2006 SAB Members

Jessica Farb
Lizzie Rushing
Bjorn Sorenson
Amy Tai
Anneke Victorica
Mark Vorkink

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2006 Student Advisory Board

Jessica Farb

Jessica graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003 with a B.A. in Latin American Studies and Psychology. As an undergraduate she spent one year studying in Argentina, during which time the country transitioned through a major economic crisis and its poverty level skyrocketed. After college, she spent one year in San Diego, California as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer, working with indigent immigrants who were victims of trauma and sought representation to remain legally in the country. She has lived and worked in Ecuador, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Spain and Italy and speaks Spanish, Portuguese and Italian. She was introduced to the Italian language and environmentally-friendly farming methods while working on organic farms throughout Italy. Jessica's focus is in International Human Rights, particularly as it relates to immigration law in the US. She currently works at the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. 2007

Lizzie Rushing

Lizzie completed her Bachelor's degree in International Affairs with a minor in Mandarin Chinese at the University of Colorado at Boulder. During her undergraduate career, she studied Mandarin and taught English in Shanghai, China, interned at the United Nations' Commission on Human Rights in Geneva, Switzerland, and conducted extensive field research in Beijing on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the People's Republic of China. Lizzie is a research assistant and ICC monitor at the War Crimes Research Office, a research assistant for the René Cassin Moot Court Competition, and a French interpreter at the International Human Rights Law Clinic. Before coming to law school she sold everything of value and backpacked for a year to over a dozen developing countries in Asia and West Africa, during which time she volunteered for UNESCO's Volunteers for Peace program.

Bjorn Sorenson

Bjorn received a JD/MA at American University focusing on International Law and Development. Bjorn received his bachelor's degree from Western Michigan University with a double major in Music and Comparative Religion. After a year abroad in Taiwan, Thailand, India and Israel, Bjorn attended Harvard Divinity School where he focused on world religions and culture, and the psychology of religious conflict. He received additional training from the Institute for International Mediation and Conflict Resolution in the Netherlands, and has worked as a mediator in Michigan. Before attending Washington College of Law, Bjorn worked for Long Island University administering the Comparative Religion and Culture Program and teaching a course on "Religion, Conflict Resolution, and Pluralism."

Amy Tai

Amy received her B.A. in International Studies with minors in Economics and Chinese from Emory University.  After college, she worked at Human Rights in China for three years managing a project using the Internet to promote freedom of expression and access to information in China.  At HRIC, she presented and published articles on ensuring the protection and promotion of human rights with the advancement of technology, and participated in the UN World Summit on the Information Society and the UN Commission on Human Rights.  She has also advocated for the release of political prisoners by submitting their cases to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention.  She is a staff writer for WCL's Human Rights Brief, and a law volunteer for the Asian Pacific American Legal Resource Center where she assists staff attorneys on cases dealing with immigration, labor and employment, and domestic violence.  This summer, she will be interning with the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund to safeguard the voting rights of Asian Americans and promote more civic participation in the community. 

Anneke Victorica

Anneke received her Bachelors degree in Anthropology and French Literature from the University of Florida in 2004. She has worked with children in foster care as they were rebuilding relationships with their abusive parents. She performed research for political strategists who were hired by the president of Indonesia to strengthen her re-election campaign. This research was also used, unsuccessfully, to thwart the promotion of a military officer accused of war crimes. She spent the rest of her year before law school traveling throughout the U.S. and abroad. at WCL, she has participated in the Genocide Teaching Project and has volunteered with the War Crimes Research Office to update news on the proceedings of the Special Court for Sierra Leone. She has also volunteered by translating documents for the International Human Rights Clinic. She will spend the summer after her first year of law school in Capetown, researching the judicial interpretation of the South African Constitution as it pertains to children’s rights. In the future, she hopes to work in the field of international child advocacy, between the Netherlands and West Africa or Indonesia.

Mark Vorkink

Mark graduated from Wesleyan University in 2005 with a B.A. in Religion, concentrating in Islam and Middle Eastern Studies. While in college, he worked for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees on reparations and asylum issues in Croatia, where he was living at the time, and will work for the International Organization for Migration this summer on human trafficking in Turkey. Currently at WCL, he is a writer and articles editor for the Human Rights Brief. Mark is particularly interested in the application and enforcement of international human rights in the Middle East, especially in relation to government accountability. Additionally, he seeks to strengthen the United States’ adherence to human rights standards in its foreign and domestic policy.