Trade and Environment Seminar: A Collaboration with the OAS Department of Sustainable Development

June 16-June 20, 2014

The Environmental Law Summer Session and the Organization of American States Department of Sustainable Development are again hosting a joint seminar focusing on capacity-building in the area of Trade and Environment in the Americas. The Seminar consists of a series of modules taught by leading practitioners from teh Americas and concludes with a trade simulation exercise in which everyone is assigned different roles in a negotiation. The agenda for the seminar can be seen here: DRAFT AGENDA (upated 17 June 2014). You can see the schedules and readings for each module of the 2014 seminar by visiting the TOOL KIT. The modules focus on a variety of topics including: Trade and Environment - Law and Policy; the Intersection between Trade and the Environment; Negotiating Agreements; Environmental Dimensions of International Trade; Enforcement of Trade-Related Environmental Obligations; and Post-Negotiation Issues. The seminar will conclude with a Negotiation Simulation Exercise in which you negotiate an environmental portion of a trade agreement. There will also be a site visit to ExxonMobil to learn more about real-world considerations. Please email Erika Lennon at summerenvironment@wcl.american.edu if you have any questions.

Lecturers

A preliminary list of lecturers is below and includes the following leading practitioners from government and non-governmental organizations from throughout the Americas (lecturers are listed aphabetically). You can see more comprehensive biographies HERE.

Gustavo Alanís Ortega

Gustavo Alanís Ortega is President of the Mexican Environmental Law Center (Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental (CEMDA)), a non-profit organization that seeks to improve and enforce compliance with environmental laws and to create a greater awareness about environmental issues. CEMDA works on a variety of environmental law issues and has offices in numerous Mexican states. Prior to this, he worked for the Environmental Law Institute (ELI) and served as a member of ELI's Board of Directors. From 2001-2003, he was a member of Mexico's National Advisory Council for Sustainable Development (CCNDS), which advises the Federal Government in Mexico on environmental policy. Additionally, from May 2001 to October 2004, Mr. Alanis was a member of NAFTA's Environmental Commission Joint Public Advisory Committee (JPAC), and in September 2008, was reappointed to JPAC by Mexico's Federal Minister of the Environment. From 1997 to 2000, he was a member of the Program Advisory Board of the International Center on Trade and Sustainable Development in Geneva. Gustavo Alanis Ortega is also a professor of environmental law at the Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA) Law School in Mexico City, and has also taught courses on national and international environmental law at the Universidad Panamericana (UP) in Mexico City and Guadalajara; Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico (ITAM) in Mexico City; Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM) in Guadalajara, State of Mexico, and Ciudad Obregon; the Environmental Program of the National University (UNAM); and the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económica (CIDE). Currently, he is a member of the Mexican Government Advisory Committee on Climate Change, a member of the Directorate of the Inter American Association for the Defense of the Environment (AIDA), and a member of the Environmental Law Alliance World Wide (ELAW). Additionally, Mr. Alanis has given lectures and speeches on Mexican and International Environmental Law throughout Mexico and in a variety of countries. Mr. Alanis received his law degree at the Universidad de Iberoamericana in Mexico City and received his LL.M at American University Washington College of Law.

Max Campos

Max Campos is the Chief of the Integrated Water Resources Management Section of the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States. With an academic background in Earth Sciences and Meteorology from Millersville University of Pennsylvania and the University of Costa Rica, Max Campos has been the Senior Chief of the Integrated Water Resources Management Section at the Organization of American States (OAS) since October 2009. Previously he was the Executive Secretary for the Regional Committee on Hydraulic Resources (CRRH), an agency of the Central America Integration System (SICA) specialized in integrated water resources management, hydrometeorology, and climate. Having developed a profession in the administration of science as well as in the formulation and evaluation of projects, Mr. Campos has worked for international organizations like GEF, UNDP, UNEP, WMO, and OAS, for all governments in Central America, for nongovernmental organizations like IUCN and the Global Water Partnership (GWP), and for Universities and the private sector. He began his professional meteorology at the Costa Rican National Meteorological Institute, where he was head of the departments of climatology and information, before becoming an advisor of Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Ministers of Environment for different countries in the region, particularly on global change issues, ranging from science to policies. Mr. Campos was later appointed Project Manager for the Central America Project on Climate Change, sponsored by the United States.

Claudia de Windt

Claudia de Windt is the Chief of the Environmental Law, Policy and Good Governance Section of the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States. Ms. de Windt currently focuses on capacity building efforts in the areas of trade and sustainable development, environmental law and enforcement, access to information and justice, and participation. She has published various articles on these and other subjects has co-authored in the field of sustainable development. She is a graduate of law from Universidad Iberoamericana (UNIBE) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and has a Masters of Law in International Legal Studies from American University Washington College of Law. Prior to joining the OAS in 2001, Ms. de Windt was an Associate Attorney for the firm Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, where she worked as counsel for international and local organizations mainly in the areas of contracts, banking, maritime, corporate, and investment Law. She was appointed by the President of the Dominican Republicas Judicial Interpreter of The Court of First Instance of Santo Domingo in 1999. Ms. de Windt is admitted to practice in the Dominican Republic and a member of the Dominican Bar Association. She also served as Vice–President of the LL.M student association at the Washington College of Law in 2000. Languages: native language is Spanish, she is also fluent in English and has working knowledge of French and Portuguese.

Ernesto Guevara Lam

Ernesto Guevara Lam is Coordinador de Comercio y Ambiente del Vice Ministerio de Comercio Exterior (MINCETUR). Ernesto recieved his JD degree and completed his Masters in International Economy Law from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. He completed additional postgraduate studies in Political Commerce at the World Trade Organization – WTO (Geneva, 2002) and in the Advanced Program for Government Officials titled A Trade Agenda for the Americas: Multilateral and Regional Approaches (Georgetown University, Washington D.C., 2001). Mr. Guevara has been legal Counsel to the Viceminister of Foreign Trade in the
Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism (MINCETUR) of Peru since November 1998. He currently serves as Coordinator of the Trade, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures area and of the Trade and Environment area at the MINCETUR. Ernesto has also been the Representative of Peru before the Committee of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures at the WTO since 2002, and has acted as Chief negotiator on the Topic of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures in the Free-Trade Agreements (FTAs) between Peru and Chile, Peru and Thailand, Peru and Singapore, Peru and Canada, Peru and China, and Peru and Japan. Additionally, Ernesto served as Chief Negotiator on the Topic of the Environment in the FTAs between Peru and the United States, Peru and Canada, Peru and Korea, and Peru and Japan, and is currently Chief Negotiator on the Topic of the Environment in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Mr. Guevara’s JD thesis, “Legitimate Defense in the UN Charter: Article 51,” received an outstanding grade. He was a professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú in the Masters of International Economic Law program in 2003 and 2007 and has published various articles in specialized publications on International Law and International Trade. In 2010 Ernesto co-edited the book “Peru and International Trade,” in which he wrote the article about sanitary and phytosanitary measures and international trade. He was also invited in June 2010 to speak at the Workshop of Experts of the OECD, “Regional Trade Agreements and the Environment: Monitoring Implementation and Assessing Impacts,” put on at OECD headquarters in Paris. Mr. Guevara is currently a professor of courses on Economic Integration and International Trade and Negotiations in International Business in the International Administration and Business program at the Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC).

David Hunter

David Hunter is a Professor of Law and the Director of the International Legal Studies Program and the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law at American University Washington College of Law. He is also the Director of the Environmental Law Summer Session. He is the former Executive Director of the Center for International Environmental Law and was previously an Associate with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher, and Flom. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, EarthRights International, the Project on Government Oversight, the Bank Information Center, and the Center for Progressive Reform. His research and advocacy work covers a broad range of global environment and development issues. Mr. Hunter is a co-author of International Environmental Law and Policy, currently in its 4th edition. He holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Davis Jones

Davis Jones is the Associate Director for International Capacity Building, International Compliance Assurance Division, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Mr. Davis Jones has worked in the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s International Compliance Assurance Division since 2002 building enforcement and inspection capacity worldwide.  He has led courses throughout Latin America, Africa, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe.  He is EPA’s staff liaison to the International Network for Environmental Compliance and Enforcement (INECE), helps develop regional enforcement networks worldwide, and is the lead for environmental enforcement issues along the U.S./Mexico border.  He began his career in 1990 in the Office of Waste Programs Enforcement where he helped develop hazardous waste enforcement cases, participated in hazardous waste regulatory development, and provided guidance and training to hazardous waste inspectors.  In 1995 he moved to the Multimedia Enforcement Division to investigate and develop cases against large, national corporations with multiple violations at facilities nation-wide. Prior to joining the US EPA, Mr. Jones served 3 years in the United States Peace Corps as a natural resource volunteer in the Dominican Republic.  He successfully started a wood burning cookstove project that continues after over 25 years.  He has a Masters of Science in Environmental Science and Public Policy, and a Bachelors of Science in Natural Resources and speaks fluent English and Spanish.

Erika Lennon

Erika Lennon is a lawyer and Program Coordinator for the Program on International an Comparative Environmental Law at American University Washington College of Law. She is also the assistant director of the Environmental Law Summer Session. In 2012, Erika became an adjunct professor at WCL where she primarily teaches legal research and writing to the international students working towards their LL.M. She has also worked as Staff Attorney at Greenpeace US. Prior to law school, she worked as the Hunger Education and Research Assistant at the Alameda County Community Food Bank (Oakland, CA) as an AmeriCorps member. Erika received her J.D. from American University Washington College of Law and her B.A. with honors in history from the University of California, Berkeley.

Fernando Ocampo

Fernando Ocampo was the Vice Minister of Trade of Costa Rica. In recent years, he served as chief of negotiations of free trade agreements between Costa Rica and China and Costa Rica and Singapore, as well as deputy for business matters in negotiating the Central Association-European Union Agreement. As part of his career in the Ministry of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica, Ocampo was director general of foreign trade from 2001 to 2005, where he was responsible for coordinating and leading various issues in the negotiation process with the United States, CARICOM, and other partners. Previously, Ocampo was an international consultant on issues of foreign trade and trade integration. Moreover, he was a university professor, has lectured in over fifteen countries, and has published several articles on issues related to foreign trade. Ocampo is a law graduate and has a degree in public law from the University of Costa Rica, a master's degree in international political economy from the London School of Economics, and has studied at the Center for Law and Trade Policy in Ottawa, Canada and the World Trade Institute in Bern, Switzerland.

Cesar Parga

César Parga is a Senior Trade Specialist at the Department of Trade, Tourism and Competitiveness of the Organization of American States. Mr. Parga provides technical and analytical support in the fields of intellectual property rights and dispute settlement issues in matters relevant to the work of the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) and other regional trade arrangements. Mr. Parga is in charge of the OAS Competitiveness Program which promotes public policy dialogue and exchange of experiences between high-level authorities and public-private competitiveness councils of the Americas. In the field of trade and integration in the Western Hemisphere, Mr. Parga primarily focuses on issues related to trade promotion, intellectual property, and competitiveness. He coordinates and delivers trade capacity building initiatives for governments, the private sector, and civil society across Latin America and the Caribbean. Mr. Parga designs and implements projects which foster the exchange of best practices, transfer of technology networks, and use of intellectual property in developing countries to promote innovation and competitiveness. Mr. Parga is a lawyer graduated from the University of Guadalajara, México, where he specialized in contracts and torts as Adjunct Professor of Civil Law. He received the LL.M. Master of Laws Degree on Patent and Intellectual Property Rights at the Law School of the George Washington University in Washington, D.C, where he currently serves as Adjunct Professor of Law, and also received a Post Graduate Certificate on International Trade from the University Institute of European Studies and the ILO International Training Center in Torino, Italy. Mr. Parga has served as guest lecturer at the University of Baylor Law School and visiting researcher at the National University of Singapore.

Andrés Sánchez

Andres Sanchez is a Consultant at the Integrated Water Resources Management Section of the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States. Andrés Sánchez is a young professional, an Economist with an Academic Option in Business Administration from the Universidad de Los Andes located in Bogotá, Colombia. Also, He has taken graduate studies on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) with United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-WEH); and currently, He is persuing his Master’s degree on Environmental Sciences and Policy at the Johns Hopkins University in Washington DC. Andres started his professional career in the Department of Sustainable Development (DSD) of the OAS in September 2009, joining a working team of the Sustainable Cities, Biodiversity and Sustatinable Land Management Section, to give support ot the implementation of the Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network Project (IABIN). In January 2010, he joined the Integrated Water Resources Management Section (IWRM) of the DSD/OAS to work in the Monitoring and Evaluation component of the IWRM's Global Environmental Facility (GEF) projects portfolio. Among others activities he works are, the formulation of new project proposal on integrated superficial and groundwater management in the Americas; and to be the project coordinator for the Youthful Water Initiative for the Americas. Within Andres's interests and experience are environmental and economic management, climate change, social development, policy analysis, and the development of multidisciplinary frameworks towards environmental management.

Panelists

The discussion of Post-Negotiation Issues will be enhanced by the participation of expert panelists, including:

Alejandra Goyenechea
Alejandra Goyenechea is International Counsel at Defenders of Wildlife. Alejandra's primary focus is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and other international trade law issues, with an emphasis on Latin America. She has worked at several international institutions and organizations, and has experience in wildlife policy and broader experience in other environmental areas. During her work with the Mexican government, she represented the Environmental Enforcement Agency at the international level. She also has interned or worked at the Organization of American States, the UNEP North American office, and Baker Botts, a DC law firm. Alejandra earned her law degree at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, Mexico. In 2000, she came to DC on a Fullbright scholarship and completed her LL.M. at the American University Washington College of Law.

Joseph O'Donnell
Joseph O'Donnell is the Manager of Government and Public Affairs for the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) where she is the chief lobbyist and handles the IWPA PAC. Prior to joining IWPA, O’Donnell served ten years on the staff of former U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar, a former Chairman of both the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry and the Committee on Foreign Relations. His positions included Deputy Legislative Director and Senior Legislative Assistant while focusing on assisting stakeholders interacting with federal agencies and advancing funding priorities through the budget process.

Sarah Stewart
Ms. Stewart has been Director for Environment and Natural Resources at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President (USTR) since January 2013. Ms. Stewart’s portfolio is focused on overseeing implementation of the Environment Chapters of U.S. trade agreements in the Western Hemisphere, including the United States – Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (PTPA), United States – Central America – Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA – DR), United States – Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement, United States – Panama Trade Promotion Agreement, and the United States – Chile Free Trade Agreement. Ms. Stewart’s responsibilities also include managing implementation of the PTPA Annex on Forest Sector Governance, and establishment of secretariats for environmental enforcement matters under the PTPA, and TPAs with Colombia and Panama. Ms. Stewart also monitors issues concerning green government procurement, environmental standards, and trade in wildlife and timber species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to ensure consistency of U.S. environmental laws and policy with U.S. trade policy and international trade obligations. Prior to joining USTR’s Environment and Natural Resources Office, Ms. Stewart held the position of Senior Attorney for International Law and Trade at The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) since December 2012, and was Special Counsel for International Trade Policy for Humane Society International (HSI) since August 2007. Prior to HSUS/HSI, Ms. Stewart was an associate with the Law Offices of Stewart and Stewart from September 2002 to August 2007. Ms. Stewart received a bachelor of arts degree in international studies from Lehigh University in 1997, and a law degree with honors from the American University’s Washington College of Law in 2002.

PAST SEMINARS

June 17-21, 2013

The Environmental Law Summer Session and the Organization of American States Department of Sustainable Development are hosting a joint seminar focusing on capacity-building in the area of Trade and Environment in the Americas. The Seminar will consist of a series of modules taught by leading practitioners from the Americas and will conclude with a trade simulation exercise. The Agenda for the Trade and Environment seminar can be found here: Final Agenda (updated 13 June 2013).

You can see the schedule and readings for the modules of the 2013 seminar by visiting the Tool Kit. The modules focus on a variety of topics including: Trade and Environment - Law and Policy; the Intersection between Trade and the Environment; Negotiating Agreements; Environmental Dimensions of International Trade; Enforcement of Trade-Related Environmental Obligations; and Post-Negotiation Issues. The seminar will conclude with a Negotiation Simulation Exercise. There will also be a site visit to ExxonMobil to learn more about real-world considerations. The seminar will conclude with a trade simulation exercise related to negotiating an environmental portion of a trade agreement.

If you have any questions please email Erika Lennon at summerenvironment@wcl.american.edu.

View the Photo Gallery and the Flickr page!

Lecturers

A preliminary list of lecturers is below and includes the following leading practitioners from government and non-governmental organizations from throughout the Americas (lecturers are listed aphabetically). Additionally, you can see more comprehensive biographies and photos here.

Gustavo Alanís Ortega

Gustavo Alanís Ortega is President of the Mexican Environmental Law Center (Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental (CEMDA)). Mr. Alanís, a practicing lawyer, teaches environmental law the Universidad Iberoamericana's law school in Mexico City. He is also co-director of the university's post-graduate diploma program in environmental law and policy. Since August 1993, he has been president of CEMDA, a public interest environmental law organization based in Mexico City. He is also active as a columnist for "Reforma," one of Mexico's most read and influential newspapers. He is a member of the seventh cohort of the Leadership of Environment and Development Program (LEAD) and part of the Joint Public Advisory Committee (JPAC) under the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation. Mr. Alanís has an LL.M. in international law from the Washington College of Law.

Max Campos

Max Campos is the Chief of the Integrated Water Resources Management Section of the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States With an academic background in Earth Sciences and Meteorology from Millersville University of Pennsylvania and the University of Costa Rica, Max Campos has been the Senior Chief of the Integrated Water Resources Management Section at the Organization of American States (OAS) since October 2009. Previously he was the Executive Secretary for the Regional Committee on Hydraulic Resources (CRRH), an agency of the Central America Integration System (SICA) specialized in integrated water resources management, hydrometeorology, and climate. Having developed a profession in the administration of science as well as in the formulation and evaluation of projects, Mr. Campos has worked for international organizations like GEF, UNDP, UNEP, WMO, and OAS, for all governments in Central America, for nongovernmental organizations like IUCN and the Global Water Partnership (GWP), and for Universities and the private sector. He began his professional meteorology at the Costa Rican National Meteorological Institute, where he was head of the departments of climatology and information, before becoming an advisor of Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Ministers of Environment for different countries in the region, particularly on global change issues, ranging from science to policies. Mr. Campos was later appointed Project Manager for the Central America Project on Climate Change, sponsored by the United States.

Claudia de Windt

A lawyer graduated from Universidad Iberoamericana (UNIBE) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic with a LL.M. in International Legal Studies from American University Washington College of Law, Ms. de Windt has been with the OAS since 2001 as a Legal Specialist for the Department of Sustainable Development and Environment. She leads the Department's work in Environmental Law, Policy, and Good Governance. Her work mainly focuses on the governance aspects of sustainability and on the environmental sustainability of free trade agreements; supporting member States identify the challenges and opportunities for sustainable development derived from economic integration. In addition to supporting the strengthening of institutional-legal frameworks in the hemisphere towards sustainability in trade. Ms. de Windt has experience in legal drafting, negotiations, and international development cooperation projects in different areas, such as international project financing, foreign investment, environmental law, and environmental corporate social responsibility. Prior to coming to OAS, Ms. de Windt was an Associate Attorney for the firm Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, where she worked as Counsel for International and local organizations mainly in the areas of contracts, banking, maritime, corporate, and investment law. She was appointed in 1999, by the President of the Dominican Republic as Judicial Interpreter of The Court of First Instance in Santo Domingo. Ms. de Windt is admitted to practice in the Dominican Republic and a member of the Dominican Bar Association. She also served as Vice-President of the LL.M. student association at the Washington College of Law in 2000. Her native language is Spanish and she is fluent in English and has working knowledge of French and Portuguese.

Geoffrey Garver

Geoffrey Garver is an environmental consultant and lecturer in law in Montreal. President Obama appointed Mr. Garver to serve as one of five U.S. members on the fifteen-member Joint Public Advisory Committee at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in 2010, where he still serves with the group to promote balanced economic and environmental development and public transparency between Mexico, the United States, and Canada. He is also currently an adjunct law professor at the University of Montreal in Montreal, Canada. Mr. Garver has worked as an independent environmental consultant for the Organization of American States and the Secretariat for Environmental Matters for the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement region. From 2000 to 2007, Mr. Garver served as director of Submissions on Enforcement Matters at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation for North America. Previously, Mr. Garver spent nine years as a trial attorney and then became acting assistant chief in the US Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division, where he handled cases concerning land and natural resource management, water rights and environmental impact assessment. His major cases included suits dealing with Everglades water quality, winter use and bison management in Yellowstone National Park and water rights in Idaho and Oregon. He was also part of the U.S. team negotiating with Canada and Mexico toward an agreement on transboundary environmental impact assessment, and he helped develop federal agency guidelines for conducting environmental reviews of trade agreements. From 1993 to 1995, Mr. Garver served as a special assistant and Senior Policy Counsel to the Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the US Environmental Protection Agency, where he directed the process for revising the USEPA's environmental auditing policy. Mr. Garver was a law clerk from 1987 to 1989 to then-Chief Judge Conrad K. Cyr in the United States District Court for the District of Maine. He holds a BS from Cornell University, a JD from the University of Michigan Law School, and is currently pursuing an LLM and a PhD at McGill University.

Ernesto Guevara Lam

Ernesto Guevara Lam is Coordinador de Comercio y Ambiente del Vice Ministerio de Comercio Exterior (MINCETUR). Ernesto recieved his JD degree and completed his Masters in International Economy Law from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. He completed additional postgraduate studies in Political Commerce at the World Trade Organization – WTO (Geneva, 2002) and in the Advanced Program for Government Officials titled A Trade Agenda for the Americas: Multilateral and Regional Approaches (Georgetown University, Washington D.C., 2001). Mr. Guevara has been legal Counsel to the Viceminister of Foreign Trade in the
Ministry of Foreign Trade and Tourism (MINCETUR) of Peru since November 1998. He currently serves as Coordinator of the Trade, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures area and of the Trade and Environment area at the MINCETUR. Ernesto has also been the Representative of Peru before the Committee of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures at the WTO since 2002, and has acted as Chief negotiator on the Topic of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures in the Free-Trade Agreements (FTAs) between Peru and Chile, Peru and Thailand, Peru and Singapore, Peru and Canada, Peru and China, and Peru and Japan. Additionally, Ernesto served as Chief Negotiator on the Topic of the Environment in the FTAs between Peru and the United States, Peru and Canada, Peru and Korea, and Peru and Japan, and is currently Chief Negotiator on the Topic of the Environment in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Mr. Guevara’s JD thesis, “Legitimate Defense in the UN Charter: Article 51,” received an outstanding grade. He was a professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú in the Masters of International Economic Law program in 2003 and 2007 and has published various articles in specialized publications on International Law and International Trade. In 2010 Ernesto co-edited the book “Peru and International Trade,” in which he wrote the article about sanitary and phytosanitary measures and international trade. He was also invited in June 2010 to speak at the Workshop of Experts of the OECD, “Regional Trade Agreements and the Environment: Monitoring Implementation and Assessing Impacts,” put on at OECD headquarters in Paris. Mr. Guevara is currently a professor of courses on Economic Integration and International Trade and Negotiations in International Business in the International Administration and Business program at the Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas (UPC).

David Hunter

David Hunter is a Professor of Law and the Director of the International Legal Studies Program and the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law at American University Washington College of Law. He is also the Director of the Environmental Law Summer Session. He is the former Executive Director of the Center for International Environmental Law and was previously an Associate with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher, and Flom. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, EarthRights International, the Project on Government Oversight, the Bank Information Center, and the Center for Progressive Reform. His research and advocacy work covers a broad range of global environment and development issues. Mr. Hunter is a co-author of International Environmental Law and Policy, currently in its 4th edition. He holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Rodrigo Martinez

Rodrigo Martinez currently works as a consultant in the Climate Change and Sustainability Division, Infrastructure and Environment Sector at the Inter-American Development Bank. Previously, he worked for the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States from 2007 until 2012. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia, a Graduate Certificate of Advanced Financial Management, and a Master in Natural Resource Economics from the University of Queensland, Australia. He has experience in areas such as policy analysis, business plan development, information systems, website and database development, e-business and e-commerce, cost-benefit analysis of private reserves, marketing research, trade of natural products, and ecotourism among others. He has worked in IT private companies, environmental NGO's, the Ministry of Environment, Housing and Territorial Development of Colombia, as a consultant for UNDP, and as a trade and environment researcher at the Faculty of Environmental and Rural Studies of Colombia. Prior to his work at the OAS, he was coordinating the National Biotrade Watch of Colombia within the Alexander von Humboldt Institute where he developed the Markets Information System and designed the Technology Transfer System of Biotrade for Colombia. He speaks fluent English and Spanish and has working knowledge of Portuguese.

Cesar Parga

César Parga is a Senior Trade Specialist at the Department of Trade, Tourism and Competitiveness of the Organization of American States. Mr. Parga provides technical and analytical support in the fields of intellectual property rights and dispute settlement issues in matters relevant to the work of the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) and other regional trade arrangements. Mr. Parga is in charge of the OAS Competitiveness Program which promotes public policy dialogue and exchange of experiences between high-level authorities and public-private competitiveness councils of the Americas. In the field of trade and integration in the Western Hemisphere, Mr. Parga primarily focuses on issues related to trade promotion, intellectual property, and competitiveness. He coordinates and delivers trade capacity building initiatives for governments, the private sector, and civil society across Latin America and the Caribbean. Mr. Parga designs and implements projects which foster the exchange of best practices, transfer of technology networks, and use of intellectual property in developing countries to promote innovation and competitiveness. Mr. Parga is a lawyer graduated from the University of Guadalajara, México, where he specialized in contracts and torts as Adjunct Professor of Civil Law. He received the LL.M. Master of Laws Degree on Patent and Intellectual Property Rights at the Law School of the George Washington University in Washington, D.C, where he currently serves as Adjunct Professor of Law, and also received a Post Graduate Certificate on International Trade from the University Institute of European Studies and the ILO International Training Center in Torino, Italy. Mr. Parga has served as guest lecturer at the University of Baylor Law School and visiting researcher at the National University of Singapore.

Bill Snape

William (Bill) J. Snape, III is a fellow and practitioner-in-residence at American University, Washington College of Law, as well as the director of adjunct faculty development. Snape is also senior counsel with the Center for Biological Diversity, where he works on endangered species, public lands and energy issues. He is co-producer of “Hot Air,” a radio podcast show on global warming policy and regulation. Previously, Snape was vice president and chief counsel at Defenders of Wildlife for over a decade. Snape has litigated a number of environmental and related cases in federal court, and argued Center for Biological Diversity v. Interior (D.C. Cir. 2009), which rejected the federal government’s plan for oil and gas drilling off the coast of Alaska in part because of climate change concerns. Snape is the author of numerous articles on natural resource issues, including the book Biodiversity and the Law published by Island Press. He presently serves on the President’s Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee, as well as several non-profit boards. He is a magna cum laude graduate of the Honors College at the University of California, Los Angeles, and received his law degree from George Washington University. Snape is a masters’ swimmer and water polo player, has coached at both the Division I and Division III levels of college swimming, and was named the 2011 world swim coach of the year by the International Committee of Sports for the Deaf. He has two teenage boys.

Panelists

The discussion of Post-Negotiation Issues will be enhanced by the participation of expert panelists.

Panelists include:

Sarah Stewart
Ms. Stewart has been Director for Environment and Natural Resources at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative in the Executive Office of the President (USTR) since January 2013. Ms. Stewart’s portfolio is focused on overseeing implementation of the Environment Chapters of U.S. trade agreements in the Western Hemisphere, including the United States – Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (PTPA), United States – Central America – Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA – DR), United States – Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement, United States – Panama Trade Promotion Agreement, and the United States – Chile Free Trade Agreement. Ms. Stewart’s responsibilities also include managing implementation of the PTPA Annex on Forest Sector Governance, and establishment of secretariats for environmental enforcement matters under the PTPA, and TPAs with Colombia and Panama. Ms. Stewart also monitors issues concerning green government procurement, environmental standards, and trade in wildlife and timber species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to ensure consistency of U.S. environmental laws and policy with U.S. trade policy and international trade obligations. Prior to joining USTR’s Environment and Natural Resources Office, Ms. Stewart held the position of Senior Attorney for International Law and Trade at The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) since December 2012, and was Special Counsel for International Trade Policy for Humane Society International (HSI) since August 2007. Prior to HSUS/HSI, Ms. Stewart was an associate with the Law Offices of Stewart and Stewart from September 2002 to August 2007. Ms. Stewart received a bachelor of arts degree in international studies from Lehigh University in 1997, and a law degree with honors from the American University’s Washington College of Law in 2002.

Alejandra Goyenechea
Alejandra Goyenechea is International Counsel at Defenders of Wildlife. Alejandra's primary focus is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and other international trade law issues, with an emphasis on Latin America. She has worked at several international institutions and organizations, and has experience in wildlife policy and broader experience in other environmental areas. During her work with the Mexican government, she represented the Environmental Enforcement Agency at the international level. She also has interned or worked at the Organization of American States, the UNEP North American office, and Baker Botts, a DC law firm. Alejandra earned her law degree at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, Mexico. In 2000, she came to DC on a Fullbright scholarship and completed her LL.M. at the American University Washington College of Law.

Ashley Amidon
Ashley Amidon is the Manager of Government and Public Affairs for the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) where she is the chief lobbyist and handles the IWPA PAC. Prior to joining IWPA she worked for Hammond & Associates in Washington, D.C where she handled fundraising for five members of Congress, which built upon her previous fundraising experience at the Republican National Committee (RNC). She has also worked on numerous political campaigns, and is a graduate of the Jennifer Byler Institute of Virginia. She holds a BA in International Affairs and History from George Mason University in Virginia, and an MA in Globalisation & Governance from the University of Hull in the United Kingdom.

May 29-June 2, 2012

The Environmental Law Summer Session and the Organization of American States Department of Sustainable Development are hosting a joint seminar focusing on capacity-building in the area of Trade and Environment in the Americas. The Seminar will consist of a series of modules taught by leading practitioners from the Americas and will conclude with a trade simulation exercise. The Agenda for the Trade and Environment seminar can be found here: Draft Agenda.

For a detailed schedule of the seminar including links to descriptions of each module and the readings that accompany each module, please visit the Tool Kit. The modules focus on a variety of topics including: Trade and Environment - Law and Policy; the Intersection between Trade and the Environment; Negotiating Agreements; Environmental Dimensions of International Trade; Enforcement of Trade-Related Environmental Obligations; and Post-Negotiation Issues. The seminar will conclude with a Negotiation Simulation Exercise.

During the seminar, the participants will have an opportunity to have a site visit from ExxonMobil. There will also be a Welcome Reception at the Washington College of Law and a closing celebration after the simulation exercise.

Visit the Photo Gallery Here!

Welcome Reception

Additionally, participants had a chance to interact with lawyers, trade and environment specialists, law students, arbitration specialists, and other professionals at a Welcome Reception at the American University Washington College of Law. On Thursday, May 31, the Environmental Law Summer Session and the WCL Summer Session on International Commercial Arbitration co-hosted a Welcome Reception for participants in the Summer Sessions, including the Trade and Environment Seminar with the OAS. Participants were welcomed by Professor David Hunter (Director of the WCL International Legal Studies Program and the Environmental Law Summer Session), Dr. Horacio Naon (Director of the WCL Center on International Commercial Arbitration), and Cletus Springer (the Director of the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States).

Lecturers

Lecturers include the following leading practitioners from government and non-governmental organizations from throughout the Americas (lecturers are listed in chronological order of the seminar):

Gustavo Alanís Ortega

Gustavo Alanís Ortega is President of the Mexican Environmental Law Center (Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental (CEMDA)). Mr. Alanís, a practicing lawyer, teaches environmental law the Universidad Iberoamericana's law school in Mexico City. He is also co-director of the university's post-graduate diploma program in environmental law and policy. Since August 1993, he has been president of CEMDA, a public interest environmental law organization based in Mexico City. He is also active as a columnist for "Reforma," one of Mexico's most read and influential newspapers. He is a member of the seventh cohort of the Leadership of Environment and Development Program (LEAD) and part of the Joint Public Advisory Committee (JPAC) under the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation. Mr. Alanís has an LL.M. in international law from the Washington College of Law.

David Hunter

David Hunter is a Professor of Law and the Director of the International Legal Studies Program and the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law at American University Washington College of Law. He is also the Director of the Environmental Law Summer Session. He is the former Executive Director of the Center for International Environmental Law and was previously an Associate with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher, and Flom. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, EarthRights International, the Project on Government Oversight, the Bank Information Center, and the Center for Progressive Reform. His research and advocacy work covers a broad range of global environment and development issues. Mr. Hunter is a co-author of International Environmental Law and Policy, currently in its 4th edition. He holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Rodrigo Martinez

Rodrigo Martinez was born in Colombia and started working for the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States in late 2007. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia, and a Graduate Certificate of Advanced Financial Management, and a Master in Natural Resource Economics from the University of Queensland, Australia. He has experience in areas such as policy analysis, business plan development, information systems, website and database development, e-business and e-commerce, cost-benefit analysis of private reserves, marketing research, trade of natural products, and ecotourism among others. He has worked in IT private companies, environmental NGO's, the Ministry of Environment, Housing and Territorial Development of Colombia, as a consultant for UNDP, and as a trade and environment researcher at the Faculty of Environmental and Rural Studies of Colombia. Prior to joining DSD, he was coordinating the National Biotrade Watch of Colombia within the Alexander von Humboldt Institute where he developed the Markets Information System and designed the Technology Transfer System of Biotrade for Colombia. He speaks fluent English and Spanish and has working knowledge of Portuguese. Rodrigo's work at the DSD is focused in environmental economics, in particular supporting member States as they develop payment for ecosystem services and also in the linkages of trade and environment.

Claudia de Windt

A lawyer graduated from Universidad Iberoamericana (UNIBE) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic with a LL.M. in International Legal Studies from American University Washington College of Law, Ms. de Windt has been with the OAS since 2001 as a Legal Specialist for the Department of Sustainable Development and Environment. She leads the Department's work in Environmental Law, Policy, and Good Governance. Her work mainly focuses on the governance aspects of sustainability and on the environmental sustainability of free trade agreements; supporting member States identify the challenges and opportunities for sustainable development derived from economic integration. In addition to supporting the strengthening of institutional-legal frameworks in the hemisphere towards sustainability in trade. Ms. de Windt has experience in legal drafting, negotiations, and international development cooperation projects in different areas, such as international project financing, foreign investment, environmental law, and environmental corporate social responsibility. Prior to coming to OAS, Ms. de Windt was an Associate Attorney for the firm Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, where she worked as Counsel for International and local organizations mainly in the areas of contracts, banking, maritime, corporate, and investment law. She was appointed in 1999, by the President of the Dominican Republic as Judicial Interpreter of The Court of First Instance in Santo Domingo. Ms. de Windt is admitted to practice in the Dominican Republic and a member of the Dominican Bar Association. She also served as Vice-President of the LL.M. student association at the Washington College of Law in 2000. Her native language is Spanish and she is fluent in English and has working knowledge of French and Portuguese.

Maria Amparo Alban

Maria Amparo Alban is an Ecuadorian Lawyer graduated from Pontifical Catholic University (PUCE) based in Quito. In 1995,
obtained a master degree in Economic Law with a mention in International Negotiations and Environment, from Andean
University Simon Bolivar (UASB). In 1995-1996, she served as a political advisor for Vice-president Candidate Diego Cordovez, in
charge of his political agenda. In 1996, Maria Amparo co-founded CEDA – Ecuadorian Center for Environmental Law, with a group of Ecuadorian environmental lawyers. From 1995 she has been linked with the Academia, teaching a course on trade and environment in the Schools of Economics and Law at PUCE, and other courses and seminars in other universities, national and international. She has worked in different legislative processes related to environment, in particular in charge of drafting the Biodiversity Law and the Access to Genetic Resources and Biosafety By-laws. She has been invited to participate and lecturer in different international meetings on Environmental Law and Trade and Environment, and has coordinated different research projects on that regards, with OAS, UNEP and UNCTAD. She has hosted an international civil society meeting on trade and environment within the FTAA Quito Ministerial Conference in 2002, and has published several articles in national and international journals. She served as executive director for the Ecuadorian Center for Environmental Law-CEDA, since 2000 to 2004. And in May of 2004 Maria Amparo joined the negotiating team for the Free Trade Agreement with the United States in the environment group on behalf of the Ministry of Environment of Ecuador and has been a consultant for CEDA in other projects.

Geoffrey Garver

Geoffrey Garver is an environmental consultant and lecturer in law in Montreal. From 2000 to 2007, he was a senior official at the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation as Director of the Submissions on Enforcement Matters Unit. THe Unit handles assertions by North American citizens that one of the NAFTA countries -- Mexico, the United States, and Canada -- is failing to effectively enforce its environmental law. Previously, he spent nine years with the U.S. Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division as a trial attorney and then an Acting Assistant Chief, handling cases concerning land and natural resource management, water rights, and environmental impact assessment. His major cases included suits dealing with Everglades water quality, winter use and bison management in Yellowstone National Park, and water rights in Idaho and Oregon. He was also part of the U.S. team negotiating with Canada and Mexico toward an agreement on transboundary environmental impact assessment, and he helped develop federal agency guidelines for conducting environmental reviews of trade agreements. From 1993 to 1995, he was special assistant and Senior Policy Counsel to the Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While with U.S. EPA, he directed the process for revising the U.S. EPA's environmental auditing policy. Before joining the U.S. Justice Department in 1989, he was a judicial clerk for the Hon. Conrad Cyr in the U.S. District Court in Maine. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 1982 and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1987.

Panelists

The discussion of Post-Negotiation Issues will be enhanced by the participation of expert panelists.

Panelists include:

Amy Karpel
Amy Karpel is the Director for Environment and Natural Resources at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Since 2004, Amy Karpel has worked in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), where she has also served as Associate General Counsel. USTR is part of the Executive Office of the President and the U.S. federal agency responsible for developing and implementing U.S. international trade policy. Among other responsibilities, Amy has litigated international trade disputes before the World Trade Organization and negotiated and drafted texts for U.S. free trade agreements with Korea, Peru, Colombia, Oman, Panama, and Central America. Prior to USTR, Amy practiced international trade law as an associate at Stewart and Stewart, a law firm in Washington, DC. Amy is a graduate of American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC and the Jackson School, University of Washington.

Alejandra Goyenechea
Alejandra Goyenechea is International Counsel at Defenders of Wildlife. Alejandra's primary focus is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and other international trade law issues, with an emphasis on Latin America. She has worked at several international institutions and organizations, and has experience in wildlife policy and broader experience in other environmental areas. During her work with the Mexican government, she represented the Environmental Enforcement Agency at the international level. She also has interned or worked at the Organization of American States, the UNEP North American office, and Baker Botts, a DC law firm. Alejandra earned her law degree at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, Mexico. In 2000, she came to DC on a Fullbright scholarship and completed her LL.M. at the American University Washington College of Law.

Ashley Amidon
Ashley Amidon is the Manager of Government and Public Affairs for the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) where she is the chief lobbyist and handles the IWPA PAC. Prior to joining IWPA she worked for Hammond & Associates in Washington, D.C where she handled fundraising for five members of Congress, which built upon her previous fundraising experience at the Republican National Committee (RNC). She has also worked on numerous political campaigns, and is a graduate of the Jennifer Byler Institute of Virginia. She holds a BA in International Affairs and History from George Mason University in Virginia, and an MA in Globalisation & Governance from the University of Hull in the United Kingdom.

June 20-24, 2011

The Environmental Law Summer Session and the Organization of American States Department of Sustainable Development are hosting a joint seminar focusing on capacity-building in the area of Trade and Environment in the Americas. The Seminar will consist of a series of modules taught by leading practitioners from the Americas and will conclude with a trade simulation exercise. Here is a Draft Agenda.

For a detailed schedule of the seminar including links to descriptions of each module and the readings that accompany each module, please visit the Trade and Environment Seminar website. The modules focus on a variety of topics including: Trade and Environment - Law and Policy; the Intersection between Trade and the Environment; Negotiating Agreements; Environmental Dimensions of International Trade; Enforcement of Trade-Related Environmental Obligations; and Post-Negotiation Issues. The seminar will conclude with a Negotiation Simulation Exercise.

During the course of the seminar, the participants will have an opportunity to go on a Site Visit to the Domino Sugar Company in Baltimore, Maryland.

The course will also include two receptions, a welcome reception (more details below) and a closing reception that will be held in conjunction with WCL's Conference on "Challenges of International Accountability: Lessons from Independent Accountability Mechanisms," which was co-sponsored by the World Bank Inspection Panel. At the closing reception, participants will have the opportunity to interact with other lawyers and experts who serve as panel members of the accountability mechanisms at the multilateral development banks.

Please visit the photo gallery to see participants and lecturers from the WCL-OAS Trade and Environment Seminar.


Albert R. Ramdin, OAS Assistant Secretary General
Date: June 21, 2011
Place: Washington, DC
Credit: Patricia Levia/OAS

Welcome Reception

Additionally, participants had a chance to interact with lawyers, trade and environment specialists, and other professionals at a Welcoming Reception on Tuesday, June 21 at the Organization of American States. Participants were welcomed by the OAS Assistant Secretary General Albert R. Ramdin. This reception also allowed participants to interact with participants in another OAS-sponsored course on the WTO. Read the press release. See pictures from the event.

 

Lecturers

Lecturers include the following leading practitioners from government and non-governmental organizations from throughout the Americas (lecturers are listed in chronological order of the seminar):

Gustavo Alanís Ortega

Gustavo Alanís Ortega is President of the Mexican Environmental Law Center (Centro Mexicano de Derecho Ambiental (CEMDA)). Mr. Alanís, a practicing lawyer, teaches environmental law the Universidad Iberoamericana's law school in Mexico City. He is also co-director of the university's post-graduate diploma program in environmental law and policy. Since August 1993, he has been president of CEMDA, a public interest environmental law organization based in Mexico City. He is also active as a columnist for "Reforma," one of Mexico's most read and influential newspapers. He is a member of the seventh cohort of the Leadership of Environment and Development Program (LEAD) and part of the Joint Public Advisory Committee (JPAC) under the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation. Mr. Alanís has an LL.M. in international law from the Washington College of Law.

David Hunter

David Hunter is a Professor of Law and the Director of the International Legal Studies Program and the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law at American University Washington College of Law. He is also the Director of the Environmental Law Summer Session. He is the former Executive Director of the Center for International Environmental Law and was previously an Associate with the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher, and Flom. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, EarthRights International, the Project on Government Oversight, the Bank Information Center, Greenpeace-US, and the Center for Progressive Reform. His research and advocacy work covers a broad range of global environment and development issues. Mr. Hunter is a co-author of International Environmental Law and Policy, currently in its 4th edition. He holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Rodrigo Martinez

Rodrigo Martinez was born in Colombia and started working for the Department of Sustainable Development at the Organization of American States in late 2007. He holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia, and a Graduate Certificate of Advanced Financial Management, and a Master in Natural Resource Economics from the University of Queensland, Australia. He has experience in areas such as policy analysis, business plan development, information systems, website and database development, e-business and e-commerce, cost-benefit analysis of private reserves, marketing research, trade of natural products, and ecotourism among others. He has worked in IT private companies, environmental NGO's, the Ministry of Environment, Housing and Territorial Development of Colombia, as a consultant for UNDP, and as a trade and environment researcher at the Faculty of Environmental and Rural Studies of Colombia. Prior to joining DSD, he was coordinating the National Biotrade Watch of Colombia within the Alexander von Humboldt Institute where he developed the Markets Information System and designed the Technology Transfer System of Biotrade for Colombia. He speaks fluent English and Spanish and has working knowledge of Portuguese. Rodrigo's work at the DSD is focused in environmental economics, in particular supporting member States as they develop payment for ecosystem services and also in the linkages of trade and environment.

Claudia de Windt

A lawyer graduated from Universidad Iberoamericana (UNIBE) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic with a LL.M. in International Legal Studies from American University Washington College of Law, Ms. de Windt has been with the OAS since 2001 as a Legal Specialist for the Department of Sustainable Development and Environment. She leads the Department's work in Environmental Law, Policy, and Good Governance. Her work mainly focuses on the governance aspects of sustainability and on the environmental sustainability of free trade agreements; supporting member States identify the challenges and opportunities for sustainable development derived from economic integration. In addition to supporting the strengthening of institutional-legal frameworks in the hemisphere towards sustainability in trade. Ms. de Windt has experience in legal drafting, negotiations, and international development cooperation projects in different areas, such as international project financing, foreign investment, environmental law, and environmental corporate social responsibility. Prior to coming to OAS, Ms. de Windt was an Associate Attorney for the firm Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, where she worked as Counsel for International and local organizations mainly in the areas of contracts, banking, maritime, corporate, and investment law. She was appointed in 1999, by the President of the Dominican Republic as Judicial Interpreter of The Court of First Instance in Santo Domingo. Ms de Windt is admitted to practice in the Dominican Republic and a member of the Dominican Bar Association. She also served as Vice-President of the LL.M. student association at the Washington College of Law in 2000. Her native language is Spanish and she is fluent in English and has working knowledge of French and Portuguese.

Fernando Ocampo

Fernando Ocampo is the Vice Minister of Trade of Costa Rica. He is an accredited lawyer and has a graduate degree in Public Law from the Universidad de Costa Rica. He has a masters degree in International Economic Policy from the London School of Economics and he has continued his studies at the Centre for Trade, Policy and Law in Ottawa, Canada, and at the World Trade Institute in Berne, Switzerland. Mr. Ocampo is a university professor and an international consultant on topics such as international trade and commercial integration. He has offered conferences in more than fifteen countries and has published numerous articles related to international trade He is currently working at the Ministry of International Trade in Costa Rica as the Deputy Chief for Commercial Matters in the negotiation of the Central America-European Union Association Agreement. Fernando Ocampo has engaged in a number of professional activities. He has done research for different national and international institutions such as the Inter-American Development Bank, the Organization of American States, the World Bank, the Academia de Centroamérica, among others, on topics related to international trade, economic integration, and commercial policy. He has been a panelist in seminars and conferences organized by different institutions, and he also provides assessment to governments in areas related to international trade. Mr. Ocampo served as General Director of International Trade of Costa Rica from 2001 to 2005. His main responsibilities included: participation as Chief of the Group of Access to Markets in the framework of the negotiations for the Free Trade Agreement between the Dominican REpublic, Central America, and the United States; coordination of the definition of the national position in the negotiations for the subscription of the free trade agreements with the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and Panama. He has also been the public officer in charge of coordinating the technical participation of Costa Rica in the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas conformation process and of chairing, in the same forum, the Negotiation Group for Public Sector Procurement. He also led the definition and defense of the Costa Rican position in the Central American integration process with the objective of creating a regional customs union. During 2004, Mr. Ocampo also served as Director of Implementation of International Trade Agreements, where he launched an internal restructuring focusing on internal enforcement. He was responsible for managing and monitoring the functioning of the commercial agreements in place in the country, which include free trade agreements with Mexico, Chile, Canada, and the Dominican Republic.

César Parga

César Parga is a Senior Trade Specialist at the Department for Trade, Tourism, and Competitiveness of the Organization of American States. Mr. Parga provides technical and analytical support in the fields of intellectual property rights and dispute settlement issues in matters relevant to the work of the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) and other regional trade arrangements. He also coordinates and participates in training and capacity building initiatives for Latin America and the Caribbean. He is a lawyer who graduated from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico, where he also served as adjunct professor on civil law. He received a LL.M. on Patent and Intellectual Property Rights at the Law School of the George Washington University in Washington, DC.

Geoffrey Garver

Geoffrey Garver is an environmental consultant and lecturer in law in Montreal. From 2000 to 2007, he was a senior official at the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation as Director of the Submissions on Enforcement Matters Unit. THe Unit handles assertions by North American citizens that one of the NAFTA countries -- Mexico, the United States, and Canada -- is failing to effectively enforce its environmental law. Previously, he spent nine years with the U.S. Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division as a trial attorney and then an Acting Assistant Chief, handling cases concerning land and natural resource management, water rights, and environmental impact assessment. His major cases included suits dealing with Everglades water quality, winter use and bison management in Yellowstone National Park, and water rights in Idaho and Oregon. He was also part of the U.S. team negotiating with Canada and Mexico toward an agreement on transboundary environmental impact assessment, and he helped develop federal agency guidelines for conducting environmental reviews of trade agreements. From 1993 to 1995, he was special assistant and Senior Policy Counsel to the Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. While with U.S. EPA, he directed the process for revising the U.S. EPA's environmental auditing policy. Before joining the U.S. Justice Department in 1989, he was a judicial clerk for the Hon. Conrad Cyr in the U.S. District Court in Maine. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 1982 and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1987.

Panelists

The discussion of Post-Negotiation Issues will be enhanced by the participation of expert panelists. Panelists include:

Amy Karpel
Amy Karpel is the Director for Environment and Natural Resources at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Since 2004, Amy Karpel has worked in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), where she has also served as Associate General Counsel. USTR is part of the Executive Office of the President and the U.S. federal agency responsible for developing and implementing U.S. international trade policy. Among other responsibilities, Amy has litigated international trade disputes before the World Trade Organization and negotiated and drafted texts for U.S. free trade agreements with Korea, Peru, Colombia, Oman, Panama, and Central America. Prior to USTR, Amy practiced international trade law as an associate at Stewart and Stewart, a law firm in Washington, DC. Amy is a graduate of American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC and the Jackson School, University of Washington.

Alejandra Goyenechea
Alejandra Goyenechea is International Counsel at Defenders of Wildlife. Alejandra's primary focus is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and other international trade law issues, with an emphasis on Latin America. She has worked at several international institutions and organizations, and has experience in wildlife policy and broader experience in other environmental areas. During her work with the Mexican government, she represented the Environmental Enforcement Agency at the international level. She also has interned or worked at the Organization of American States, the UNEP North American office, and Baker Botts, a DC law firm. Alejandra earned her law degree at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, Mexico. In 2000, she came to DC on a Fullbright scholarship and completed her LL.M. at the American University Washington College of Law.

For more information about the Trade and Environment Seminar, please contact Erika Lennon.