Addressing Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates

National Institute of Corrections
American University Washington College of Law
March 9-14, 200

Faculty Biographies

Susan Carle
John F. Kenney
Susan W. McCampbell
Susan E. Poole
Brenda V. Smith
Melissa Turner
Ashbel T. (A.T.) Wall, II


Susan Carle

Susan Carle is an Associate Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law, where she teaches torts, labor and employment law, legal ethics, and externship seminars. Prior to joining the faculty in 1997, Prof. Carle practiced law in the areas of labor and employment, primarily representing employees and labor unions. Prior to that, she worked for two years for the United States Department of Justice arguing appeals in cases arising under federal anti-discrimination laws covering employment and other issues. She graduated from Yale Law School in 1988 and clerked for the Honorable Dolores K. Sloviter of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in 1988-1989.


John F. Kenney

John Kenney has a B.S. in Criminal Justice from Elmira College, Elmira, New York. He began work as a Correctional Officer in 1982, was promoted to Sergeant in 1985, Lieutenant in 1986, and became a Captain in 1987. In 1991 he was appointed as Chief Investigator, promoted to Assistant Deputy Superintendent in 1992, and finally promoted to Assistant Superintendent in 2001. In this assignment, he is in charge of facility security and the Special Operations Unit including investigations and intelligence for 2000 bed facility and 800 employees. He also conducts investigations into security breaches, contraband, staff/inmate misconduct.


Susan W. McCampbell

Susan W. McCampbell is President of the Center for Innovative Public Policies, Inc., (CIPP) a not-for-profit company specializing in public policy consulting.

CIPP currently has several cooperative agreements with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC): to develop curricula to effectively manage a multi-generational workforce; to provide technical assistance to state and local correctional agencies regarding the issues associated with staff sexual misconduct with inmates; and to develop a bulletin on gender responsive jail operations for the administrators of small and medium sized jails.

Ms. McCampbell is the co-author of Training Curriculum for Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates, Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates: Implications for Jail Administrators, Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct in a Jail Setting, and Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates: a Policy Development Guide for Sheriffs and Jail Administrators for the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). She also instructs in NIC programs addressing staff sexual misconduct. In February 2002, NIC published the Resource Guide for Newly Appointed Wardens, co-authored by Ms. McCampbell, Elizabeth Layman and Marie Hall. She has also co-authored articles about staff sexual misconduct for American Jails and Sheriffs magazines.

Prior to founding CIPP in 1999, Ms. McCampbell was the Director of the Department of Detention and Community Control for the Broward County, Florida, Sheriff's Office for four (4) years. During this time, Ms. McCampbell oversaw the daily operations of a jail system with 4,200 inmates, three facilities, a staff of 1,600, and a budget of $110 million. During her tenure, the agency received their initial accreditation from the American Correctional Association, and re-accreditation, the largest agency of its kind to receive simultaneous accreditation for all facilities. Other highlights of her term as Director include implementation of an objective inmate classification system, dramatic improvements in the management and treatment of inmates with a diagnosis of mental illness in the jail system, the planning for a new 1,000 bed men's direct supervision facility, and a 1,000 bed women's jail. While with the Broward Sheriff's Office, Ms. McCampbell served as Chief Deputy/Acting Sheriff for six (6) months following the death of the Sheriff.

Prior to coming to Broward County, Ms. McCampbell was Assistant Sheriff for the City of Alexandria, Virginia, Sheriff's Office for eleven (11) years, a Program Director for Police Executive Research Forum in Washington, D. C., and a regional criminal justice planner in Northern Virginia.

Ms. McCampbell holds a BA in Political Science from the School of Government and Public Administration, The American University, Washington, D. C., and a Master's Degree in City and Regional Planning from the School of Architecture and Engineering of The Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C.


Susan E. Poole

Ms. Poole is a retired warden and is currently working extensively as a Criminal Justice Consultant, providing direct services to agencies in the areas of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates, Working with Female Offenders, Institution Culture Assessment, Strategic Planning, and Executive Leadership Development for Women. Appointed to the position of Warden by the Governor of the state of California in September 1988, Ms. Poole served 13 years at the California Institution for Women in that capacity.

Ms. Poole's background includes 29 years in the field of Corrections with the California Department of Corrections (CDC). She began her career as a Teaching Assistant and was promoted through the custody ranks. She served at two correctional institutions and with three divisions in headquarters: Institutions, Administrative Services, and Manpower Services. Her experience and assignments have included a wide variety of field operations and staff assignments in Corrections' headquarters. While in CDC headquarters, she served in the capacity of Assistant Chief of Personnel, Classification Staff Representative, Chief of Institution Services, and Assistant Deputy Director Institutions Division. For the last thirteen years of her career in Corrections she served as Warden of the California Institution for Women (CIW). CIW is a 1,800 bed correctional facility which at one point reached a capacity of 2700 inmates.

Ms. Poole is a member of the American Correctional Association (ACA), the Association of Black Correctional Workers (ABCW), the Association of Women Executives in Corrections, and the National Association of Blacks In Criminal Justice. She chaired the Department's Training Advisory Committee for five and one-half years. In addition, Ms. Poole was selected as one of the Outstanding Young Women of America for 1983 and participated in the 1995 Leadership California Program. She has served as an appointed board member of the Mt. Baldy United Way, and Opportunities Unlimited, Inc., a youth outreach program. She was selected as California's nominee for Warden of the Year to the North American Association of Wardens and Superintendents in 1999. Ms. Poole has received numerous awards and recognition for her work in the community. She has provided consultant services to the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), to correctional agencies in a number of other states, and is a featured speaker at many community and academic programs. She has recently been selected by the Who's Who Historical Society as a member of their International Who's Who of Professionals for 2001.


Brenda V. Smith

Brenda V. Smith is an Associate Professor at the Washington College of Law at American University where she co-teaches in the Community Economic Development Law Clinic. Prior to joining the faculty at the Washington College of Law, Ms. Smith was Senior Counsel for Economic Security at the National Women's Law Center and Director of the Center's women in Prison Project and Child and Family Support Project. Ms. Smith is a 1984 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and graduated magna cum laude from Spelman College in 1980.

Ms. Smith has a long history of work on issues affecting women and children involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems dating back to her tenure as an attorney with the Public Defender Service of the District of Columbia. Ms. Smith combined her experiences at the Public Defender Service and the National Women's Law Center to create the Women in Prison Project, a legal services and education program which served over 6,000 incarcerated women during its eight-year existence. The program received both local and national recognition, receiving the Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies National Achievement Award in 1990, and the D.C. Commission for Women Community Services Organization of the Year Award in 1991.

Ms. Smith is considered an expert on issues affecting women in prison and has published and spoken widely on those issues. Relevant publications on women in the criminal justice system include: An End to Silence: Women Prisoners' Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Misconduct (American University, 2002); "Incarceration," in Women's Health Across the Lifespan: A Comprehensive Perspective (Lippincott: 1997); A Vision Beyond Survival: A Resource Guide for Incarcerated Women (National Women's Law Center: Fall, 1995); Female Prisoners and AIDS: On the Margins of Public Health and Social Justice, 9 AIDS & Public Policy Journal 78 (Summer, 1994). Ms. Smith is currently working on an article on the legal and public policy implications of cross-gender supervision on women inmates.

Ms. Smith has received numerous honors, including the prestigious Kellogg National Fellowship in 1993, and was into the D.C. Women's Hall of Fame in 1998 for her work on behalf of low-income women in the District of Columbia.


Melissa Turner

Melissa Turner is a clinical social worker with over fifteen years of clinical experience working with various populations. In Albany, New York, she began her professional career in an alternative sentencing program that advocated in the criminal courts for treatment oriented dispositions rather than incarceration. At the Washington VA Medical Center where she has worked for 11 years, Melissa has specialized in the psychosocial care and treatment of veterans with HIV/AIDS many of whom have a history of post traumatic stress disorder, sexual trauma, mental illness and addiction. As a private mental health consultant, Melissa has focused on women's issues and has facilitated psycho-educational groups for mandated clients in residential drug treatment. She is known for incorporating nontraditional expressive therapies such as meditation, aromatherapy, music, poetry, art and other techniques, into the traditional psychotherapeutic group setting. At Our Place, DC, an agency dedicated to assisting incarcerated women with reentering the community, Melissa is the clinical social work consultant and provides therapeutic intervention to formerly incarcerated women. Melissa received her Master of Social Work degree from the State University of New York at Albany, New York and lives in Washington, DC.


Ashbel T. (A.T.) Wall, II

A.T. Wall's career in Corrections began in 1976 as a line Probation officer. He served in the capacity of Assistant Director for the Rhode Island Department of Corrections from 1987 through 1999. Mr. Wall was appointed Director of the Department in 2000. He holds B.A. and J.D. degrees from Yale University.



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