, 2009); Assessing International Financial Reform, in International Law, Economic Globalization and Developing Countries (J. Faundez, C. Tan, eds., Edward Elgar Press, 2010); International Financial Institutions and International Law (edited with David Hunter, Kluwer Publishing 2010); The Operations of International Financial Institutions and International Law, in International Financial Institutions and International Law (D. Bradlow and D. Hunter eds., Kluwer Press, 2010); The Evolution of Operational Policies and Procedures at International Financial Institutions: Normative Significance and Enforcement Potential, report to the ILA Study Group on Responsibility of International Organizations (with Andria Naude Fourie, April 2011); Reforming Global Economic Governance: A Strategy for Middle Powers in the G20, in Going Global (AIIA and Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, May 2011); Independent Accountability Mechanisms at Regional Development Banks, in Handbook of New Forms of Transnational Governance (with Andria Naud�� Fourie, David Held and Thomas Hale eds., Polity Press May 2011).

Michael Carroll

Professor of Law
Intellectual Property Law, Cyberlaw

Professor Carroll is director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property (PIJIP). He joined the faculty in fall 2009 after visiting from Villanova University Law School during the 2008-2009 academic year. Carroll's research focuses on the search for balance in intellectual property law over time in the face of challenges posed by new technologies. He is a founding member of Creative Commons, Inc., a global organization that provides free, standardized copyright licenses to enable and encourage legal sharing of creative and other copyrighted works. Carroll also serves as an advisor to a number of related non-governmental organizations and is recognized as a leading advocate for open access over the Internet to the research that appears in scholarly and scientific journals. He has an AB from the University of Chicago and a JD from Georgetown University.

Publications: Fair Use and Creative Commons Licenses, in Risk and Entrepreneurship (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services, 2009); One Size Does Not Fit All: A Framework For Tailoring Intellectual Property Rights, 70 Ohio State Law Journal (2009); The Role of Copyright Law in Academic Journal Publishing, in Working Within the Boundaries of Intellectual Property (Oxford Press, 2010); The Public Domain Through Property's Lens, Jotwell (March 2011) (review of David Fagundes, Property Rhetoric and the Public Domain, 94 Minn. L. Rev. 652 (2010)). Access to Global Media in Middle and Low Income Countries: A Responsible Study (Intellectual Property: the Journal of Things We Like, 2011); Why Full Open Access Matters (PLoS Biology 9(11), (2011); Public Access to Digital Data Resulting from Federally Funded Research (2012); Public Access to Peer Reviewed Scholarly Publications (2012);

Janie Chuang

Associate Professor of Law
International Law, Gender and Labor Migration, International Commercial Arbitration

Professor Chuang teaches courses in international law, international commercial arbitration, and labor migration. Her scholarship focuses on issues relating to violence against women, specifically, trafficking of women. As an advisor on trafficking issues for the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Chuang participated in the drafting of the UN Trafficking Protocol to the UN Convention on Transnational Organised Crime, advocating for the inclusion of human rights protections for trafficked persons. She has served on the executive council of the American Society of International Law. Chuang has a BA from Yale and a JD from Harvard.

Publications: Rescuing Trafficking from Ideological Capture: Prostitution Reform and Anti-Trafficking Law and Policy, 158 U. Penn. L. Rev. 1655 (2010); Achieving Accountability for Migrant Domestic Worker Abuse, N. Carolina L. Rev. 1627 (2010); Article 6, in Commentary on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (forthcoming, Oxford University Press 2011).

Robert Dinerstein

Professor of Law
Clinical Education, Mental Disability Law, Legal Education

Professor Dinerstein is associate dean for Experiential Education, and director of the law school's Clinical Program and the Disability Rights Law Clinic, which he founded. Dinerstein was appointed by President Clinton in 1994 to serve on the President's Committee on Mental Retardation (on which he served until 2001). He has consulted for the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding the revision of mental health laws in Ghana and Malawi, and was a signatory to the Montreal Declaration on Intellectual Disabilities, adopted in Montreal, Canada, in October 2004, and on a legal opinion on the meaning of Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Dinerstein has done extensive training of clinical law teachers in China and has worked on disability issues in Slovenia and Argentina, among other countries. He currently sits on the boards of directors of the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, Inc., Equal Rights Center, Advocates for Justice Education, and Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, Inc. He is a former elected member of the American Bar Association's Council of the Section on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar (2006-2011) and is a former member of the Board of Governors of the District of Columbia Bar (2002-2005). Prior to joining the law school, Dinerstein worked as an attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, Special Litigation Section, where he handled federal court cases on the rights of people institutionalized in mental hospitals, institutions for people with intellectual disabilities (mental retardation), and juvenile institutions, prisons, and jails. He has an AB from Cornell University and a JD from Yale Law School.

Publications: Lawyers and Clients: Critical Issues in Interviewing and Counseling (with Ann Shalleck and Ellmann, Gunning, and Kruse, Thomson West, Oct. 2009); Teacher's Manual To Lawyers and Clients: Critical Issues in Interviewing and Counseling (with Ann Shalleck and Ellmann, Gunning, and Kruse, Thomson West, Oct. 2009); Disability: When, Why, and How it Matters, and When, Why, and How it Doesn't, 18 AU J. of Gender, Soc. Pol'y & the Law, 79-102 (2009); Anticipating and Meeting Challenges in a Changing Landscape, 18 AU J. of Gender, Soc. Pol'y & the Law, 141-162 (2009); Sexual Expression for Adults with Disabilities: The Role of Guardianship, 23(2) Impact 10 (Spring/Summer 2010).

Christine Haight Farley

Professor of Law
Intellectual Property Law, International IP Law, Art Law

Professor Farley teaches courses in intellectual property law, trademark law, international and comparative trademark law, and art law. She has formerly served as the law school's associate dean for faculty and academic affairs, and served as co-director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property (PIJIP) from 2005-2009. Before teaching, Farley was an associate specializing in intellectual property litigation with Rabinowitz, Boudin, Standard, Krinsky & Lieberman in New York. She received a BA from Binghamton University, a JD from University at Buffalo Law School, and an LL.M. and JSD from Columbia Law School. Farley's scholarly work is in the areas of intellectual property, international law, and art law. Her current projects study the intersection of art and IP and the unstable basis of rights in the development of trademark law. Farley has been a visiting professor at the University of Puerto Rico, where she taught art law, at the University of Paris X-Nanterre, where she taught international intellectual property law, and at Monash University's program in Prato, Italy, where she taught comparative trademark law. In addition, she has lectured on intellectual property law in Australia, Canada, Columbia, Cuba, Jordan, Mongolia, Namibia, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Scotland, and Turkey. She was chair of the Art Law Section of the Association of American Law Schools.

Publications: Imaging the Law: Art, in The Companion to Law and the Humanities (Austin Sarat et al. eds., Cambridge University Press 2009); Convergence and Incongruence: Trademark Law and ICANN's Introduction of New Generic Top-Level Domains, 25 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 625 (2009);

Sean Flynn

Professorial Lecturer in Residence
Intellectual Property and Human Rights, Comparative Constitutional Law, Law and Development

Professor Flynn is associate director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property (PIJIP), through which he designs and manages a wide variety of research and advocacy projects that promote public interests in intellectual property and information law. Flynn teaches courses on the intersection of intellectual property, trade law, and human rights. He serves as counsel for advocacy organizations and state legislatures seeking to promote and defend regulations that promote access to essential medicines. Prior to joining the law school, Flynn completed clerkships with Chief Justice Arthur Chaskalson on the South African Constitutional Court and Judge Raymond Fisher on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He has a BA from Pitzer College and a JD from Harvard.

Publications: Using Competition Law to Promote Access to Knowledge, in From IP To Access To Knowledge (A. Kapszynski ed., 2009); Untold Stories in South Africa: Creative Consequences of the Rights Clearance Culture for Documentary Filmmakers (with Peter Jaszi, Ford Foundation, 2009); An Economic Justification for Open Access to Essential Medicine Patents in Developing Countries, 37 Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 184 (with Hollis, A. & Palmedo, M., 2009); Special 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 and Access to Medicine, 7 Journal of Generic Medicine 309 (Oct. 2010); Using Competition Law to Promote Access to Knowledge, in Access to Knowledge in the Age of Intellectual Property (Amy Kapczynski and Gaelle Kirkorian, eds., MIT Press 2011); Networked Governance and the USTR, in Media Piracy in Emerging Economies (Social Science Research Council 2011); Data Privacy and the First Amendment, Am. J. of Law & Medicine (forthcoming 2011);

Anna Gelpern

Professor of Law
International Finance, Financial Institutions

Professor Gelpern's research explores the legal and policy implications of international capital flows. She has published articles on debt, development, and financial globalization. She has contributed to international initiatives on financial reform and sovereign borrowing, including part of the Second Warwick Commission and as an expert for the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. Before joining the faculty, Gelpern was an associate professor at Rutgers School of Law-Newark and Rutgers University Division of Global Affairs. She previously served in legal and policy positions at the U.S. Treasury Department, where she focused on international debt and development issues, international financial institutions, and managing financial crises. She practiced with Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York and London, advising governments and private sector clients on debt restructuring, investment, and other cross-border financial transactions. Gelpern earned an AB from Princeton University, a JD from Harvard Law School, and a M.Sc. from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Publications: Commentary: Contracts as Organizations, 51 Ariz. L. Rev. 1051 (2009); Financial Crisis Containment, 41 University of Connecticut Law Review 1051 (May 2009); Feel-Good Formalism, 35 Queen's Law Journal 97 (2009); Law & Development Narrow and Law & Development Broad, 104 Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy (2009); Rewriting Frankenstein Contracts: Workout Prohibitions in Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities, 82 Southern California Law Review 1075 (2009); Commentary: Contracts as Organizations, 51 Arizona Law Review (2009); scholarship referenced in Overcoming Developing Country Debt Crisis (Barry Herman, Jose Antonio Ocampo, Shari Spiegel, 2009); Peer-to-Peer Financing for Development: Regulating the Intermediaries, 42 New York University Journal of International Law & Politics 1209 (with Kevin E. Davis, 2010); How CACs Became Boilerplate: The Politics of Contract Change in Sovereign Debt Restructuring (with G. Mitu Gulati, Jose Antonio Ocampo et al., eds., Initiative for Policy Dialogue/Oxford University Press, 2010); Banks, Governments, and Debt Crises, in Great Decisions, 49-60 (Foreign Policy Association 2011); "Sovereignty, Accountability, and the Wealth Fund Governance Conundrum" (Asian Journal of Int'l Law, Cambridge University Press, 2011); International Finance: Transactions, Policy, and Regulation (with Hal S. Scott, 18th edition, Foundation Press, 2011);

Robert Goldman

Professor of Law, Louis C. James Scholar
International and Human Rights Law, U.S. and Foreign Policy, Terrorism, Law of Armed Conflict

Professor Goldman is co-director of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and faculty director of the War Crimes Research Office. From 1996 to 2004, he was a member of the Organization of American States' Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and its president in 1999. From July 2004 to July 2005, Goldman was the UN Human Rights Commission's independent expert on the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism. From 2005 to 2009, he was one of eight jurists named by the International Commission of Jurists to serve on the Eminent Jurists Panel on Terrorism, Counterterrorism and Human Rights. Goldman co-authored that group's report, "Assessing Damage, Urging Action," which was released in early 2009. In 2008, Goldman was elected commissioner and member of the Executive Committee of the International Commission of Jurists. He has a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and a JD from the University of Virginia.

Publications: Report of the Eminent Jurists Panel on Terrorism, Counterterrorism and Human Rights (with co-author, International Commission of Jurists, Feb. 2009); The International Commission of Jurists, in Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law (Oxford University Press, 2009); History and Action: the Inter-American Human Rights System and the Role of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, 31 Human Rights Quarterly 856-887 (Nov. 2009); Internal Displacement, the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, the Principles' Normative Status, and the Need for Their Effective Domestic Implementation in Colombia, 2 Colombian Yearbook of International Law (2009);

Horacio Grigera Na��n

Distinguished Practitioner in Residence
International Commercial Arbitration

Professor Grigera Na��n, director of the Center on International Commercial Arbitration, is an independent international arbitrator and consultant on business and international law matters. He is a former secretary general of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce and has been a practitioner in the field of international commercial arbitration and international business law for more than 25 years. Grigera Na��n has also widely published in those areas. He is a member of the American Law Institute, former special counsel with White & Case LLP, and former senior counsel with the IFC in Washington, D.C. Grigera Na��n is a member of the Argentine Federal, New York, District of Columbia, and U.S. Supreme Court Bars. He has a JD and LL.D. from the School of Law of the University of Buenos Aires and an LL.M. and SJD from Harvard.

Publications: Commercial Arbitration: The Impact of Uniform Law on National Law, Limits and Possibilities (International Academy of Comparative Law, Mexican Branch, 2009); Cultural Clashes in International Commercial Arbitration: How Much of a Real Issue?, in Liber Amicorum, Bernardo Cremades (M. A. Fernandez-Ballesteros & D. Arias eds., 2010); co-editor, International Commercial Arbitration Practice: 21st Century Perspectives (with Paul E. Mason eds., LexisNexis 2010);

Claudio Grossman

Dean, Professor of Law, Raymond I. Geraldson Scholar for International and Humanitarian Law
International Law, Human Rights, Comparative Law, Inter-American Affairs

Dean Grossman, an accomplished scholar in the areas of international law and human rights, was appointed dean of American University Washington College of Law in 1995. He was unanimously re-elected to a third term as chair of the UN CAT in May 2012, where he has been a member since 2003 and previously served as vice chair (2003-2008). In October 2009, Grossman became the first UN CAT chair to present the Committee's work to the United Nations General Assembly. He is a former member of the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL's Files. Grossman served as president of the College of the Americas, an organization of colleges and universities in the Western Hemisphere, from November 2003-November 2007. He was a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights from 1993-2001, where he served in numerous capacities, including twice as its president (1996 and 2001) as well as the special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous populations and the special rapporteur on women's rights. He has participated in numerous on-site visits and election-observing missions in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East and has worked on international legal issues with the United Nations and the International Human Rights Law Group. He is the author of numerous books and articles on international law, human rights, and the law of international organizations. Grossman has a Licenciado en Ciencias Jur��dicas y Sociales from Universidad de Chile, Santiago, and an SJD from GU Amsterdam.

Publications: Domestic Incorporation of Obligations Under the Convention against Torture, 16 Human Rights Brief 12 (with L. Gallegos, Spring 2009 Special Edition); The Normative Value of the Istanbul Protocol, in Shedding Light on a Dark Practice: Using the Istanbul Protocol to Document Torture (International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims, 2009); Preparing Human Rights Advocates: Institutionalizing from Below, 3 Americas Quarterly 3 (2009); Preface to Interview with Judge Antonio A. Cancado Trindade, Inter-American Court of Human Rights, 31 (4) Hum. Rts. Q. 986 (Nov. 2009); Prologue and El futuro del sistema interamericano de derechos humanos, in Protecci��n Internacional de Derechos Humanos y Estado de Derecho (Joaqu��n Gonz��lez Ib����ez ed., 2009); Statement by the Chairperson of the UN Committee against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (presented at the 64th session of the UN General Assembly, Third Committee, New York, NY, Oct. 20, 2009); Opening Remarks, The Scope of Reparations: Challenges in Defining their Scope and Guaranteeing their Enforcement, and Closing Remarks, 59 Am. U. L. Rev. 164-68, 198-99, 257 (2009); The Inter-American System and Its Evolution, 1 Inter-American & European Human Rights Journal 5 (2009); remarks, Strengthening the Prohibition against Torture: The Evolution of the UN Committee against Torture, 17 Human Rights Brief 4 (Spring 2010 Special Edition); Strengthening the Prohibition against Torture: The Evolution of the UN Committee against Torture, 17 Human Rights Brief 4 (Spring 2010 Special Edition); The Role of a Law School Dean: Balancing a Variety of Roles and Interests. The American University Washington College of Law Experience, 29 Penn St. Int'l L. Rev. 113, 113-119 (2010); Paradigmas De La Nueva Formaci��n Jur��dica En Estados Unidos, in La Crisis de las Fuentes del Derecho en la Globalizacion 95 (Biblioteca Jur��dica Dik�� Ltda. 2010); Legal Education Reform, 32 Harvard International Review 4 (Fall 2010); Raising the Bar: U.S. Legal Education in an International Setting, 32 Harvard International Review 16-18 (Fall 2010); La institucionalizaci��n desde abajo: preparando a los defensores de los derechos humanos, Perspectiva, Edici��n 24, 52, 52-55 (2010). Statement, in capacity as chairperson of the Committee against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (66th Session of the U.N. General Assembly, Third Committee, Oct. 2011); Filed pleading, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in the case of Lorenzo Enrique Copello Castillo y Otros vs Cuba (case number 12.477) (Washington, D.C., Nov. 2011); "Libertad de expresi��n en el sistema interamericano de protecci��n de los derechos humanos" (2 Nos Ad Justitiam Esse Natos, Edeval & Universidad de Valpara��so, 2011); "Enhancing Visits to Places of Detention: Promoting Collaboration" (Special Edition, Human Rights Brief, Spring 2011); "Challenges to Freedom of Expression within the Inter-American System: A Jurisprudential Analysis" (Human Rights Quarterly, 2012); "American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man" (Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law, 2012);

Egon Guttman

Levitt Memorial Trust Scholar, Emeritus Professor of Law
Corporate and Commercial Law, International Securities Law

Professor Guttman holds expertise in corporate and commercial law, especially securities regulation and broker-dealer customer relations. His expertise in commercial law includes sales, secured transactions, negotiable instruments and other payment devices, such as credit/debit cards, letters of credit, and bank collection. As a member of the American Law Institute (ALI) and the American Bar Association (ABA), Guttman has been involved in the revisions of various articles of the Uniform Commercial Code, and, as a member of U.S. Department of State working groups, in the drafting of conventions relating to international commercial transactions. Guttman has published extensively in Europe and in the United States. His most recent publication is a treatise on modern securities transfers. Guttman has a LL.B and LL.M. from University of London and is a barrister at law of the Middle Temple, England.

Publications: Supplement to Modern Securities Transfers (updates of chapters 1-20, including rewrites of chapters 7, 12, 15, 16, 17, and 18, Thomson/West, 2 vols. 2009); Modern Securities Transfer (4th edition, West Group 2010). Modern Securities Transfers (4th Securities Law Series, West Thomson, Volumes 28 & 28 A, Oct. 2011);

Heather Hughes

Professor of Law
Secured Transactions, Commercial Law

Professor Hughes teaches in the areas of commercial law and property. Her research focuses on commercial transactions, social justice, ethics, and critical theory. Before joining the faculty, Hughes was an assistant professor at Florida International University College of Law, and, prior to teaching, she practiced in the business department at Morrison & Foerster, LLP in San Francisco, and the commercial transactions group at a private firm in Denver. She has a BA from University of Chicago and a JD from Harvard Law School.

Publications: Enabling Investment inEnvironmental Sustainability, 85 Ind. L.J. 597 (2010). "Enabling Investment in Environmental Sustainability" (Environmental Law Reporter, Aug. 2011);

David Hunter

Professor of Law
Environmental Law, International Environmental Law

Professor Hunter is director of the International Legal Studies Program, the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law, and the Environmental Law Summer Program. He is the former executive director of the Center for International Environmental Law and was previously an associate with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. He currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-U.S., Center for Progressive Reform, the Project on Government Oversight, and the Bank Information Center. He is a member of the steering committee of the IUCN Commission on Environmental Law and the OAS Experts Group on Environmental Law. Hunter is also co-editor-in-chief of the Yearbook on International Environmental Law, published annually by Oxford Press. Hunter has a BA from the University of Michigan and JD from Harvard.

Publications: Climate Change and the Law (with Chris Wold & Melissa Powers, Lexis/Nexis Publishing, 2009); International Climate Negotiations: Opportunities and Challenges for the Obama Administration, 19 Duke Envtl. L. & Pol'y Forum 247 (Spring 2009); Lessons Learned from the European Union's Climate Policy, 27 Wis. Int'l L. J., 575-606 (Spring 2010); Human Rights Implications for the Climate Negotiations, 11 Or. Intl. L. Rev. 331-64 (Spring 2010); Implications of the Copenhagen Accord, 4 Sust. Dev. L. & Pol'y J. (Winter 2010); International Environmental Law & Policy (with James Salzman and Durwood Zaelke, 4th ed., Foundation Press 2010); International Financial Institutions and International Law (edited with Daniel Bradlow, Kluwer Publishing 2010); Yearbook on International Environmental Law (edited with Ole Kristian Fauchald and Wang Xi, Oxford University Press, 2010); International Law and Public Participation in Policy Making at International Financial Institutions, in International Financial Institutions and International Law (Kluwer Publishing 2010); International Environmental Law Year-in-Review, The International Lawyer (with David R. Downes, et al., Summer 2010). "Migratory Connectivity and the Conservation of Migratory Wildlife" (with Pete Marra and Anne Perrault, 41 Envtl. L. 317, 2011);

Peter Jaszi

Professor of Law
International Copyright Law, Copyright History and Theory

Professor Jaszi teaches domestic and international copyright law, and law and literature. He is director of the Glushko-Samuelson Intellectual Property Law Clinic and helped to establish the Program on Intellectual Property and Information Justice (PIJIP). Jaszi is a frequent speaker to professional audiences in the United States and abroad, and is a trustee of the Copyright Society of the United States and a member of the editorial board of its journal. Since 2005, Jaszi has been working with Professor Patricia Aufderheide of American University's Center for Social Media on projects designed to promote the understanding of fair use by documentary filmmakers and other creators. In 2011 Jaszi & Aufderheide released a book, Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright. In 2006-2007, he led an interdisciplinary research team, funded by the Ford Foundation, to investigate the connections between intellectual law and the traditional arts in Indonesia. In 2007, he received the American Library Association's L. Ray Patterson Copyright Award, and, in 2009, the Intellectual Property Section of the District of Columbia Bar honored him as the year's "Champion of Intellectual Property." For the years 2009-2011, Jaszi has served as the intellectual property scholar of the Center for Intellectual Property at the University of Maryland University College. Jaszi has an AB and JD from Harvard.

Publications: Protection for Pre-1972 Sound Recordings under State Law and Its Impact on Use by Nonprofit Institutions: A 10-State Analysis (Library of Congress, Sept. 2009); Traditional Culture: A Step Forward for Protection in Indonesia (Laporan Penelitian, Fall 2009); Untold Stories in South Africa: Creative Consequences of the Rights Clearance Culture for Documentary Filmmakers (with Sean Flynn, Ford Foundation, Dec. 2009); Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for OpenCourseWare (American University Center for Social Media, 2009); Honest Truths: Documentary Filmmakers on Ethical Challenges in Their Work (with Aufderheide, P., Chandra, M., American University Center for Social Media, 2009) Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back in Copyright (with Pat Aufderheide,University Of Chicago Press 2011).

Nicholas Kittrie

University Professor
International and Comparative Criminal Law, Terrorism and Political Crime, Minority Rights

Professor Kittrie is an expert in American and international public and criminal law. Former dean of the law school, former president of the American Society of Criminology, and chair of the United Nations Alliance of NGOs on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, Kittrie is the author and editor of more than 15 books and numerous articles. He frequently appears in mass media to deal with topics, such as political offenders, terrorist activities, war crimes, drugs and alcohol, extradition, penology, and criminal sentencing. Kittrie has served as legal consultant to several foreign governments and to the U.S. Vice President's Commission on Terrorism. Kittrie has an AB, MA, and LL.B. from the University of Kansas, LL.M. and SJD from Georgetown University Law Center, and has also studied at the University of Cairo, University of Chicago, and Yale University Law School.

Publications: The International Law of War and America's War on Terrorism, 25 International Journal on World Peace (Sept. 2008); Criminal Law: State and Federal Policy and Law (2008 ed.); Sentencing, Sanctions and Corrections: Cases and Materials (2008 supplement to Foundation Press ed.); International Criminal Law and Procedure (2008 ed.);

Daniela Kraiem

Practitioner-in-Residence
Gender Law, Labor and Employment Law

Professor Kraiem is the associate director of the Women and the Law Program at American University Washington College of Law. Her current research interests include the political economy of long-term care for the elderly and persons with disabilities, child care, and gender and legal education. Kraiem works with the students, faculty, and staff of the law school to incorporate gender into all aspects of legal education. Prior to joining the law school, Kraiem represented labor unions and workers as an associate at the law firm of McCarthy, Johnson and Miller in San Francisco. She has a BA from University of California, Santa Barbara, and a JD from University of California, Davis.

Publications: Consumer Direction in Medicaid Long Term Care: Autonomy, Commodification of Family Labor, and Community Resilience, 19 Am. U. J. of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 671 (2011);

Jerome Levinson

Distinguished Lawyer-in-Residence
International Finance, Worker's Rights

Professor Levinson specializes in the legal aspects of foreign direct investment, and he is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese. Levinson is well known for his knowledge of international financial issues and workers' rights. He teaches Legal Aspects of Foreign Direct Investment, Issues in International Trade, and International Financial Institutions.

Publications: International Labor Law and the 1F1s, in International Financial Institutions and International Law (Kluwer Publishing, 2010). European Consumer Law and Policy, Oxford Y.B. Europe.

Claudia Martin

Professorial Lecturer-in-Residence
International Law, International and Comparative Human Rights Law, Inter-American Human Rights Law

Professor Martin is co-director of the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. She serves as a contributing editor to Oxford Reports on International Human Rights Law; a member of the Editorial Board, Oxford Reports on International Law in Domestic Courts, Oxford University Press and Amsterdam Center for International Law; a member of the Editorial Board, Revista Iberoamericana de Derechos Humanos, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico; and a contributor on inter-American human rights law for the Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights. Martin holds a law degree from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina) and an LL.M. from American University Washington College of Law.

Publications: The Inter-American Human Rights System: Selected Examples of its Supervisory Work, in Research Handbook in International Human Rights Law (with Diego Rodr��guez-Pinz��n, S. Joseph and A. Mc Beth eds., Edgar Elgar Publishing, 2010); The Inter-American Human Rights System: Selected Examples of its Supervisory Work, in Research Handbook in International Human Rights Law (with Diego Rodr��guez-Pinz��n, S. Joseph and A. McBeth eds., Edgar Elgar Publishing 2010);

Juan Mendez

Visiting Professor of Law
International Law, International Human Rights Law

Juan E. Mendez is a visiting professor of law, and since November 2010, the UN special rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment. In 2009 and 2010 he was the special advisor on Prevention to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. He is also co-chair of the Human Rights Institute of the International Bar Association. Until May 2009, he was the president of the International Center for Transnational Justice (ICTJ) and in the summer of 2009 he was a scholar-in-residence at the Ford Foundation in New York. Concurrent with his duties at ICTJ, the Honorable Kofi Annan named Mr. M��ndez his special advisor on the Prevention of Genocide, a task he performed from 2004 to 2007.

Publications: "Justice and Prevention" (in "The International Criminal Court and Complementarity: From Theory to Practice," Carsten Stahn and Mohamed el Zeidy, eds., Cambridge: CUP, Oct. 2011); "Taking a Stand: The Evolution of Human Rights" (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2011);

Fernanda Nicola

Associate Professor of Law
Comparative Law, the Law of the European Union, Torts, Local Government Law

Professor Nicola, who joined the faculty in 2006, is an expert in comparative law, the law of the European Union, torts, and local government law. Previously, she was an adjunct professor of law at the New England School of Law and taught at Harvard Law School, where she received the Mancini Prize on European Law. Her current scholarship is in the area of comparative private, administrative, and family law, and she was part of the steering committee of the XVIII International Congress of Comparative Law in Washington, D.C. She received her SJD from Harvard Law School, a Ph.D. from Trento University, and a BA and law degree from the University of Turin (Italy).

Publications: Promises of Accession: The Asymmetrical Trade Relationship between Turkey and the EU, 24 American U. Intl. L. Rev. 739 (2009); Family Law Exceptionalism in Comparative Law, 58 Am. J. Comp. L. (2010); ���Creatures of the State': Regulatory Federalism, Local Immunities, and EU Waste Regulation in Comparative Perspective, in Comparative Administrative Law (Susan Rose-Ackerman and Peter Lindseth eds., Elgar Publishing 2010); Family Law Exceptionalism in Comparative Law, 58 Am. J. Comp. L. 777 (Fall 2010); book review, The Nemesis of European Constitutionalism: Peter Lindseth's Power and Legitimacy, Opinio Juris (Apr. 25, 2011). "What's Love Got to Do with It? Stereotypical Women in Dispositionist Torts" (Ideology, Psychology and the Law, Jon Hanson, Ed, OUP, Dec. 2011); "The False Promise of Decentralization in EU Cohesion Policy" (20 Tul. J. Int'l & Comp. L. 65, 2011); "���Creatures of the State': Regulatory Federalism, Local Immunities, and EU Waste Regulation in Comparative Perspective" (Comparative Administrative Law, Susan Rose-Ackerman and Peter Lindseth Eds., Elgar Publishing, 2011);

Diane Orentlicher

Professor of Law
Public International Law, United Nations Law, International Criminal Law, International Criminal Court

Professor Orentlicher currently serves as deputy, Office of War Crimes Issues, in the U.S. Department of State, while on leave from the law school. She is co-director of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. From 1995 to 2004, she served as faculty director of the law school's War Crimes Research Office, which has provided legal assistance to international criminal tribunals since 1995. Described by the Washington Diplomat as "one of the world's leading authorities on . . .war crimes tribunals," Orentlicher has lectured and written extensively on the scope of states' obligations to address mass atrocities and on the law and policy issues relating to international criminal tribunals and universal jurisdiction. She has served as an independent expert and consultant to the United Nations in various capacities relating to the UN's efforts to combat impunity. In September 2004, Orentlicher was appointed by the United Nations secretary-general as independent expert to update the UN's Set of Principles for the protection and promotion of human rights through action to combat impunity. She has a BA from Yale and a JD from Columbia.

Publications: Crimes Against Humanity: A Legislative Agenda for the United States, The Enforcement of International Criminal Law (Aegis, 2009); That Someone Guilty Be Punished: The Impact of the ICTY in Bosnia (Open Society Justice Initiative and International Center for Transitional Justice, 2010);

Jayesh Rathod

Assistant Professor of Law
Immigrants' Rights, Labor and Employment

Professor Rathod is the director of the Immigrant Justice Clinic. His areas of expertise and scholarly interests include immigrants' rights, labor and employment, occupational safety and health, and the intersection of law and organizing. He is director of the law school's Immigrant Justice Clinic. Prior to joining the faculty, he was a staff attorney at CASA of Maryland, representing low-wage immigrant workers on employment law and immigration matters, and participating in worker education, organizing, and advocacy efforts. He also practiced in the litigation section at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering LLP, and was law clerk to the Honorable Louis F. Oberdorfer, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Over the course of his career, he has worked with numerous nongovernmental organizations to advance the civil and human rights of communities in the United States and abroad. He has an AB from Harvard and a JD from Columbia.

Publications: Immigrant Labor and the Occupational Safety and Health Regime, 33 New York University Review of Law & Social Change 479 (2009); A Season of Change: Reforming the H-2B Guest Worker Program, 45 Clearinghouse Rev. 20 (May-June 2011); Beyond the "Chilling Effect": Immigrant Worker Behavior and the Regulation of Occupational Safety & Health, 14 Employee Rights & Empl. Policy J. 267 (2010); Book Review: Beate Andrees & Patrick Belser, Forced Labor: Coercion & Exploitation in the Private Economy, 31 Comp. Lab. L. & Policy J. 861 (2010);

Diego Rodr��guez-Pinz��n

Professorial Lecturer in Residence
International Law, Human Rights Law

Professor Rodr��guez-Pinz��n is co-director of the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. He teaches courses in the fields of international law and human rights law. He is currently ad hoc judge at the Inter-American Court on Human Rights of the Organization of American States. He has recently participated as invited faculty in the ��bo Akademi Institute for Human Rights in Turku, Finland, in the Ren�� Cassin International Institute of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France, and in the Interdisciplinary Course of the Inter-American Institute on Human Rights in San Jos��, Costa Rica, among other prestigious international programs. As correspondent for the British periodical Butterworths Human Rights Cases, Rodr��guez-Pinz��n covers the Americas; he also reports on the Inter-American System for The Netherlands Human Rights Quarterly. He has served as international legal consultant for the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) and the OAS, among other institutions. He was also staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the OAS and officer for Latin America at the International Human Rights Law Group, a Washington, D.C.-based nongovernmental organization. He has a JD from Universidad de los Andes, LL.M. from American University Washington College of Law, and a SJD from George Washington University.

Publications: Basic Facts of the Individual Complaint Procedure of the Inter-American Human Rights System, in International Human Rights Monitoring Mechanisms (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Raoul Wallenberg Institute on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, 2009 ); La Comisi��n Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, in Derechos Humanos, Relaciones Internacionales y Globalizacion (Grupo Editorial Iba��ez, 2nd ed., 2009); The Inter-American Commission, Netherlands Human Rights Quarterly (2009); The Inter-American Human Rights System: Selected Examples of its Supervisory Work, in Research Handbook in International Human Rights Law (with Claudia Martin, S. Joesph and A. McBeth eds., Edgar Elgar Publishing, 2010); The Inter-American Commission, Netherlands Human Rights Quarterly (2010); The Inter-American Human Rights System: Selected Examples of its Supervisory Work, in Research Handbook in International Human Rights Law (with Claudia Martin, S. Joseph and A. McBeth eds., Edgar Elgar Publishing 2010); "The Inter-American Human Rights System and Transitional Processes" (Transitional Jurisprudence - The ECHR and Other Regional Human Rights Approaches To Transition, Cambridge University Press, UK, 2011); "Selected Examples of the Contemporary Practice of the Inter-American System In Confronting Grave Violations of Human Rights: United States And Colombia" (Making Peoples Heard: Essays On Human Rights In Honour Of Gudmundur Alfredsson, Leiden.Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011); co-author, examples of legal and institutional frameworks to protect and realize the right to health of older persons (with Claudia Martin and Vladislav Michal����k, U.N. Special Rapporteur on the Right of Everyone to the Highest Attainable Standard of Physical and Mental Health, 2011); co-author, amicus brief (Constitutional Court of Colombia, Washington, D.C. and Bogota, Colombia, 2011); "The Inter-American System: Landmark Cases at the Inter-American Commission" (Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights, Utrecht, The Netherlands, Intersentia, 2012);

Susana S��Couto

Professorial Lecturer in Residence
International Criminal Courts, International Criminal Law, Gender and Human Rights Law

Professor S��Couto directs the law school's War Crimes Research Office, which promotes the development and enforcement of international criminal and humanitarian law. She also directs the Summer Law Program in The Hague, and teaches courses on international criminal courts, gender and human rights law and the responses of international humanitarian law and international criminal law to women affected by conflict. She served as the co-chair of the Women's International Law Interest Group of the American Society for International Law (2006-2009 term), and was recently awarded The Women's Law Center's 22nd Annual Dorothy Beatty Memorial Award for her significant contributions to women's rights. Prior to joining the law school, S��Couto directed the Legal Services Program at Women Empowered Against Violence. She has a BA from Brown University, a JD from Northeastern University Law School, and a M.A.L.D. from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

Publications: The Importance of Effective Investigation of Sexual Violence and Gender-Based Crimes at the International Criminal Court, 17 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 337 (with Katherine Cleary, 2009); The Confirmation of Charges Process at the International Criminal Court, in Protecci��n Internacional de Derechos Humanos y Estado de Derecho (with Katherine Cleary, Joaqu��n Gonz��lez Ib����ez, ed., 2009); The Katanga Complementarity Decision: Sound Law, but Flawed Policy, 23 Leiden Journal of International Law 363 (with Katherine Cleary, 2010); Introductory Note for The International Criminal Court: Appeal of the Prosecutor Against the "Decision on the Prosecution's Application for a Warrant of Arrest against Omar Hassan Ahmad Al Bashir," 49 Int'l Legal Materials 922 (2010); Introduction to Panel on Gender Crimes at the International Level, in Proceedings of the Third International Humanitarian Law Dialogs, 42 Studies in Int'l Legal Pol'y 191 (Elizabeth Andersen & David Crane eds., 2010); The Women's Protocol to the African Charter and Sexual Violence in the Context of Armed Conflict or Other Mass Atrocity, 16 Wash. & Lee J. of Civ. Rts & Soc. Just. 173 (with Katherine Cleary, Fall 2009, released Nov. 2010); Introduction to Amicus Brief on The Practice of Cumulative Charging before International Criminal Bodies, submitted by the War Crimes Research Office to the Appeals Chamber of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, 22 Crim. L. Forum (online June 2011; hardcopy Sept. 2011); Introduction to Amicus Brief, "The Practice of Cumulative Charging before International Criminal Bodies" (22Criminal Law Forum, Oct. 2011); "Victim Participation at the International Criminal Court and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia: A Feminist Project?" (18 Michigan Journal of Gender & the Law, 2012);

Macarena S��ez

Fellow in International Legal Studies
Feminist Jurisprudence, Women's Human Rights

Professor S��ez teaches courses in comparative family law and Latin American law.
Previously, S��ez was the law school's international programs coordinator as well as director of the International JD Dual Degree Program and the Chile Summer Law Program. She has taught at University of Chile School of Law, University of Puerto Rico School of Law, and in the Department of Social Studies at University of Chile. She also coordinates a Network of Latin American Scholars on gender, sexuality, and legal education. S��ez has a JD from the University of Chile School of Law and an LL.M. from Yale.

Publications: Breve an��lisis de las tendencias feministas contempor��neas y su relaci��n con el derecho, in Derechos Humanos, Relaciones Internacionales y Globalizaci��n: Studia in honorem Nelson Mandela (Grupo Editorial Iba��ez, Mar. 2007, re-edited Sept. 2009); La Mirada de los Jueces: Decisiones sobre G��nero y Sexualidad en Latinoam��rica (with Cristina Motta eds., Siglo del Hombre Press, Bogot��, 2008); Karen Atala v. Chile in the inter-American human rights system, FOCALPoint (March 2011). "Same-Sex Marriage" ("General Reports of the XVIIIth Congress of the International Academy of Comparative Law," 2012);

Herman Schwartz

Professor of Law
Civil Liberties, Human Rights Law

Professor Schwartz's long career in academia, publishing, and community service has focused his attention and the world's on issues of civil rights and civil liberties as they have played out in courts and prisons across the globe. He has worked with the United Nations, the human rights advocacy groups Helsinki Watch and Human Rights Watch, the Israel-U.S. Civil Liberties Law Program (which he founded), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Prison Project (which he founded), Washington College of Law's Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, and other organizations. In June 2009, a prize in honor of his work in Israel, which has been credited by a leading Israeli newspaper with "changing the map of human rights in Israel," was established. He has served as public delegate for the United States to the UN Human Rights Commission and to the Vienna World Conference on Human Rights. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Open Society Institute Justice Initiative. One of Schwartz's special interests in recent years has been the emerging democracies of Eastern Europe, and he has written numerous articles and a book on the emerging constitutional order in that region. He has served as an advisor on constitutional and human rights reform to numerous Central and Eastern European nations and former Soviet Union nations. Recently he was called upon to comment and advise on constitutional reform in Afghanistan, Iraq, and several African countries. Schwartz's work has been recognized with such honors as the 2006 "Champion of Justice" Award from the Alliance for Justice, the William Conable Award for Civil Rights, the Citizens Council for Human Rights Award, and the ACLU-Niagara Frontier Award for Civil Liberties. He has an AB and a JD from Harvard.

Publications: "Scuttle SCOTUS's Life Tenure" (Politico, March 2012); "SCOTUS In Need of Ethics Code" (Politico, May 2011);

Ann Shalleck

Professor of Law, Carrington Shields Scholar
Clinical Legal Education, Legal Theory, Family Law, Child Welfare

Professor Shalleck is director of the Women and the Law Program and the Women in International Law Program. She has expertise in clinical legal education, legal theory, family law, and child welfare. Shalleck has been a presenter at many conferences on clinical legal education, gender and the law, and gender and international human rights and has organized numerous symposia on issues in these areas, including comparative family law, domestic violence, and the achievement of greater equality. She has authored many books and articles on clinical education, child welfare, women's rights, and feminist theory. An expert on legal education, in particular curricular issues, she serves on the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law Schools. She has an AB from Bryn Mawr College and a JD from Harvard.

Publications: Lawyers and Clients: Critical Issues in Interviewing and Counseling (with Robert Dinerstein and Ellmann, Gunning, and Kruse, Thomson/West, Oct. 2009); Teacher's Manual To Lawyers and Clients: Critical Issues in Interviewing and Counseling, (with Robert Dinerstein and Ellmann, Gunning, and Kruse, Thomson/West, Oct. 2009); Offspring and Bodies: Dependency and Vulnerability in the Constitutional Jurisprudence of Reproductive Rights, 77 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. (2009); Introduction, "Comparative Family Law: What is the Global Family? Family Law in Decolonization, Modernization and Globalization" (19 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy, and the Law 449, 2011);

William Snape

Fellow in Environmental Law, Practitioner in Residence
Environmental Law

Professor Snape teaches courses on environmental advocacy and research. Snape also serves as senior counsel to the Center for Biological Diversity with emphasis on global warming, endangered species, and public lands conservation. He is vice chair of the American Bar Association Trial and Insurance Practice section, chairman emeritus of the Board for the Endangered Species Coalition, and a member of U.S. President's Trade and Environment Committee. He has a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and a JD from George Washington University.

Publications: No Reason to Wait: How the Clean Air Act Could Combat GlobalWarming Now (Congressional Report, June 2009); State Endangered Species Acts, in Endangered Species Act: Law, Policy, and Perspectives (with Susan George, Donald C. Bauer & Wm. Robert Irvin eds., ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources, 2010). "Should Obama Open Arctic Waters to Drilling?" (National Journal Expert Blog, Oct. 2011); "Was Obama right or wrong to delay the Keystone XL oil pipeline?" (National Journal Expert Blog, Nov. 2011);

David Snyder

Professor of Law
International and Comparative Commercial Law

Professor Snyder is director of the Business Law Program. He graduated summa cum laude from Tulane University Law School in 1991, and he has been a professor of law at Tulane, Indiana University in Bloomington, and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. He has also been a visiting professor at the law schools of Boston University and the College of William and Mary and has taught at the University of Paris 2 (Panth��on-Assas), the University of Paris 10 (Nanterre La D��fense), and the University of Mainz (Germany). After graduating from law school, Snyder served as clerk to the Hon. John M. Duh�� Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, and subsequently joined the D.C. firm of Hogan & Hartson (now Hogan Lovells). Professor Snyder's teaching and research interests are primarily in contracts and commercial law, including their international and comparative aspects. He was chair of the Section on Contracts of the Association of American Law Schools (2005-2006) and is an elected member of the American Law Institute and the International Academy of Comparative Law. He has written numerous articles and book chapters published in the United States and abroad, is editing a volume on comparative law (Springer-Verlag, forthcoming 2011), and is writing a book on international sales (under contract with Oxford University Press, publication expected 2012).

Publications: Hunting Promissory Estoppel, in Mixed Jurisdictions Compared (Vernon Valentine Palmer & Elspeth Christie Reid eds., Edinburgh University Press, 2009); Co-editor, General Reports of the XVIIIth Congress of the International Academy of Comparative Law / Rapports G��n��raux du XVIII��me Congr��s de l'Acad��mie Internationale de Droit Compar�� (Springer-Verlag, 2012); co-author, "Comparative Law: Problems and Prospects" (American University International Law Review, vol. 26, 4th ed., 2012); co-editor, "Conditions" and "Breach" (Contracts: Cases and Doctrine, Randy E. Barnett, Aspen Casebook Series / Wolters Kluwer Law & Business, 5th ed. 2012);

Michael Tigar

Research Professor of Law
Constitutional Law, French Legal System, Criminal Law and Procedure, International Human Rights

Professor Tigar holds expertise in constitutional law, the Supreme Court, the French legal system, criminal law and procedure, and international human rights. Tigar represented Terry Nichols in the Oklahoma City bombing trial. He has argued seven cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and more than 100 appellate cases. Tigar has written extensively about litigation, aspects of trial practice, criminal law, the death penalty, and the role of the criminal defense lawyer. Throughout his career, he has been active in pro bono cases, the American Bar Association, continuing legal education programs, and international human rights. During the apartheid period, he went to South Africa to train black lawyers. He has a BA and a JD from University of California, Berkeley.

Publications: Co-edited, with Angela J. Davis, Trial Stories (Foundation Press, 2007); Thinking About Terrorism: The Threat to Civil Liberties in Times of National Emergency (ABA, 2007).

Stephen Vladeck

Professor of Law
National Security Law, International Criminal Law, Immigration Law, Federal Courts and Jurisdiction

Professor Vladeck is associate dean for scholarship. He is a nationally recognized expert on the role of the federal courts in the war on terrorism. He was part of the legal team that successfully challenged the Bush Administration's use of military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld. Vladeck has also drafted reports on related issues for a number of organizations, including the First Amendment Center, the Constitution Project, and the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security. He is a senior editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy. Prior to joining the law school faculty, he clerked for the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for the Honorable Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Vladeck has a BA from Amherst College and a JD from Yale Law School.

Publications: Book review, The Long War, the Federal Courts, and the Necessity/Legality Paradox, 43 U. Rich. L. Rev. 893 (2009); Brief of Legal Historians and Experts on Habeas Corpus as Amici Curiae in Support of the Petition for Certiorari, Kiyemba v. Obama ("Kiyemba II"), No. 09-581 (U.S. filed Dec. 14, 2009); Brief of Law Professors as Amici Curiae in Support of the Petition for Certiorari, Va. Office for Prot. & Advocacy v. Reinhard, No. 09-529 (U.S. filed Dec. 2, 2009); Brief for Non-Governmental Organizations as Amici Curiae in Support of Appellees, al Maqaleh v. Gates, No. 09-5265 (D.C. Cir. filed Nov. 6, 2009); AEDPA, Saucier, and the Stronger Case for Rights-First Constitutional Adjudication, 32 Seattle University Law Review 595 (2009); The Case Against National Security Courts, Williamette Law Review, vol. 45, pp. 505 (2009); The Problem of Jurisdictional Non-Precedent, 44 Tulsa Law Review 587 (2009); Boumediene's Quiet Theory: Access to Courts and the Separation of Powers, 84 Notre Dame L. Rev. 2107 (2009); Common-Law Habeas and the Separation of Powers, 95 Iowa L. Rev. Bull. 39 (2010); Terrorism and International Criminal Law After the Military Commissions Acts, 8 Santa Clara J. Int'l L. 101 (2010); National Security and Bivens After Iqbal, 14 Lewis & Clark L. Rev. 255 (2010); The Unreviewable Executive: Kiyemba, Maqaleh, and the Obama Administration, 27 Const. Comment. 603 (2010); The Laws of War as a Constitutional Limit on Military Jurisdiction, 4 J. Nat'l Sec. L. & Pol'y 295 (2010); Terrorism Trials and the Article III Courts After Abu Ali, 88 Tex. L. Rev. 1501 (2010); Common-Law Habeas and the Separation of Powers, 95 Iowa L. Rev. Bull. 39 (2010); Justice Jackson, the Memory of Internment, and the Rule of Law After the Bush Administration, in When Governments Break the Law: The Rule of Law and the Prosecution of the Bush Administration 183 (Austin Sarat & Nasser Hussain eds., 2010); Brief of Law Professors as Amici Curiae in Support of the Petitioner, Va. Office for Prot. & Advocacy v. Stewart, No. 09-529 (U.S. filed Aug. 31, 2010); State Sovereign Immunity and the Roberts Court, 5 Charleston L. Rev. 99 (2010); Brief of Federal Jurisdiction Professors as Amici Curiae in Support of Respondents, AT&T Mobility, LCC v. Conception, No. 09-893 (U.S. filed Oct. 6, 2010); Is "National Security Law" Inherently Paradoxical?, Nat'l Sec. L. Brief (Fall 2010); Petition for a Writ of Certiorari, Mohammed v. Obama, No. 10M51 (U.S. filed Nov. 5, 2010); The New Habeas Revisionism, 124 Harv. L. Rev. 941 (2011), reviewing Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire (Paul D. Halliday, 2010); Brief of Professors of Federal Jurisdiction as Amici Curiae in Support of the Appellant, Virginia ex rel. Cuccinelli v. Sebelius, No. 11-1057 (4th Cir. filed Mar. 7, 2011); brief of Professors of Federal Jurisdiction as Amici Curiae in Support of Defendants-Appellants, Florida ex rel. Bondi v. U.S. Dep't of Health & Hum. Servs., No. 11-11021 (11th Cir. filed Apr. 11, 2011). "Brief of Former HHS Officials as Amici Curiae in Support of Respondents, Douglas v. Indep. Living Ctr. of S. Cal., Inc., No. 09-958" (U.S. 2011); "Brief of Professors of Constitutional Law and Federal Jurisdiction as Amici Curiae in Support of Plaintiffs-Appellants, Lebron v. Rumsfeld, No. 11-6480" (4th Circuit, 2011); "Review of The Rights of the People: How Our Search for Safety Invades our Liberties" ("Washington Independent Review of Books," 2011); "The Supreme Court, the War on Terrorism, and the Separation of Powers" (Human Rights, 2011); "Why Klein Still Matters: Congressional Deception and the War on Terrorism" (vol. 5, 2011); "The Supreme Court, Original Habeas, and the Paradoxical Virtue of Obscurity" (vol. 97, 2011); "The Passive-Aggressive Virtues" (111 Columbia Law Review Sidebar 122, 2011); "Killing Medicaid the California Way" (with Bruce C. Vladeck, New York Times, Oct. 2011); "The D.C. Circuit After Boumediene" (42 Seton Hall Law Review 1451 , 2011); "Insular Thinking about Habeas" (97 Iowa Law Review 16, 2012); "Douglas and the Fate of Ex Parte Young" (122 Yale Law Journal Online 13, 2012); "Normalizing Guantanamo" (vol. 49, Georgetown University Law Center, 2012);

Perry Wallace

Professor of Law
Corporate Law and Finance, Environmental Law, International Arbitration

Professor Wallace is director of the JD/MBA dual degree program at the law school and also serves on the board of the school's Center on International Commercial Arbitration. He is a member of the National Panel of Arbitrators, National Association of Securities Dealers Dispute Resolution, and the Board of Directors of the Environmental Working Group. He has written many chapters, articles, and scholarly works on environmental issues, corporate governance, and other issues. Wallace has a BE from Vanderbilt University and a JD from Columbia University.

Publications: Climate Change, Fiduciary Duty, and Corporate Disclosure: Are Things Heating up in the Boardroom?, 26 Virginia Environmental Law Journal 293 (2008).

Lindsay Wiley

Assistant Professor of Law
Public Health Law, Torts

Professor Wiley is the faculty director of the Health Law and Justice Program. She teaches courses on torts, health law, and public health law. Her current research focuses on access to health care and healthy conditions in the United States and globally. She also works on various law and policy issues at the intersection of public health, food systems, and environmental change. Prior to joining the faculty, Wiley was the Global Health Law Program director at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University. She has also worked at the Center for Law and the Public's Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; the American Society for Law, Medicine and Ethics; and Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman, LLC. She received her AB and JD from Harvard, where she served on the Harvard Law Review, and her MPH from Johns Hopkins.

Publications: International Response to Climate Change: An Agenda for Global Health, 302 J. Am. Med. Assn. 1218 (with Lawrence O. Gostin, 2009); Moving Global Health Law Upstream: A Critical Appraisal of Global Health Law as a Tool for Health Adaptation to Climate Change, 22 Geo. Intl. Envtl. L. Rev. 439 (2010); Mitigation/Adaptation and Health: Health Policymaking in the Global Response to Climate Change and Implications for Other Upstream Determinants of Health, 38 J. L. Med & Ethics 629 (2010); Assessing the Impact of Federal Law on Public Health Preparedness, 4 St. Louis U. J. Health L. & Pol. 155 (with Benjamin E. Berkman and Susan C. Kim, 2010); Natural Disasters and Global Health, in The Law of Adaptation to Climate Change: U.S. and International Aspects (Michael Gerard and Katrina F. Kuh, eds., forthcoming 2011). "Rethinking the New Public Health" (69 Wash & Lee L. Rev. 207, 2012).

Paul Williams

Rebecca I. Grazier Professor of Law and International Relations
Public International Law, International Peace Negotiations, Post-Conflict Constitutions

Professor Williams directs the joint JD/MA Program in International Relations. He is co-founder and executive director of the International Law and Policy Group, a nonprofit group that provides pro bono legal assistance to states and governments involved in peace negotiations, post-conflict constitutions drafting, and war crimes prosecutions. During the course of his legal practice, Williams has assisted more than a dozen states and governments in major international peace negotiations and advised 15 governments across Europe, Africa, and Asia on issues of state recognition, self-determination, state succession, drafting and implementation of post-conflict constitutions, and border and sea demarcation. Williams is a leading scholar on peace negotiations and post-conflict constitutions and a sought-after international law and policy analyst. He has a BA from University of California, Davis, JD from Stanford, and Ph.D. from University of Cambridge.

Publications: Saddam on Trial: Understanding and Debating the Iraqi High Tribunal; What Will Ramsey Clark's Participation Mean for the Saddam Hussein Trial? (with Brianne McGonigle); Should the IHT Engage in Plea Bargaining? (with Brianne McGonigle); A Turning Point in the Saddam Trial, Saddam's Admission: I Am Responsible (with Brianne McGonigle); Humanitarian Intervention Post 9/11, Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law (Spring 2008); The Responsibility to Protect and International Law (Journal of The Hague Academy of International Law, spring 2008); The Case for Federalism in Iraq (American University Journal of International Law, Nov. 2008); Lawfare: A War Worth Fighting, (Case Western Journal of International Law, 2011); Negotiating the Darfur Ceasefire (with M.T. Simpson, chapter in The Monopoly of Force, National Defense University, 2011); International Law in Times of Crisis: The Role of the Department of State Legal Advisor (with Michael Scharf, Cambridge University Press 2010).

Richard Wilson

Professor of Law
International Human Rights Law, International Aspects of Terrorism; Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; Asylum Law

Professor Wilson is founding director of the law school's International Human Rights Law Clinic. Wilson began his legal career as a public defender in Illinois and was director of the Defender Division at the National Legal Aid and Defender Association in Washington from 1980-1985. He taught at CUNY Law School in New York City from 1985-1989. He has lived or consulted in several Latin American countries and has lectured or consulted in the United States, Eastern and Western Europe, and Asia. During the past year, he was a visiting scholar at the University of Utrecht and a fellow at the American Society of International Law. Wilson presented three cases at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in San Jos��, Costa Rica, and authored friend-of-court briefs for the European Union in the U.S. Supreme Court, successfully arguing that international law prohibits capital punishment for juveniles and for persons with mental retardation. Wilson and clinic students represented three detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in federal court, in military commission proceedings, and in the Obama interagency Task Force. Wilson is president of the Board of Directors of the World Organization for Human Rights USA. Wilson has a BA from DePauw University and a JD from the University of Illinois.

Publications: Portions of A Long Strange Trip: Guantanamo and the Scarcity of International Law, in The Guantanamo Lawyers: Inside A Prison Outside the Law (Mark Denbeaux ed., 2009); Western Europe: Last Holdout in the Worldwide Acceptance of Clinical Legal Education, 10 German Law Review 359 (2009); book review, Dinah Shelton, Regional Protection of Human Rights, 32 Human Rights Quarterly 227 (2010); A Brief Reflection on the Stages of the Clinic Year: Group Process with Existentialist Roots (SSRN, Oct. 2010); The Role of Clinical Legal Education in Achieving the Millennium Development Goals (International Legal Resource Center, ABA and the UN Development Program for the Millennium Development Goals Summit, Sept. 2010); Clinical Legal Education in Dutch Legal Culture: Clashes of Tradition, Tolerance, and Progress in Global Law's Capital (SSRN, Oct. 2010); The Role of Practice in Legal Education, General Report for the 18th International Congress on Comparative Law, Washington, D.C., October 2010. "Teaching International Law: Lessons from Clinical Education" (American Society of International Law, 2011); "The Role of Practice in Legal Education" (General Report of the 18th International Congress of Comparative Law, Karen B. Brown & David V. Snyder, eds, 2012); "Practical Training in Law in the Netherlands: Big Law Model or Clinical Model, and the Call of Public Interest" (Utrecht Law Review, 2012);