Report on Sessions of the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights

OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8
Doc. 35(English)
March 19, 1964

Original: Spanish



INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

REPORT ON THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED

DURING ITS SEVENTHSSESSION

October 7 to 25, 1963


PAN AMERICAN UNION

General Secretariat, Organization of American States

Washington, D. C.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Organization of the Seventh Session 4

Opening Date and Length of Session 4

Members of the Commission and their Participation in the Session 6

Meetings and Documents 6

Secretariat 7

II. Agenda 8

III. Report Prepared by the Secretariat on the Work Accomplished by the Commission During its Sixth Session 9

IV. Report of the Executive Secretary on the Activities of the Secretariat Between the Sixth and Seventh Sessions of the Commission 9

Violations of Human Rights in American Countries 10

Report of the Subcommittee 10

The Case of Paraguay 11

The Case of Cuba 12

The Case of Nicaragua 12

The Case of Haiti 13

The Case of the Dominican Republic 15

Examination of the Situation Regarding Human Rights in Other American Countries 15

Ecuador 15

Guatemala 16

Honduras 16

VI. Situation of Political Refugees in America 17

VII. Activities Related to the General Work Program 18

Draft Convention on Freedom of Expression, Information,

and Investigation 18

Part II of the Report "The Relationship Between the Respect for Human Rights and the Effective Exercise of Representative Democracy" 25

Part II of the Report "The Right of Suffrage in America" 25

Draft Report on the General Application of the "State of Siege" 25

Lectures Delivered by Members of the Commission 26

VIII. Other Decisions and Conclusions of the Commission 27

National Committees on Human Rights 27

Fellowship Program 27

Observers at Sessions of the Commission 28

Communications to the Governments 28

Communication to the Chairman of the Council 28

Date and Place of the Eighth Session 29

Closing of the Seventh Session 29

Appendix 31

INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

REPORT ON THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED

DURING ITS SEVENTH SESSION

OCTOBER 7 TO 25, 1963

I. ORGANIZATION OF THE SEVENTH SESSION

A. Opening Date and Length of Session

1. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights held its Seventh Session between October 7 and 25, 1963, in Santiago, Chile. In accordance with the decision adopted at its Sixth Session, and pursuant to Article ll.c of its Statute, the Commission moved its headquarters to Santiago, Chile, where it held its meetings at the Hotel Crillon. The opening and closing meetings were held in the Salon de Honor of the University of Chile.

2. As mentioned at the end of the report, the Secretary General of the Organization, Dr. José A. Mora, attended the closing meeting of the session.

3. The subcommittee, created to consider communications or claims addressed to the Commission, and to make pertinent recommendations thereon, met in Santiago on October 2, 3, and 4.

4. The Commission held its first meeting on October 7, for the purpose of considering the draft agenda prepared by the subcommittee. This draft agenda was approved by the Commission.

At the second meeting, held on October 8, the Chairman, Professor Manuel Bianchi, addressed a few words to the members of the Commission and welcomed the new member, Dr. Daniel Hugo Martins, whose presence he said was particularly gratifying, since this was the first time that all seven members of the Commission had met together.

5. The inaugural meeting took place in the Salon de Honor of the University of Chile at 7 P.M. on October 8.

Present as honored guests were the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Chile, Mr. Enrique Ortuzar Escobar; the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Chile, Mr. Osvaldo Illanes Benitez; and the Assistant Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Pedro Daza. Also present were the following Ambassadors accredited to the Government of Chile: Mr. Charles W. Cole of the United States, Mr. Gustavo Ortiz Hernan of Mexico, Mr. Isaac Felipe Azofeita of Costa Rica, and Mr. Alberto Nogués of Paraguay, as well as various other members of the diplomatic missions accredited to the Government of Chile by the American republics.

6. The Chairman of the Commission, Professor Manuel Bianchi, called the meeting to order. He emphasized the importance of the Commission's meeting in Santiago, at a time when the democracy of the hemisphere was beset by tragedy, and said that the Comm ion would use all its powers to attend to the complaints that had been or might be received in connection with violations of human rights. After introducing each of the members of the Commission, the Chairman declared the Seventh Session open. 7. An address of welcome to the Commission was delivered by the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Chile, Mr. Enrique Ortuzar Escobar. In his address the Minister pointed out "that the violation of human rights in one country constitutes an offense against humanity. The dignity of the individual, which is the mark of the spirit that characterizes his nature as a rational being, should be worthy of the deepest respect of those who govern." The Minister further stated that "no reason, motive, or circumstance can justify or excuse the violation of human rights; nor can the quite respectable principle of nonintervention serve as a pretext for committing crimes that bring dishonor to all humanity." The Foreign Minister concluded by declaring it to be the compelling duty of the Commission to find "suitable legal formulas to guarantee to all people the right of man and his children to life, justice, and freedom." (OEA/Ser. L./V/II.8, Doc. 11, October 8, 1963).

8. Dr. Gabino Fraga, Vice Chairman of the Commission thanked the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Chile for his remarks, and gave an account of the activities and aims of the Commission. He said that the work of the Commission had only begun. "There is a long road still to travel," said Dr. Fraga, "and a road filled with obstacles and unpleasantness; but we the members are motivated by a great faith, because we believe we know our peoples in their poverty and in their greatness, in oppression and in freedom, and we know that they, all of them, have a common purpose, that of unfailing respect for human dignity and for the rights that are essential to the achievement of justice and the welfare of men and of peace among nations, and as the great Liberator said, it is matter of 'sister states, all interested in one sacred purpose: freedom.'" (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 9, October 8, 1963)

9. At 11 a.m. on Tuesday, October 8, the Commission was received by the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Chile, Mr. Enrique Ortuzar Escobar. On the same day the Commission paid a visit to the Rector of the University of Chile, Mr. Eugenio Gonzalez. On Wednesday, October 9, the Commission called upon the President of the Senate, the Mayor of Santiago, and the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

The President of the Republic, Mr. Jorge Alessandri Rodriguez, received the Commission on October 25 at 10:00 a.m.

B. Members of the Commission and their Participation in the Session

10. The Commission is composed of the following members:

Name Nationality

Mrs. Angela Acuna de Chacon Costa Rica

Prof. Manuel Bianchi Gundian Chile

Dr. Gonzalo Escudero Ecuador

Dr. Gabino Fraga Mexico

Dr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl El Salvador

Dr. Daniel Hugo Martins Uruguay

Dr. Durward V. Sandifer United States

All of the members attended the Seventh Session.

Meetings and Documents

11. During the course of the Seventh Session the Commission held nineteen meetings.

12. The Secretariat prepared summary minutes for these meetings, which are restricted for the exclusive use of the members.

13. In conformity with Article 34 of the Regulations, the Secretariat prepared a list of the communications or claims received prior to this session, as well as those that were received during its course, in each case attaching a resumé of the contents. This list of communications or claims was compiled in chronological order and according to the countries to which reference is made. (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 4, September 16, 1963, Rev.).

14. In compliance with the decision reached by the Commission during the Sixth Session, the Secretariat prepared a draft report on the situation of human rights in Haiti, which served as a basis for the report that the Commission published on this subject. (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 5, October 21, 1963).

15. The Secretariat also prepared a draft report on the general application of the "State of Siege," which, after consideration by the Commission, was turned over to Dr. Daniel Hugo Martins in order that he, as rapporteur, might prepare a study on the subject to be presented to the Commission at its Eighth Session (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 6, September 17, 1963).

16. The Secretariat also prepared a study entitled: Background on the topic, "Comparative Study of the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the corresponding texts from the constitutions of the American states." (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 2, August 1, 1963).

D. Secretariat

17. The Commission was provided with the technical and administrative services of its Secretariat, composed of the Executive Secretary, Dr. Luis Reque, and Dr. Alvaro Gomez, an official of the Secretariat. Cooperation was also furnished by the Pan American Union Office in Santiago, Chile, under the direction of Mr. Ramon de Lartundo. Several press releases were issued in order to inform the public of the work being done by the Commission during this session.

II. AGENDA

18. At its first meeting, held on October 7, the Commission adopted the following agenda for the Seventh Session:

1. Report prepared by the Secretariat on the work accomplished by the Commission during its Sixth Session.

2. Report of the Executive Secretary on the activities of the Secretariat between the Sixth and Seventh Session.

3. Violations of human rights in American countries.

a. Report of the Subcommittee regarding the communications or

claims received

b. The case of Paraguay

c. The case of Cuba

d. The case of Nicaragua

e. The case of Haiti

f. The case of the Dominican Republic

4. General work program:

a. Draft "Convention on Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation," presented by Ambassador Gonzalo Escudero

b. Part II of the Report, "The Relationship Between the Respect for Human Rights and the Effective Exercise of Representative Democracy," presented by Professor Durward V. Sandifer

c. Part II of the Report, "The Right of Suffrage in America," presented by Professor Manuel Bianchi, Chairman of the Commission

d. Draft report on the general application of the "State of Siege," prepared by the Secretariat of the Commission

5. National committees on human rights

6. Fellowship program. Report of the Secretariat

7. Observers at sessions of the Commission

8. Communications to the governments and to the Council of the Organization of American States

9. Date and place of the Eighth Session

10. Other matters.

III. REPORT PREPARED BY THE SECRETARIAT ON THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED BY THE COMMISSION DURING ITS SIXTH SESSION

19. At the second meeting, held on October 8, the Executive Secretary presented the report on the work accomplished by the Commission during its Sixth Session (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.7, Doc. 28, August 15,1963). This report summarizes the work carried out between April 16 and May 8, 1963, during the aforesaid Sixth Session, and contains an account of the activities of the Commission with respect to violations of human rights in American countries, especially in Paraguay, Nicaragua, Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. With reference to the three last-named countries the above-mentioned report records approval of the report on the situation regarding political prisoners and their families in Cuba, the request of the Commission to the Government of Haiti for its consent to the holding of part of the Sixth Session in that country, and the visit of the Commission to the Dominican Republic motivated by a complaint signed by various political groups in the Dominican Republic, alleging violations of human rights by the police of the country.

20. That report also contains an account of the work carried out by the Commission under the General Work Program; agreements reached with respect to amending the Statute and Regulations; the preliminary draft "Convention on freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation," presented by Ambassador Gonzalo Escudero; Part II of the Report, "The Right of Suffrage in America," presented by Professor Manuel Bianchi, Chairman of the Commission; Part II of the Report, "The Relationship between the Respect for Human Rights and the Effective Exercise of Representative Democracy," prepared by Professor Durward V. Sandifer; as well as matters regarding the Fellowship Program, National Committees on Human Rights, and other decisions of the Commission.

IV. REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY ON THE ACTIVITIES

OF THE SECRETARIAT BETWEEN THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH SESSIONS OF THE COMMISSION

21. At the second meeting, the Commission considered the report presented by the Executive Secretary on the activities of the Secretariat between the Sixth and Seventh Sessions. (OEA/Ser.L/V/11.8, Doc. 10, October 10, 1963)This document contains an account of the work done by the Secretariat in compliance with the decisions taken by the Commission at its Sixth Session, namely. the preparation of the revised text of Regulations adopted in 1960 with the amendments adopted by the Commission during its sessions of 1961 and 1962; the processing by the secretariat of the communications or claims received between the Sixth and Seventh Sessions in accordance with the procedure established in the Regulations of the Commission, as well as requests for information on violations of human rights sent to various American governments in compliance with Article 34 of the Regulations of the Commission; the preparation of the draft report on the situation regarding human rights in Haiti on the basis of the communications or claims received by the Commission on that subject; handling of requests for information submitted by non-governmental organizations on the procedure to follow in accrediting observers to meetings of the Commission; preparation of the document entitled: Background on the topic "Comparative Study of the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the corresponding texts from the constitutions of the American states;" collaboration extended by the Secretariat to Ambassador Gonzalo Escudero in the preparation of the third report on "Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation;" preparation of the draft report on the general application of the "state of Siege;" and, finally, work in connection with the fellowship program, which was planned to begin in March 1964, with the holding of a seminar on human rights at the Instituto de Derecho Comparado de México.

22. The report was approved without change and the Commission formally expressed its pleasure with the manner in which the Secretariat had complied with the instructions and requests that were given to it.

V. VIOLATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN AMERICAN COUNTRIES

A. Report of the Subcommittee

23. The Subcommittee is composed of three members of the Commission,

namely:

Chairman: Dr. Manuel Bianchi

Members: Dr. Gonzalo Escudero

Dr. Durward V. Sandifer

24. In accordance with provisions of the Regulations, the subcommittee met one week prior to the opening of the session to make a preliminary study of the communications or claims addressed to the Commission, and to prepare a draft Agenda of the Seventh Session.

25. At the conclusion of its discussions, the subcommittee prepared a report (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 8, October 4, 1963), which was submitted to the Commission for consideration.

26. The Commission considered the report of the subcommittee at the second, third, and thirteenth meetings, held on October 8, 9, and 18, respectively. The Commission approved the report of the subcommittee in principle at the third meeting, but decided to give the members time in which to make observations with respect to the recommendations contained in the report. The Commission, on the other hand, examined at that meeting the communications or claims that the Subcommittee recommended for examination by the full Commission.

The Commission again took up the report of the subcommittee at the thirteenth meeting and, since no observations were made on that document, the Commission endorsed the recommendations drawn up by the subcommittee and instructed the Secretariat to handle the communications or claims contained in the report in the manner recommended.

27. At the seventeenth meeting, held on October 24, 1963, the Commission considered Addendum 3 to Document 4, referring to the communications or claims received after the opening of this session. The Commission reached a number of conclusions with regard to these and instructed the Secretariat to handle them according to these decisions. (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 4, September 16, 1963, Rev.).

B. The Case of Paraguay

28. During the course of the Seventh Session the Commission continued its consideration of the situation of human rights in Paraguay.

At the fourth meeting, held on October 10, the Chairman informed the Commission with regard to the instructions which the Commission had given to him at the Sixth Session to the effect that he take the necessary steps with the Ambassadors of Paraguay in Washington and Santiago to secure the consent of the Paraguayan Government for a visit by the Commission to that country. The Commission decided at that same meeting to extend its authorization to the Chairman to continue his conversations with the Ambassador of Paraguay in Santiago, Chile.

29. At the thirteenth meetings held on October 18, after the Chairman again reported to the Commission on the results of his recent conversations with the Paraguayan Ambassador to Chile in regard to the request for consent, the Commission decided: a. to continue examining the situation of human rights in Paraguay at the Eighth Session; b. not to request permission from the Paraguayan Government to visit that country during the Seventh Session; c. to authorize the Chairman and the Executive Secretary to request and obtain the information they deem pertinent in order that the Commission may take a decision on this subject at the next session.

30. At the sixteenth meeting, held on October 23, the Commission considered the notes from the Government of Paraguay dated September 30 and October 5, 1963, sent in reply to the requests from the Commission for information regarding alleged violations of human rights in that country. The Commission decided to instruct the Secretariat to include these notes as a background document in the case of Paraguay.

C. The Case of Cuba

31. During the Seventh Session the Commission continued to concern itself with the situation of human rights in Cuba, particularly with reference to the situation of political prisoners.

32. As a result of the numerous communications or claims received regarding serious and repeated violations of human rights in Cuba and the maltreatment to which political prisoners are subjected in that country, the Commission, at its fourth meeting, held on October 10, entrusted the Secretariat with the preparation of a draft additional report on the Cuban case, to be considered at the next session.

33. At the seventh meeting, held on October 14, the Commission granted a hearing to the members of the Comision Cubana por los Derechos Humanos (Cuban Committee for Human Rights), who had requested such hearing for the purpose of giving to the Commission more details on their written denunciations of violations of human rights in their country.

D. The Case of Nicaragua

34. The Commission considered the situation regarding human rights in Nicaragua at its fourth and fifth meetings, held on October 10 and 11, respectively. First of all, the Commission took cognizance of the statements of former President Luis Somoza, of Nicaragua, that appeared in "Diario de las Américas" in July 1963, In these declarations, President Somoza, referring to the denial by the Government of Nicaragua to the Commission to visit that country, stated that the Commission's attitudes had been taken "because of political reasons, since some members of the Commission on Human Rights are personal enemies of mine, and personal enemies of my party. Why? For reasons that are too long to go into in this program, but it is that some of them have been members of a communist organization for many years, since this Central American battle did not begin yesterday, it began many years ago, in 1948." The Commission unanimously supported the position assumed by its Chairman and reported in a press release issued in Washington and Santiago, Chile, on July 30, 1963. In that press release the Chairman of the Commission, Dr. Manuel Bianchi, included the following statement: "As the Commission is just now in recess, its Chairman considers it his inescapable duty to deny categorically, on behalf of the Commission, the validity of the remarks made by Mr. Somoza. It is not the first time that the tactics of Senator Somoza have been used to levy accusations against international agencies that are working for representative democracy and human rights."

35. With respect to the situation of human rights in Nicaragua, the Commission decided to transmit to the government of that country the pertinent parts of the communications or claims received regarding violations of human rights and to request the corresponding information, in accordance with the procedure established in the Regulations. The Commission likewise decided to continue the restricted character of the document entitled "Documents and Information Concerning the Request for the Consent of the Government of Nicaragua." (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.6, Doc. 17, February 14, 1963).

36. At the sixteenth meeting, held on October 23, 1963, the Commission took cognizance of a note from the Government of Nicaragua, dated September 21, 1963, replying to a request for information sent by the Commission in August of that year. Since the Government of Nicaragua offered in that note to send the information requested as soon as possible, the Commission decided to consider this matter at its next session.

E. The Case of Haiti

37. During the course of the Sixth Session, the Commission instructed the Secretariat to draft a report on the situation regarding human rights in Haiti. The Secretariat prepared a document in accordance with these instructions (Doc. 5, September 7, 1963), which it submitted to the Commission for consideration. That document contained an account of the activities carried out by the Commission in the Haitian case and an examination into the situation regarding human rights in that country, for which it took as a basis the claims or complaints addressed to the Commission and the information furnished by the Haitian Government.

38. The Commission considered the draft report prepared by the Secretariat, at its sixth and fourteenth meetings, held on October 14 and 21, respectively. At the former meeting, the Commission proceeded to make a general examination of the draft report, and appointed Dr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl as rapporteur of this matter, in order that he might recommend the changes he deemed appropriate. The members were requested to advise the rapporteur of any observations they wished to make regarding that document. 39. At the fourteenth meeting, the Commission examined in detail the draft prepared by the Secretariat, together with the observations and recommendations made by the rapporteur. At the same meeting the Commission unanimously approved the report on the situation of human rights in Haiti, and decided to make it available to the governments through the Council of the Organization.

40. The report approved by the Commission divided into 3 parts: an introduction, in which the reasons are set forth that prompted the Commission, in accordance with Article 9.c of its Statute, to prepare the document; a chapter giving background, including the various communications exchanged by the Commission and the Government of Haiti; and a chapter on the situation of human rights in Haiti, in which reference is made to the provisions of the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, to the communications or claims regarding violations of human rights in Haiti received by the Commission, and to the information furnished by the Haitian Government.

41. In the aforementioned report, the Commission expressly mentioned the following facts:

1. That the requests for information sent to the Government of Haiti by the Commission referred to serious and repeated violations of human rights in that country;

2. That the information supplied by the Government of Haiti did not relate to the complaints transmitted by the Commission in their entirety;

3. That, in some cases, the information supplied to the Commission by the Government of Haiti was incomplete, while in others the Government merely denied that human rights were violated in Haiti, but without supplying information on the specific complaints transmitted by the Commission;

4. That, on two occasions - September 26, 1962, and May 7, 1963 -, the Commission, in accordance with Article ll.c of its Statute, requested permission from the Government of Haiti to go to that country to study the situation regarding human rights;

5. That, on both occasions, the Government of Haiti refused the Commission the permission it requested, on the grounds that its visit might be interpreted as a form of interference in the internal affairs of Haiti; and

6. That, on both occasions, the Commission made it expressly clear that it respected the sovereignty of Haiti, but that it was empowered, by Article ll.c of its Statute to visit the territory of any American state, with the prior consent of its government.

F. The Case of the Dominican Republic

42. Having received numerous communications or claims with respect to serious and repeated violations of human rights in the Dominican Republic, the Commission decided at the first meeting to include the study of the case of the Dominican Republic on the agenda of the Seventh Session.

43. The Commission began its study of the case at the sixth meeting, held on October 14. It first of all considered the communications or claims that had been addressed to it regarding violations of human rights in that country. (OEA/Ser.L/V/11.8, Doc. 8, October 4). In relation to these, the Commission decided to follow the procedure recommended to it by the subcommittee, that is, to transcribe and send to the Dominican Government the pertinent parts of the communications or claims that contained concrete denunciations of violations of human rights, and to request that Government to send the information it considered pertinent. The Commission decided to adopt the same procedure for the specific communications or claims that were received during the course of the Seventh Session.

44. At the same Meeting, the Commission considered the cable reply sent by the Dominican Government in response to the request for information about violations of human rights in that country that had been transmitted to it. The Commission instructed the Secretariat to prepare a background document based upon the information received, so that this might be considered at the next session.

G. Examination of the Situation Regarding Human Rights in Other American Countries

1. Ecuador

45. The Commission considered the communications or claims that had been addressed to it on violations of human rights in Ecuador at its fourth, sixth, and seventeenth meetings, held on October 10, 14, and 24, respectively. In accordance with the provisions of its Regulations, the Commission decided to transmit to the Government of Ecuador the pertinent parts of communications regarding concrete denunciations of violations of human rights.

46. At the seventh meeting, held on October 14, the Commission granted a hearing to the leaders of the committee of Ecuadorean Exiles in Chile, who had requested it for the purpose of enlarging upon the complaint that they had presented in writing. In the course of the said hearing the Chairman of that committee referred to the situation of human rights in his country, making several concrete complaints regarding violations of these rights.

47. At the same meeting the Commission decided to transmit to the Government of Ecuador the specific facts mentioned in the denunciation made by the aforementioned committee of exiles and, on the other hand, entrusted to its Secretariat the compilation of the information sent to the Commission regarding the situation of human rights in Ecuador, so that this might be considered at the next session.

2. Guatemala

48. At the third meeting the Commission examined the situation of human rights in Guatemala. It must be pointed out that the Commission had received numerous communications and reports on concrete violations of human rights in that country. In accordance with the Regulations, the Secretariat prepared a summary of all of the denunciations received. As in the case of other countries, the Commission decided to send to the Government of Guatemala the pertinent parts of the communications and to request it to send the corresponding information.

49. At the sixteenth meeting, held on October 23, the Commission considered the information sent by the Government of Guatemala under date of August 23 and October 10, 1963, in reply to the request for such information transmitted to that government on August 19 of that year. The Commission decided to examine the situation of human rights in Guatemala at its next session, after the Secretariat prepared the background document that was entrusted to it.

3. Honduras

50. At its seventeenth meeting held on October 24, the Commission considered several communications on violations of human rights in Honduras. In accordance with Article 36 of its Regulations, the Commission agreed to request the pertinent information from the Government of Honduras regarding a communication dealing with concrete reports of violations of human rights in that country. The Government of Honduras, by cable of November 4, authorized the Commission to assign responsible representatives so that they might prove the falseness of the claims. The text of the cable is as follows:

DOCTOR MANUEL BIANCHI

INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

SANTIAGO, CHILE

REPLYING TO YOUR NOTE OF OCTOBER TWENTY-EIGHT GOVERNMENT HONDURAS AUTHORIZES THE COMMISSION TO ASSIGN RESPONSIBLE REPRESENTATIVES IN ORDER TO PROVE FALSENESS OF CLAIMS. RESPECTFULLY

JORGE FIDEL DURON

MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

On November 8, 1963, the Chairman of the Commission sent the following cable to the Government of Honduras:

HIS EXCELLENCY

JORGE FIDEL DURON

MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

TEGUCIGALPA (HONDURAS)

IN REPLY TO YOUR COURTEOUS CABLE OF NOVEMBER 4 NEITHER THE INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS NOR ITS REPRESENTATIVES CAN GO TO HONDURAS FOR THE TIME BEING DUE TO THE FACT THAT THE COMMISSION ENDED ITS SESSION OCTOBER 25 IN SANTIAGO, CHILE. ON BEHALF OF COMMISSION I WISH TO EXPRESS TO GOVERNMENT HONDURAS, THROUGH YOU, SINCERE APPRECIATION AUTHORIZATION GRANTED. VERY SINCERELY

MANUEL BIANCHI CHAIRMAN

VI. SITUATION OF POLITICAL REFUGEES IN AMERICA

51. On September 6, 1963, a refugee committee with headquarters in Madrid wrote to the Secretary General of the Organization Dr. José A. Mora, requesting the help of the Organization.

The Secretary General of the Organization sent a note to the Chairman of the Commission on September 26, requesting that the matter presented by the said committee be examined by the Commission in the course of its Seventh Session and that, at the same time, the Commission consider the possibility of making a complete study of the situation of political refugees in America, so that it might submit proposals on the subject to the governments of the member states for their consideration.

52. At the first meeting, held on October 6, the Commission considered the note of the Secretary General and the communication from the refugee committee, and agreed to take up the matter during the course of the session.

53. The Commission again considered the matter of refugees at the third meeting, held on October 9, and agreed upon the following: 1. to write to the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration, with headquarters in Geneva, informing it of the desire of the Commission that the problem raised by the refugee committee with headquarters in Madrid be given a favorable solution; and 2. to entrust the Secretariat with the preparation of a preliminary study on the situation of political refugees in America. Such a study should have as background the work that had been done in this field by the Organization of American States, the League of Nations, and the United Nations, the legislation that had been passed by the American countries to meet the problem of refugees, and the information received by the Commission with respect to this problem. The Commission decided to study the problem of refugees at its Eighth Session.

VII. ACTIVITIES RELATED TO THE GENERAL WORK PROGRAM

A. Draft Convention on Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation

54. This subject was taken up originally during the Second Session of the Commission, in April 1961, under the heading "First report on measures designed to improve implementation of rights to freedom of investigation, of opinion, and of the expression and dissemination of ideas"(OEA/Ser.L/V/II.2, Doc. 15, April 21, 1961). Since the rapporteur of this topic, Dr. Gonzalo Escudero, had suggested in the conclusions to his report the preparation of a draft convention on freedom of the press, the Commission entrusted to Dr. Escudero himself the preparation of the said draft. For the purpose of facilitating the work of the rapporteur the Secretariat prepared and published, in August 1961, a preliminary draft convention, taking as a basis for it the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Draft Convention on Freedom of Information of the United Nations, and the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

55. At the Fourth Session of the Commission, held in April 1962, the rapporteur presented a "Second Report on Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation" (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.4, Doc. 4, March 27, 1962). That report contained a preliminary draft convention comprising several introductory clauses and 25 articles referring to freedom of conscience, thought, and religion; freedom of expression through the press and other media; the right to information; facilities for receiving and disseminating information; right of correction, reply, or clarification; and freedom of investigation. The Commission recommended that its members examine the document and transmit to the Secretariat, within a period of 60 days, any comments they might wish to make regarding it.

56. The Commission continued the study of this draft at its Fifth Session, October 1962, taking into account the comments of the various members. It was agreed to request the rapporteur to prepare a new preliminary draft in the light of these comments

57. At the present session, the rapporteur of this topic, Dr. Gonzalo Escudero, prepared a "Third Report on Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation," which contained a revised draft convention on the subject. The Commission examined this matter at its seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth meetings, held on October 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18, respectively. The Commission gave careful consideration to the said revised draft, which contained a number of changes and additions. Some of the provisions of the original draft were eliminated.

At its twelfth meeting, the Commission approved the text of the "Draft Inter-American Convention on Freedom of Expression, Information, and Investigation" (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 15, October 18, 1963).

The text of the approved draft is as follows:

DRAFT INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION ON FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, INFORMATION AND INVESTIGATION

Whereas:

The Charter of the Organization of American States and the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man proclaim human rights and fundamental freedoms, as do the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights;

Among these freedoms, those of conscience, thought, religion, opinion, expression, information, and investigation are of principal importance;

The respect and protection of the aforementioned freedoms constitute one of the foundations supporting the solidarity and unity of the Hemisphere, international peace, understanding, and justice and the progress of civilization;

The freedoms of opinion, expression, information, and investigation are essential to the enjoyment of the freedom of conscience, thoughts and religion;

The exercise of these freedoms presupposes the responsibilities and obligations essential to maintain compatibility with the respect for the individual, society and its moral code, and the existence and personality of the State against whatever could disturb the peace, security, and public order;

Freedom of information comprehends both the right to transmit information on facts and ideas by any media, and the right of every person to receive such information without any limitation whatsoever;

Whoever makes use of information media assumes a grave responsibility before public opinion and has the moral duty to respect the truth; and

The attainment of the ends stated above requires these freedoms to be free of pressure or force of any kind,

The Governments of the member states of the Organization of American States have agreed to conclude the following convention.

Article I

The Contracting States, under the terms of this Convention, guarantee to the inhabitants of their respective territories the right to express their thoughts and opinions freely, as well as freedom of information and investigation.

Article II

Everyone has the right to express and freely disseminate his thoughts and opinions orally or in writing, or to employ, at his choice, printing, lithography, painting, sculpture, cartoons, engraving, the press, radio, television, films, public address systems, or any other medium utilized or useful for the exercise of this right.

The exercise of this right precludes any form of prior censorship, guarantee, or pledge.

Article III

Except as provided in Article XII, everyone shall be free to seek, receive and communicate, without governmental or other interference, information and opinions in oral, written, printed or illustrated form, or by any other method presently established or that may be established.

Article IV

No Contracting State shall regulate or control the use of or access to any means of communication in a manner that amounts to discrimination for reasons of political beliefs, race, sex, language, or religion.

Article V

The Contracting States agree to respect and enforce respect for freedom of scientific, technical, and artistic investigation and, in general. all forms of cultural investigation.

Article VI

The Contracting States undertake to respect the right to free access to official and unofficial news sources equally for all journalists and news agencies, national and foreign, provided that, with respect to the latter, they are duly accredited for the performance of their professional duties in accordance with the law of the country where they are stationed.

The Contracting States also undertake to provide them with all facilities for the fulfillment of their professional duties, fully guaranteeing their freedom of action and movement, both in gathering information and in the transmitting it inside the respective country and outside of it.

Article VII

1. The Contracting States shall grant facilities for the acquisition of newsprint and machinery and supplies for use in the dissemination of ideas, as well as the implements required for radio broadcasting, television or for dissemination by any other information medium.

2. The Contracting States shall seek the adoption of measures to permit the entry into their respective territories, free of duty and advance permits or other formalities of all kinds of books, magazines, newspapers and pamphlets that are not contrary to morality, public order, and the security of the State as well as recordings, films, and other educational material which are in accord with these same conditions.

Article VIII

No provision of this Convention shall limit the right of any Contracting State to adopt the measures required:

a. To develop its national information agencies; and

b. To prevent restrictive or monopolistic interference or agreements limiting the free flow of information and opinions.

Article IX

1. The Contracting States have the right to correct or reply to a news report or dispatch published in any of them which misrepresents the truth, or in some way impairs the dignity or prestige of the claimant State or tends to disturb the peaceful relations between the Nations of the Hemisphere.

2. Every person will have the right to correct or reply to information or opinions prejudicial to him that have been expressed via the information media by another person or entity in any contracting State.

3. The correction or reply shall be published gratuitously wherever the information which motivated it appeared, following the procedure established by law, apart from the clarification and determination of any liabilities incurred.

Article X

The Contracting States agree to introduce in their domestic legislation such amendments as may be necessary for the effective application of the provisions of this Convention, and undertake to establish penal sanctions in their laws for the criminal conduct of officials or persons who violate the provisions of those laws.

Article XI

The Contracting States undertake to transmit to the Secretary General of the Organization of American States the texts of their legislation relating to the provisions of this Convention, in order that they may be communicated to the other Contracting States.

Article XII

The exercise of the rights and freedoms established in the preceding articles implies duties and responsibilities and may therefore be subject only to such formalities, conditions or restrictions, clearly defined by law and applied in conformity therewith, as are strictly necessary in a democratic society to uphold national security, territorial integrity, public order or the prevention of crime, to prevent incitement to racial or religious strife, to protect the health, morals, reputation or rights of others, to prevent the disclosure of confidential information, or to guarantee the impartial administration of justice. In no case, however, shall such formalities, conditions or restrictions represent an abuse or distortion of power which shall prevent or restrict the legitimate exercise of such rights and freedoms.

The Contracting States may regulate for technical necessities the installation and operation of radio and television stations, and all other methods of disseminating thought, which methods, by their nature, cannot be utilized in an unrestricted manner.

Article XIII

1. In time of war or in any other grave national emergency, each Contracting State may adopt measures to suspend compliance with its obligations under this Convention, to an extent and for a duration strictly limited by the requirements of the situation.

2. Each Contracting State exercising this power shall immediately inform the Secretary General of the Organization of American States of the measures so adopted and of the reasons prompting the action. It shall also inform him of the form and duration of the application of such measures.

3 The Secretary General of the Organization of American States shall transmit this information to the other Contracting States.

Article XIV

This Convention shall neither limit nor modify more favorable provisions which, for the exercise of the rights and freedoms contained herein, are authorized in the law of any Contracting State or in any other convention to which that State may be a party. Neither shall it derogate other rights and freedoms related to those contemplated in this Convention that are recognized in the law of any Contracting State or in any other convention to which that State may be a party.

Article XV

This Convention shall be open for signature by the member states of the Organization of American States and shall be ratified by the signatory States in accordance with their respective constitutional procedures.

Article XVI

The original instrument, the English, French, Portuguese and Spanish texts of which are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Pan American Union which shall send certified copies thereof to the Governments for the purpose of ratification. The instruments of ratification shall be deposited with the Pan American Union, which shall notify the signatory Governments of such deposit.

Article XVII

This Convention shall enter into force among the ratifying States in the order in which their instruments of ratification are deposited.

Article XVIII

This Convention shall be registered with the Secretariat of the United Nations through the Pan American Union.

Article XIX

This Convention shall remain in force indefinitely, but may be denounced by any of the Contracting States upon notification given one year in advance, after which it will cease to have effect for the denouncing State, but shall remain in force as among the other Contracting States. The denunciation shall be communicated to the Pan American Union, which shall inform the other Contracting States.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned Plenipotentiaries, whose full powers have been presented and found to be in good and due form, sign the present Convention, in the name of their respective Governments, in the city of ................... on the ........... day of ..........., nineteen hundred and sixty...........

The Commission agreed to submit the Draft Convention to the consideration of the Eleventh Inter-American Conference, through the Council of the Organization. It was sent to the Council of the Organization on October 30, 1963, with a request that it be included in the item on "Human Rights" of the Agenda of the Eleventh Inter-American Conference.

B. Part II of the Report "The Relationship Between the Respect for Human Rights and the Effective Exercise of Representative Democracy"

58. At the thirteenth and fourteenth meetings, held on October 18 and 21, respectively, the Commission examined Part II of the Report "The Relationship Between the Respect for Human Rights and the Effective Exercise of Representative Democracy," presented by Dr. Durward V. Sandifer. (OEA/Ser.L/V/II5, Doc. 3, October 2, 1962). After studying the document closely the Commission decided that, before closing the Seventh Session, the members should make such observations as they deemed pertinent with respect to the report presented by Dr. Sandifer, so that the Secretariat might proceed to prepare the document on human rights and representative democracy.

It also agreed that after the aforementioned document was drafted by the Secretariat, it should be referred to the members so that they might make the necessary observations within a period of 15 days, and that at the conclusion of this period the Secretariat was authorized to publish the said document.

C. Part II of the Report "The Right of Suffrage in America"

59. At the fifteenth meeting, held on October 22, the Chairman of the

Commission, Professor Manuel Bianchi Gundian, made an oral report on the above topic.

Professor Bianchi stated that the object of Part II of his Report was to point out the progress achieved by the countries of America with respect to the right of suffrage, recalling that Part I of his Report had sought to analyze the right of suffrage according to the domestic legislation of the American countries. He further stated that Part I of his Report (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.5, Doc. 14, October 4, 1962) had already been transmitted to the governments, but that so far no information had been forthcoming on new developments in this field. He emphasized the need for official information from the governments with respect to progress achieved in the field of elections, in order that he might prepare the second report and submit it to the Commission for consideration at its next session. 60. After considering the report presented by Professor Bianchi, rapporteur of the topic, the Commission decided to request the Secretary General of the Organization to transmit the Report "The Right of Suffrage in America" to the governments of the member states, with a request that they be good enough to transmit their laws and pertinent material so that the Commission may continue its consideration of this important matter.

D. Draft Report on the General Application of the "State of Siege"

61. At the Fifth Session, held in October 1962, the Commission approved a general work program, and in connection therewith it authorized the Secretariat to prepare preliminary studies on the topics or matters included in it. In the performance of this duty the Secretariat prepared a document on the history and general application of the "State of Siege" and submitted it for consideration by the Commission at the fifteenth meeting, held on October 22.

The Commission designated Dr. Daniel Hugo Martins as rapporteur of this topic, so that, based upon the draft report prepared by the Secretariat, he might prepare a broader report and formulate the conclusions indicated for submittal to the Commission for consideration at its next session.

E. Lectures Delivered by the Members of the Commission

62. In accordance with the mandate of the Commission to promote the respect of human rights, the members of the Commission delivered a series of lectures on the various subjects of the general work program. This series of lectures was sponsored by the University of Chile, and included the following:

1. "Human Rights in the International Order" by Dr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl, in the "Valentin Letelier" Hall of the University of Chile on Friday, October 10.

2. "Human Rights and the Right of Suffrage in America" by Prof. Manuel Bianchi, in the "Valentin Letelier" Hall of the University of Chile, on Monday, October 14.

3. "The Juridical Protection of Human Rights in the field of Children Born out of Wedlock" by Mrs. Angela Acuna de Chacon, in the "Valentin Letelier" Hall of the University of Chile, Friday, October 18.

4. "The Protection of Human Rights under the Writ of Amparo" by Dr. Gabino Fraga, in the Assembly Hall of the Faculty of Law of the University of Chile, on Tuesday, October 22.

5. "Human Rights and Representative Democracy" by Prof. Durward V. Sandifer, in the School of Political and Administrative Sciences of the University of Chile, on Wednesday, October 23.

6. "The European and Inter-American Commissions on Human Rights - Similarities and Differences" by Dr. Daniel Hugo Martins, in the Assembly Hall of the Faculty of Law of the University of Chile, on Friday, October 25. The Commission entrusted its Secretariat with the preparation of a compilation of these lectures in a document for general distribution. *

* Subsequent to this Session, Dr. Gonzalo Escudero, Member of the Commission, gave a lecture in Bogota, on December 11, 1963, on "Freedom of Expression, Information and Investigation."

VIII. OTHER DECISIONS AND CONCLUSIONS OF THE COMMISSION

A. National Committees on Human Rights

63. The Commission considered the question of National Committees on Human Rights at the sixth meeting, which took place on October 14. At that meeting the Executive Secretary reported that, in compliance with the decision of the Commission at the Fifth Session (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.5, Doc. 40, February 11, 1963), the Secretariat had been establishing relations of cooperation with institutions and societies interested in human rights. The Executive Secretary also pointed out that the Commission, at the First Session, had adopted a resolution on the establishment of National Committees on Human Rights, but that until now no such committee had been established, and this despite the efforts of the Commission itself and of its Secretariat.

64. The Commission, in accordance with the information furnished by the Secretariat, decided that the National Committees on Human Rights should be established according to the terms of the resolution of October 1960, and that

the Secretariat should continue to establish relations of cooperation with institutions and organizations interested in human rights, according to the decision taken at the Fifth Session.

B. Fellowship Program

65. The Commission took up this matter at its sixth meeting, held on October 14. In the report submitted by the Secretariat on its activities between the Sixth and Seventh Sessions (OEA/Ser.L,/V/11.8, Doc. 10, October 10, 1963) reference was made to the fact that the Fellowship Program, approved by the Commission at its First Session, was planned to begin in March 1964, with a four-month course on human rights at the Instituto de Derecho Comparado de Mexico (Institute of Comparative Law, Mexico), but that this could not be carried out due to the fact that the financial situation of the Pan American Union had made it necessary to withhold the item earmarked to meet the expenses of the aforementioned course.

66. The Commission instructed its Chairman to take such steps as might be necessary with the General Secretariat of the Organization to the end that the sum withheld be utilized in carrying out the program referred to.

C. Observers at Sessions of the Commission

67. This subject was considered by the Commission at its first, second, and seventeenth meetings, held on October 7, 8, and 24, respectively. The Secretariat informed the Commission (OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 10, October 10, 1963) that a number of non-governmental organizations had expressed a desire to send observers to the meetings of the Commission; that two organizations, the B'Nai B'Rith and the World Jewish Congress, in notes sent to the Commission, had requested information on the procedure they had to follow in order to accredit observers to the session of the Commission in Santiago, Chile; and that the Secretariat had limited itself to informing these organizations that the Statute and Regulations of the Commission contained no provisions with respect to observers.

68. The Commission agreed to grant hearings to the non-governmental organizations that had requested them for the purpose of presenting plans of cooperation with the Commission, in accordance with the resolution adopted in October 1960. At the same time, the Commission entrusted to the Secretariat the preparation of a background document on the status of non-governmental organizations with other international agencies, such as the United Nations and the Council of Europe. The Commission agreed to take this subject up at its next session. At its seventeenth meeting, the Commission received representatives of the Comité de la Colectividad Israelita de Chile (Committee of the Jewish Community of Chile), who had requested an audience for the purpose of informing the Commission of their desire to maintain relations of cooperation with it and their interest in accrediting permanent observers to the sessions of the Commission. The Chairman of the Jewish Committee fully described the activities and aims of his organization and asked the Commission for permission to accredit a permanent observer to their sessions. The Chairman of the Commission, in thanking him for the cooperation offered, stated that the question of observers would be taken up at the next session of the Commission.

D. Communications to the Governments

69. In conformity with agreements reached at the third, sixth, seventh, thirteenth, and seventeenth meetings, held on October 9, 14, 18, and 24, respectively, the Commission, pursuant to Article 36 of the Regulations, wrote to the governments of some of the American countries requesting information on alleged violations of human rights in those countries.

E. Communication to the Chairman of the Council

70. As in its preceding sessions, the Commission decided at the seventeenth meeting, held on October 24, to send a note to the Chairman of the Council of the Organization of American States, Ambassador Gonzalo Facio, informing him of the work accomplished by the Commission during its Seventh Session.

F. Date and Place of the Eighth Session

71. At the sixteenth meeting, held on October 23, the Commission considered the question of a date and place for the Eighth Session.

The Commission decided to hold its Eighth Session at the Pan American Union, Washington, D. C., its permanent headquarters, early in 1964, on a date to be set by the Chairman of the Commission.

G. Closing of the Seventh Session

72. The closing of the Seventh Session took place with formal ceremonies held for that purpose in the Salon de Honor of the University of Chile at eleven o'clock on October 25. Attending this session, as guest of honor, was the Secretary General of the Organization of American States, Dr. José A. Mora.

73. The Secretary General, in the address he delivered at the closing of the Seventh Session spoke, first of all, of the work accomplished by the Commission since it was first established. In this connection he pointed out that the Commission, "since the beginning of its work, has been aware of the noble mission to which it was called, and has felt that its duty could not be limited to the simple promotion of respect for human rights, but must be equally careful that these were not violated." The Secretary General then stated that every day wider horizons were opening so that the Commission might discharge a decisive mission in the Hemisphere. In this respect he stated that the Commission must be "an instrument of collaboration, within the institutional plans of the Charter of Punta del Este, for revealing and defending the spiritual values connected with economic and social development." He then referred to the matter of political refugees and pointed out that the Commission, as advisory body of the Organization of American States in the field of human rights, could undoubtedly furnish advise on the best methods for dealing with questions of this kind. (See the text of the address of the Secretary General in Doc. OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8, Doc. 13, October 25, 1963)

74. The Chairman of the Commission, Professor Manuel Bianchi, then spoke, referring to the work done by the Commission at this session, and particularly to the reports and studies prepared by the Commission and to the number of communications and claims that had been examined. He expressed his appreciation to the University of Chile and the Government of Chile for all the facilities they had made available to the Commission for the success of its work. He referred especially to the presence of the Secretary General of the Organization at the closing meeting, with the following statement, among others: "As a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, I can testify to the collaboration that Ambassador José A. Mora has given to our agency since the very first moment in which we began our work in October 1960. This support has increased with time, and culminates today with his presence at this solemn closing meeting." Immediately thereafter, the Chairman of the Commission declared the work of the Seventh Session at an end. (The text of the address by the Chairman of the Commission is contained in Document OEA/Ser.L/V/11.8, Doc. 14. October 25, 1963)

APPENDIX

DOCUMENTS OF THE INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

(OEA/Ser.L/V)

Document Number Title

OEA/Ser.L/V/II.8 DOCUMENTS OF THE SIXTH SESSION

Doc. 1 Documentos de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, registrados por la Secretaria hasta el 30 de diciembre de 1963.

Doc. 2 Antecedentes sobre el Tema "Estudio Comparado entre la Declaración Americana de los Derechos y Deberes del Hombre, la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos y los correspondientes textos constitucionales de los Estados Americanos"

Doc. 3 Tercer Informe sobre Libertad de Expresion, Informacion, e Investigacion

Doc. 4, Rev. Resumen de las comunicaciones recibidas por la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, correspondiente el Séptimo Periodo de Sesiones

Doc. 5 Informe sobre la situacion de los derechos humanos en Haiti

Doc. 6 Preliminary Study of the State of Siege and the protection of human rights in the Americas

Doc. 7 Human Rights and Representative Democracy

Doc. 8 Informe sometido por la Subcomisión a la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

Doc. 9 Discurso pronunciado por el Dr. Gabino Fraga, Vicepresidente de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos en la Sesión Inaugural celebrada en el Salon de Honor de la Universidad de Chile

Doc. 10 Informe del Secretario Ejecutivo sobre las actividades de la Secretaria entre el Sexto y Séptimo Periodos de Sesiones

Doc. 11 Discurso del Sr. Ministro de Relaciones Exteriores Don Enrique Ortuzar Escobar, en la Inauguracion del Séptimo Periodo de Sesiones de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

Doc. 12 Comisión Europea e Interamericana de Derechos Humanos Semajanzas y Diferencias

Doc. 13 Discurso pronunciado por el Dr. Jose A. Mora, Secretario General de la Organizacion de los Estados Americanos en la Sesión de Clausura del Séptimo Periodo de Sessiones de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, celebrada en el Salon de Honor de la Universidad de Chile

Doc. 14 Discurso pronunciado por el Profesor Manuel Bianchi, Presidente de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos en la Sesión de Clausura celebrada en el Salon de Honor de la Universidad de Chile

Doc. 15 Proyecto de Convencion Interamericana sobre Libertad de Expresion, de Informacion y de Investigacion

Doc. 16 Acta Resumida de la Primera Sesión Celebrada el 7 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 17 Acta Resumida de la Segunda Sesión celebrada el 8 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 18 Acta Resumida de la Sesión Inaugural, celebrada el 8 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 19 Acta Resumida de la Tercera Sesión, celebrada el 9 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 20 Acta Resumida de la Cuarta Sesión, Celebrada el 10 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 21 Acta Resumida de la Quinta Sesión, celebrada el 11 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 22 Acta Resumida de la Sexta Sesión, celebrada el 14 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 23 Acta Resumida de la Septima Sesión, celebrada el 14 de

octubre de 1963

Doc. 24 Acta Resumida de la Octava Sesion, celebrada el 15 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 25 Acta Resumida de la Novena Sesión, celebrada el 15 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 26 Acta Resumida de la Décima Sesión, celebrada el 16 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 27 Acta Resumida de la Undécima Sesión, celebrada el 17 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 28 Acta Resumida de la Duodécima Sesión, celebrada el 18 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 29 Acta Resumida de la Décimatercera Sesión, celebrada el 18 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 30 Acta Resumida de la Decimacuarta Sesión, celebrada el 21 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 31 Acta Resumida de la Décimaquinta Sesión, celebrada el 22 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 32 Acta Resumida de la Décimasexta Sesión, celebrada el 23 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 33 Acta Resumida de la Décimaséptima Sesión, celebrada el 24 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 34 Acta Resumida de la Sesión de Clausura, celebrada el 25 de octubre de 1963

Doc. 35* Informe sobre la Labor Desarrollada durante su Séptimo

Periodo de Sesiones

* This document was also published in English, Portuguese and French.