LL.M. International Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition
March 6 – 7, 2015

2015 Competition Rules

The Rules have been posted on September 9, 2014. After this date any change to the rules will be made in the form of a clarification. Clarifications are effective immediately after they have been posted on the Competition website.

Competition Rules in word

Competition Rules in PDF

Clarifications issued in 2014


Clarifications issued in 2013

Clarifications

Clarification Posted September 25, 2013
Pre-mooting
Since the objective of the Competition is that participants develop and improve their advocacy skills, it is expected and encouraged that teams have practice arguments, whether against other members of the team or against other teams that will participate in the Competition. Teams are encouraged to participate in pre-moots. The only restriction is that no team should have a practice argument against a team it is scheduled to meet.
If a school registers 2 teams, these teams can practice oral argument rounds against each other. However, the coaches must ensure that each team works independently on their research argument preparation.

Clarification Posted October 3, 2013

Pre-mooting : exchange argument outlines
Argument outlines can be exchanged between teams only after they have been submitted to the Competition Administration.

Participation of two teams from the same law school
The objective of the Competition is that participants develop and improve their advocacy skills. The competition allows Law Schools to enter two teams so more students can benefit of this opportunity. The coach can discuss the problem as part of the class or in meetings. However, the coach must make sure that each team works independently in their argument preparation and are ready to compete against each other.

Specific questions submitted:

1. May two teams (with the same coach/professor) argue against one-another in “pre-moots” replicating the competition format?
Yes, the teams can moot against each other. However, the coach must make sure that each team works independently in their argument preparation. Teams have to remain independent from one another.

2. May the teams exchange argument outlines prior to their pre-moots, as they would in the competition itself?
Argument outlines can be exchanged between teams only after they have been submitted to the Competition Administration.

3. May members of both teams attend the coach’s class together?
Yes but the coach/professor must ensure that each team works independently on their research and argument preparation.

b. May members of both teams simultaneously discuss the problem with the coach and one-another?
It is the responsibility of the coach to ensure that the teams work independently. They can discuss the problem as part of the class. However, each team must work independently in developing their arguments, research and outline. It is important that the coach helps maintain the independence of each team in case that they have to compete against each other.

Clarification Posted October 11, 2013

Scoring:

Each of the three arbitrators sitting on an arbitral panel must assess the oralists individually.

Each arbitrator shall award each oralist a score between 0 and 30. This total score reflects the addition of points obtained by each oralist in the following categories:

  • Overall Presentation (__/10)

Confidence; delivery; voice; clarity;  word choice; eye contact; enthusiasm; poise; deference toward the tribunal; gestures; ability to engage the tribunal; time management; ability to respond directly and clearly; logic of responses; composure under questioning. Since English is not the first language of many of the participants, when evaluating the oral performance of the participants, arbitrators shall focus on the strength of the arguments and the ability of the participants to communicate their ideas effectively. 

  • Structure of Argument (__/10)

Clear, logical, and persuasive organization of argument; Focus on the most compelling arguments; transition between arguments; strong conclusion.

  • Preparation and Familiarity with Material (__/10)

Knowledge of the record, relevant law, and policy implications; use of authority; responsiveness to opposing counsel; application of law and policy to facts.

The arbitrators will add the points obtained by both team members to determine that team’s total amount of points (that number will range from 0 to 60).

The team with the highest total score is considered the winning team. In the event of a tie, the arbitrators should award one extra point to the best team to determine a winner.

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