Addressing Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders

National Institute of Corrections
American University Washington College of Law
March 6 - 11, 2005

Faculty Biographies

Darrell Alley
Susan Carle
Dee Halley
Marianne McNabb
Brenda V. Smith
Melissa Turner
Ashbel T. (A.T.) Wall, II
Jaime M. Yarussi


Darrell Alley

Mr. Alley retired on December 31, 2004 concluding a 37 year sworn law enforcement career serving constituents in Florida, Virginia, Tennessee, and the National Institute of Corrections. He received his Bachelors Degree from Covenant College(TN), and his Masters Degree from Tusculum College(TN). He is a graduate of the National Crime Prevention Institute, the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville, and the Tennessee Government Executive Institute at the University of Tennessee. He served as an adjunct faculty member at the Cleveland State Community College(TN), the Cleveland State Law Enforcement Training Center(TN), the Tennessee Correction Academy, and as a training consultant with the National Institute Of Corrections(NIC).

In May, 2003, he was selected to serve a two year assignment at NIC as Correctional Program Specialist. At the time of his appointment to NIC, he was serving as Director of Internal Affairs for the Tennessee Department of Correction. He reorganized, managed a reduction of force, and centralized Internal Affairs to report directly to the Commissioner of Correction. In that capacity, he directed state-wide investigative teams who were responsible for criminal and administrative investigations at all TDOC institutions, facilities, and work sites throughout Tennessee.

Immediately preceding his 1996 appointment as Director of Internal Affairs, he served for 11 years as the Chief Criminal Investigator for Jerry N. Estes, District Attorney General, 10th Judicial District of Tennessee. His duties included investigating, coordinating and/or monitoring all major investigations, facilitating victim/witness functions, and general administrative / management responsibilities. He also served as the investigators representative on Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference Advisory Committee.

Prior to his appointment in Tennessee, he served two years in the Carroll County (VA) Sheriff's Department. He served as Deputy Sheriff, Chief of Investigations, and Chief Deputy. During that assignment, he established that department's first formal criminal investigations unit and employee selection process.

Mr. Alley was employed 13 years with the Pompano Beach (FL) Police Department. He served as a patrol officer, covert operations officer, detective, Community Relations Unit supervisor, Crime Prevention Unit supervisor, Patrol shift commander, and as the commander of the Detective Division. Prior to his employment with the Pompano Beach Police Department, he served as a Military Police Officer in the Army Reserves.

He served in various capacities as a member of the Exchange Club, Rotary Club, and United Way. He is past Chaplain, Secretary, and Vice President of the National Internal Affairs Investigators Association. He maintains membership in the Fraternal Order of Police, Tennessee Correction Association, American Correctional Association, and other professional organizations.

He and his wife, Laura, have been married for thirty-eight years and have two children and seven grandchildren. He currently serves a criminal justice consultant and full-time Associate Pastor at the River of Life Assembly of God in Smyrna, Tennessee.


Susan Carle

Susan Carle is an Associate Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law, where she teaches torts, labor and employment law, legal ethics, and externship seminars. Prior to joining the faculty in 1997, Prof. Carle practiced law in the areas of labor and employment, primarily representing employees and labor unions. Prior to that, she worked for two years for the United States Department of Justice arguing appeals in cases arising under federal anti-discrimination laws covering employment and other issues. She graduated from Yale Law School in 1988 and clerked for the Honorable Dolores K. Sloviter of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in 1988-1989.


Dee Halley

Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections,
Administration Division: Special Projects,
320 First Street, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20534;
800-995-6423, extension 40374; fax 202-307-3361;
e mail:dhalley@bop.gov

Dee was involved in local corrections for 17 years through the Sheriff's Department in Boulder County, Colorado. During this time she served as a correctional officer, accreditation manager, transition coordinator, work release coordinator, and classification supervisor. From 1981 through 1986, Dee served as the NIC Area Resource Center Grant Coordinator. Working with the NIC Jails Division, she provided a number of training and consultant services in the areas of policy and procedures development, accreditation, staffing, legal issues, basic detention officer training, and jail planning and design.

In May of 1990, she began work as a Correctional Program Specialist for the NIC Jails Division. The majority of her work involved coordination of the Facility Development Program. This included: managing the Planning on New Institutions (PONI) and Jail Design Review programs, conducting reviews of proposed jail plans, and acting as the liaison to the American Institute of Architect's Committee on Architecture for Justice. While at the Jails Division she also coordinated technical assistance and training for agencies in the areas of accreditation, jail staffing, jail administration, and the Americans With Disabilities Act.

In August of 1994 Dee transferred to the NIC Academy Division. Her responsibilities included coordination and training delivery for training programs addressing planning of new institutions for juvenile facilities, managing change, evaluation strategies, inter personal communications, and correctional boot camp design and implementation. Dee has also administered technical assistance awards and served for four years as the Southern Region Coordinator for the Academy's Regionalization Project.

Her primary focus while at the Academy was correctional management and leadership training. This included coordination of the Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) and Management Development for the Future programs. To help enhance the delivery of these programs, she has been qualified to administer both the Benchmarks leadership assessment and Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Dee also managed the Correctional Core Competency Model project and began it's incorporation into the CLD program.

In March of 2002, Dee transferred to the NIC Special Projects Division. Her projects have included coordinating the Planning of New Institutions for Juvenile Facilities and Juvenile Transition and Activation Process programs, the Native American and Alaskan Technical Assistance Project (NAATAP), and the Staff Sexual Misconduct Initiative. In late 2003 she was assigned to coordinate the Institute's activities under the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).


Marianne McNabb

Ms McNabb has held a variety of executive level positions in both the Washington and Alaska Department of Corrections. As a former Regional Administrator and Assistant Director of Community Corrections in Washington State, and a Deputy Director of Institutions and Community Corrections, in Alaska, she has experience in many areas of corrections and an appreciation for the complexity of the field.

Trained as an assessment team member under the National Institute of Corrections Institutional Culture Initiative as well as having done socio-economic research in the Arctic, Ms McNabb has a well-grounded understanding of culture change as well as the National Institute of Corrections multiple strategies addressing culture.

Ms McNabb is a private consultant and principal in the Social Research Institute and is involved in a variety of projects nation-wide. She currently works with The Moss Group, Inc, in a cooperative agreement with NIC to provide planning and strategic activities to assist with implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. She has a Master's degree in Sociology.


Brenda V. Smith

Brenda V. Smith is an Associate Professor at the Washington College of Law at American University where she co-teaches in the Community Economic Development Law Clinic. Professor Smith is also the Project Director for the United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections Cooperative Agreement on Addressing Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders. In November, 2003, Prof. Smith was appointed to the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission by the United States House of Representatives Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi (D. CA). Prior to her faculty appointment at the Washington College of Law, Prof. Smith was the Senior Counsel for Economic Security at the National Women's Law Center and Director of the Center's Women in Prison Project and Child and Family Support Project. Prof. Smith is a 1984 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, and a magna cum laude graduate of Spelman College in 1980.

Prof. Smith is an expert on issues affecting women in prison and has published and spoken widely on those issues. Recent publications include: Battering, Forgiveness and Redemption: Exploring Alternative Models for Addressing Domestic Violence in Communities of Color, in DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AT THE MARGINS : READINGS ON RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND CULTURE (Rutgers University Press, 2004); Watching You, Watching Me, 15 Yale Journal of Law and Feminism 225 ( 2003); Battering, Forgiveness and Redemption, 11 American University Journal of Gender Social Policy and the Law 921, Volume 2 (2003); An End to Silence: Prisoners' Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Misconduct, (2d Ed., Washington College of Law, 2002); ASexual Abuse Against Women in Prison,@ American Bar Association Criminal Justice Magazine, Vol. 16. No. 1, Spring, 2001; An End to Silence: Women Prisoners' Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Misconduct (National Women's Law Center: April, 1998); AIncarceration," in Women's Health Across the Lifespan: A Comprehensive Perspective (Lippincott: 1997); A Vision Beyond Survival: A Resource Guide for Incarcerated Women (National Women's Law Center: Fall, 1995); and Female Prisoners and AIDS: On the Margins of Public Health and Social Justice, 9 AIDS & Public Policy Journal 78 (Summer, 1994).

Prof. Smith has received numerous honors, including the prestigious Kellogg National Fellowship in 1993. Professor Smith was inducted into the D.C. Women's Hall of Fame in 1998 for her work on behalf of low-income women in the District of Columbia. Most recently, Professo Smith was awarded the Emalee C. Godsey Research Award for her article, Battering, Forgiveness and Redemption.


Melissa Turner

Melissa Turner is a clinical social worker with over fifteen years of clinical experience working with various populations. In Albany, New York, she began her professional career in an alternative sentencing program that advocated in the criminal courts for treatment oriented dispositions rather than incarceration. At the Washington VA Medical Center where she has worked for 11 years, Melissa has specialized in the psychosocial care and treatment of veterans with HIV/AIDS many of whom have a history of post traumatic stress disorder, sexual trauma, mental illness and addiction. As a private mental health consultant, Melissa has focused on women's issues and has facilitated psycho-educational groups for mandated clients in residential drug treatment. She is known for incorporating nontraditional expressive therapies such as meditation, aromatherapy, music, poetry, art and other techniques, into the traditional psychotherapeutic group setting. At Our Place, DC, an agency dedicated to assisting incarcerated women with reentering the community, Melissa is the clinical social work consultant and provides therapeutic intervention to formerly incarcerated women. Melissa received her Master of Social Work degree from the State University of New York at Albany, New York and lives in Washington, DC.


Ashbel T. (A.T.) Wall, II

A.T. Wall's career in Corrections began in 1976 as a line Probation officer. He served in the capacity of Assistant Director for the Rhode Island Department of Corrections from 1987 through 1999. Mr. Wall was appointed Director of the Department in 2000. He holds B.A. and J.D. degrees from Yale University.


Jaime M. Yarussi

Jaime Yarussi received a dual Bachelor's degree in Political Science and Justice in May of 2001 from American University's School of Public Affairs. In December of 2003, she completed American University's School of Public Affairs master's program in Justice Law and Society with a specialization in corrections and public policy.

Jaime started as Program Coordinator with the NIC Project at the Washington College of Law in January of 2004 and has helped to accomplish the near completion of a correctional officer handbook on addressing staff sexual misconduct and the completion of a core curriculum for the project. In addition she has overseen the organization of NIC training programs for staff sexual misconduct.

Jaime's on-hand correctional experience comes mainly from the completion of an internship with the Montgomery County Pre-Release Center during her master's program. She was involved with resident supervision, disciplinary hearings, recreational trip supervision, urinalysis collection and testing, as well as treatment and crisis intervention for offenders.

Jaime also devotes her spare time to the D.C. Rape Crisis Center where she is a counselor for rape and incest survivors through the crisis center's hotline which is for men and women, children, gay, lesbian, and trans-gendered members of the community. She is also a counselor for rape victims through the crisis center's S.A.N.E. Program which offers counseling and advice during the hospital visit (where evidence is collected) and through police interviews as well as the legal and court process for a rape victim.



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