HOW TO USE THE SITE

 

This site has been designed for use in conjunction with our textbook, but it should prove useful as a stand-alone research site, as well.  The web is particularly well suited to the study of international environmental law and policy, providing a rich resource of materials and contacts that would not otherwise be accessible.  The Internet's global reach and depth of data make it ideal for research and communication throughout the globe.  We will periodically check all the links on the site to ensure they still exist, but if you come across a link that no longer functions we would be grateful if you could e-mail us.

 

The Home page contains links to the book's 21 chapters and annexes.  Each chapter contains relevant links to sites containing treaties, treaty offices, documents, NGOs, government agencies, and cool sites we found while surfing.

 

The Treaties page contains links to all the treaties referenced in the book as well as many others we did not discuss.  For other useful treaty websites, click here.

 

The Institutional Players page contains links to the major UN system institutions, specialized UN agencies and programs, inter-governmental organizations, international financial institutions, and international dispute resolution fora.

 

The Recent Developments page contains links to news stories on the major developments in international environmental law and policy since the book's publication in the summer of 1998.

 

The Teaching Materials page contains sections of the book that were not published out of concerns that the final text weigh less than a hippo.  There are free-standing sections on Trade in the Asia-pacific Region (chapter 16), more detailed information on The Brent Spar Problem Exercise (chapter 11), Coral Reefs (chapter 15), the European Union (chapter 8), and Sea Turtles (chapter 14).

 

The Teacher's Manual page contains the introduction, providing general advice on teaching the subject, and access to the manual.  The manual is password-protected and professors should e-mail Professor Salzman for the access details.